• Legalweek (formerly Legaltech) is just a few days away, so here’sA Beginner’s Guide To The Biggest Week In Legal Technology.

 

  • Data & Analytics: Transforming Law Firms” has just been published by ALM Intelligence and LexisNexis. Here’s an executive summary and link to the report.

 

  • Here’s a fresh essay about law firm innovation from  of Thomson Reuters Legal Managed ServicesGreasing The Gears Of Legal Commerce — Automatic, Systematic, Hydromatic (alt.legal) Innovation. “CLOs indicated that nearly 25 percent of outside counsel fees are “price-insensitive.”

 

  • The Big 4 continue their relentless march into legal. I skip most of these posts, but this one specifically mentions AI: KPMG expands Asia Pacific legal services. “It will also offer technology enabled legal services, using robotics, artificial intelligence and other technologies developed globally and in China through the KPMG digital ignition centre.”

 

  • This is an interesting post by Charles P. Edwards of Barnes & Thornburg: The Noisy Business of the Law and Insurance Claims. “…(T)he idea we humans are needed for most decisions is an ‘illusion.'”

 

  • Here’s a good example of a law firm (Amsterdam’s De Brauw) using tech as a differentiating marketing strategyHop on board and experience the value of legal tech and project management.

 

  • Bob Ambrogi posted this 47-minute podcast: LawNext Episode 25: Using AI to Enhance Virtual Receptionists, with Smith.ai.

 

  • From Arup Das of Alphaserve Technologies, here’s an interesting discussion of the age-old build vs. buy conundrum: How to Approach Legal Innovation: Options for Every Firm.

 

  • This is a thought-provoking post: Can Deepfakes Pose a Cybersecurity Threat to Legal? ““Deepfakes are real and emerging as an issue but they, like certain types of technology, could emerge very quickly; we talk about this today and it could be a very big deal in six months or it could be nothing,” Reed Smith’s Stegmaier cautioned. “We simply don’t know.””

 

  • This hour-long podcast is from the Lawyerist: “In this episode with Natalie Worsfold, we talk about her law firm’s approach to law practice, and why more firms aren’t following suit. We start by asking Natalie what problem Counter Tax was trying to solve, then explore how they solved it, what their solution does now, and the plans they have to evolve and grow their solution.”

 

  • This is an idea I have been kicking around for a while. Nick Hilborne gives it the thought I believe it’s due: “Reproduction of the legal profession” at risk from automation. “If junior associates are ‘gradually culled’ from law firms as a result of automation, the entire reproduction of the legal profession could be jeopardised….'” And here’s a US write up of the same issue: Junior Lawyers Are Going Extinct And Nobody Knows What To Do About It.

 

  • AI Goes to Court: A Conversation With Lex Machina and Dorsey & Whitney. Post here.

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

  • The Benefits of the LexisNexis LegalTech Accelerator. Post here.
  • EY and Artificial Lawyer Hold Legal Ops + Technology Event.  Post here.
  • Slaughter and May Names 3rd Fast Forward Cohort, Inc. Blockchain Co. Post here.
  • Meet ATJ Bot – The World’s First Legal Aid Voice Assistant. Post here.
  • How to Build Your Business Case For Contract Management – The Juro Guide. Post here.
  • Oz + NZ Professional Services Startup of the Year Award Launched. Post here.
  • Legal AI Co. CourtQuant Predicts Hard Brexit Impact on British Law. Post here.
  • Christian Lang + Former TR Boss, Tom Glocer, Join Reynen Court. Post here.
  • GCs Keen To Embrace Tech Tools + Legal Ops Skills – Survey. Post here. (Note: This story is based on a survey where n=80. Assuming no other methodological problems [big assumption!], this means that in all of the findings each number is well within the margin of sampling error of the statistics above and below it on the graphs.)
  • Meet Fincap Law: A New Tech-Driven Firm For the New Legal Era. Post here.

 

Posts by Law Firms:

 

 

 

 

 

  • Eric A. Klein and Aytan Dahukey of Sheppard Mullin posted: Day 2 Notes From The 2019 JPMorgan Healthcare Conference. “We are seeing a lot of healthcare entities starting to focus on precision medicine – artificial intelligence suggesting which oncology drug works best for your specific genetic condition and cancer – but that essentially is a transactional function. And the market really wants a partnering function ” Post here.

 

 

 

  • From Reed SmithDraft ethics guidelines for trustworthy artificial intelligence published by the European Commission. Post here.

 

 

  • Akin Gump postedPolicymakers Focused on Artificial Intelligence, Write Akin Gump Lawyers in The Journal of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence & Law.

 

  • Hogan Lovells postedLitigating intellectual property issues: The impact of AI and machine learning.

 

Press Releases and sponsored posts:

  • Here’s a thorough explanation of Gavelytics: Want Better Litigation Outcomes? Know Your Judges. “…(W)ith Gavelytics, you finally get the quantifiable and reliable judge information you need to customize your litigation strategy and increase your chances of winning.”

 

 

  • Gibson Dunn launches AI and automated systems group. Post here.

