• From Down Under: Dean of Swinburne Law School, Professor Dan Hunter, and Swinburne researcher Professor Mirko Bagaric say artificial intelligence (AI) could improve sentencing procedures by removing emotional bias and human error. Seems these gentlemen are unaware of 2017’s several instances of AI exhibiting bias and even racism. AI has a way to go

  • In this article, Burr Forman associate E. Travis Ramsey, discusses the coming relevance of AI to appellate advocacy, including: (1) compiling the appellate record; (2) written advocacy; and (3) oral advocacy. He concludes with: (reasonable, in my opinion) “AI will play a role in appellate advocacy, and it will begin by supplementing the work

  • This article from the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology (Regulating Artificial Intelligence Systems: Risks, Challenges, Competencies, and Strategies by Matthew U. Scherer of Littler Mendelson), is a bit long and complex, but it is the most thorough treatment of the issue (regulating AI) I have seen.
  • In Darwin, Australia, Ailira (Artificially Intelligent Legal