 

  • The world’s first virtual lawyer, built for Amazon’s Alexa, tests whether lawyers will be replaced by robots. “Australian legal-technology company Smarter Drafter have announced a prototype virtual lawyer, built on Amazon’s Alexa, that creates legal.” documents instantly, just like a real human lawyer. Here’s the Smart Drafter release. Hype much?? And then there’s this: “No date has been set for the release of the first working Alexa integration.”

 

  • HaystackID Acquires eDiscovery Managed Services Provider eTERA, Release here.

 

  • Legal IT Newswire New Product News… Alphaserve Technologies launch Execution as a Service. Post here.

 

  • I’m including this because I used to work there! Am Law 200 Firm Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie Selects Litera Desktop, Litera Microsystems Full Document Drafting Suite.

 

Blockchain

 

 

 

 

  • From the Baker & Hostetler Energy BlogNew Blockchain Products, an FBI Raid, the $11 Billion Bitcoin Case, Hackers Strike With a 51 Percent Attack and Crypto Tax Analysis. Post here.

 

 

  • Here’s a deep dive into the legal services offered by Oath ProtocolThe Lay of the Land in Blockchain Dispute Resolution and Governance Designs.
  • O’Melveny is getting a lot of coverage of its recent announcement that it will use neuroscience-based games in its recruitment process. See stories here, here, here and here.

 

  • This post was prepared by Kurt Watkins of Contextum and Matthew Savare of Lowenstein Sandler and published by the ACC via Lexology: The Rise of Artificial Intelligence and its Impact on General Counsel. It’s a solid deep dive and includes specific advice for GCs. “The technological advancement of AI and its concomitant increased adoption in the legal profession cannot be stopped. For many years, lawyers believed that AI would not impact them or their profession. Think again. In order to stay ahead of the proverbial curve, general counsel need to understand this transformation, adjust their ways of thinking….”

 

  • Seyfarth’s Hannah L. JacksonRaymond Tran and Theodore E. Woodward postedWave Of The Future: The Effect Of AI And Robotics On Commercial Real Estate. It’s a solid, rather in-depth look. “Advancements in AI robotics and integration with the IoT have the potential to change the way that commercial properties are owned, leased, managed and operated in the future.”

 

  • The Centre for Information Policy Leadership (“CIPL”) at Hunton Andrews Kurth recently published the first report in its project on Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) and Data Protection: Delivering Sustainable AI Accountability in Practice. The report, entitled “Artificial Intelligence and Data Protection in Tension” aims to describe in clear, understandable terms: what AI is and how it is being used all around us today; the role that personal data plays in the development, deployment and oversight of AI; and the opportunities and challenges presented by AI to data protection laws and norms.” Overview here.

 

  • This, from DLA Piper: International Trade Alert. “The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) on November 19, 2018 requesting public comment on identifying ’emerging technology.’ Under the Export Control Reform Act of 2018 (ECRA), which was signed into law on August 13, 2018, the Department of Commerce is authorized to establish export controls on emerging and foundational technologies under the framework of the Commerce Control List (CCL). In the ANPRM, BIS indicated that it will issue a separate ANPRM for ‘foundational technology’.”

 

  • The Alliott Group (Maciej Kokotposted: An Alternative Perspective On Use Of Artificial Intelligence In Professional Firms. “This article, written by Alliott Group Polish accounting and law firm member ALTO, provides an alternative perspective on AI’s role in the mid-size firm. Authors Maciej Kokot and Wojciech Kokot propose we question the preconceptions and fears we have surrounding AI, and instead invite accountants and lawyers to familiarise themselves with its capabilities. From automating rudimentary accounting services to streamlining first-line support using chatbots, this article outlines why we have every reason to feel positively about the rise of AI.”

 

  • This post is from Switzerland’s Bär & Karrer‘s Andrew M. GarbarskiThe Sealing Of Evidence Under Swiss Criminal Procedure Law. “The fast-changing technical landscape and the potentially endless capabilities of artificial intelligence may ultimately offer better solutions for judicial authorities and practitioners alike. However, in the meantime, both must turn towards the case law of the SFSC to find practical ways of dealing with the increasing complexity of unsealing procedures.”

 

  • If you’re interested in how the Skunkworks approach to innovation adoption can work at a law firm (I am!), check out this podcast interview with Orrick’s Chair, Mitch Zullie.

 

  • Here’s a rather academic piece from the University of Toronto — Faculty of Law’s Benjamin Alarie, Anthony Niblett and Albert YoonHow Artificial Intelligence Will Affect the Practice of Law. “In the short run, we can expect greater legal transparency, more efficient dispute resolution, improved access to justice, and new challenges to the traditional organization of private law firms delivering legal services on a billable hour basis through a leveraged partner-associate model.” “In the longer term, it is difficult to predict the impact of artificially intelligent tools will be, as lawyers incorporate them into their practice and expand their range of services on behalf of clients.”

 

  • “A subsidiary of the German arm of Clifford Chance has entered into a partnership to advance the development of an AI platform. Clifford Chance Tech GmbH and German firm EVANA will work together to enhance EVANA’s platform for corporate law and M&A transactions.” More here, here and here.

 

  • In this post, Law Society Council member, addresses the question, “…if you are going to receive advice or even representation from either a solicitor or a robot with artificial intelligence, should the criteria for the product be the same in each case?” Interesting read.

 

  • Dentons’ Todd D. DaubertPeter G. FeldmanJason M. Silverman and Michael E. Zolandz posted: BIS Begins Process For Export Controls Of “Emerging And Foundational” Technologies: What Tech Companies Need To Know. “On November 19, the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), which controls the export of sensitive dual-use and less-sensitive military goods and technology, took an important preliminary step in establishing the review and control process required under ECRA. The agency published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM), soliciting comments from the public on specific matters related to identifying and controlling emerging and foundational technologies.” More here.

 

  • Also from Dentons (this time, Eric J. TanenblattCrawford Schneider and James A. Richardson): Autonomous Vehicles Start Act Legislative Update. “Republicans are eager to finally advance a light-touch autonomous vehicle regulatory framework after the proposal has languished for more than a year in committee over cyber and safety concerns.”

 

  • Here’s part 6 of Mintz’ Strategies To Unlock AI’s Potential In Healthcare, Commercialization Of AI Tools In Healthcare – The Challenge Of Securing Adequate Data Rights.

 

  • A blog on behalf of CILEx Regulation by Eve Dullabh, managing director of the Law Training Centre in Kent: Reality versus the robot lawyers. “…(L)egal training will be required to adapt accordingly to provide the skills to the modern lawyer in order to remain indispensable in the era of AI technology. Cyber-security training, management of risk training and coding will, inevitably, become part of every lawyer’s legal training and, already, some of the top firms in the country have recognised this and instructed that all their trainees undertake coding training. The future is now and embracing the evolution of the new legal era will prepare us for the things to come.”

 

  • Steven D. Lofchie of Cadwalader postedFRB Governor Brainard Focuses On Risks And Supervisory Approaches Associated With AI. “Federal Reserve Board (“FRB”) Governor Lael Brainard urged firms to be mindful of risks associated with artificial intelligence (‘AI’) innovation and advised regulators to remain diligent in the quest to understand and regulate the use of AI by supervised firms.”

 

  • Also from Steven D. Lofchie, FDIC Chair McWilliams Urges More Collaboration On FinTech. “In remarks delivered at the FinTech and the New Financial Landscape Conference, Ms. McWilliams underscored that innovation is expanding bank access to more customers, and that new technology has enhanced ‘customer experience, [lowered] transaction costs, and increase[d] credit availability’.”

 

  • WilmerHale‘s Timothy Syrett and Natalie R. Pous prepared this articleThe Developing Landscape Of Internet Of Things Standards For Cars, “the first in a series of five articles written by WilmerHale discussing how the emergence of IoT technologies will impact the automotive industry. “The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the connection of a multitude of devices through the Internet to collect and exchange data. One area of particular promise for the IoT is cars. Exchanges of data between cars on a street, between cars and pedestrians crossing the street, between cars and traffic lights on the street, and between cars and the Internet could improve safety, reduce traffic, save fuel, and make for a more entertaining drive.”

 

  • And here‘s a closely related article, also from Wilmer (this time by Christian DuvernoyFrédéric LouisDr. Martin BraunAnne ValleryItsiq Benizri and Naboth van den Broek): The European Commission Launches A Public Consultation On Connected And Automated Vehicles. “The ambition of the European Union (“EU”) is to become a world leader in the deployment of connected and automated mobility. The EC believes that driverless mobility and connectivity will help bring down the number of road fatalities and reduce harmful emissions and congestion. In this context, the EC published a Communication in which it identified the actions it would take to guide the sector and EU countries to reach its objectives. One of these actions is to issue a Recommendation to complement the regulatory framework for connected and automated mobility and to help EU countries achieve a coordinated approach in this respect.”

 

 

 

  • From Jones DayDriverless, Networked Vehicles on the Rise, French Liability Regulations Lag Behind. “The Situation: Autonomous cars with incorporated artificial intelligence (“AI”) are now a reality whereas French regulations have yet to adjust. The Issue: The phenomenon of new autonomous cars using AI gives rise to questions about how product liability principles will apply and adapt thereto. Looking Ahead: Carmakers should already be considering what liability risks could be created by incorporating AI in autonomous cars and how to mitigate such risks.”

 

  • Andy Neill of HighQ postedWhat’s artificial about ethical AI in the law? Everything. “Lawyers are trained and have studied ethics. They must be utilised to succeed in creating ethical AI programs.” It’s an interesting read.

 

  • Here’s an important and useful study conducted by Dentons: Dentons submits results of research into the development of global legislation in robotics, AI and cyberphysical systems. “Dentons global law firm has carried out unique, large-scale research of the development of law and legislation on robotics, artificial intelligence and cyberphysical systems. The research was commissioned by the Competency Center for Statutory Regulation of the Digital Economy, which operates at the Skolkovo Foundation. It is the first such research done in Russia.”

 

  • This post is from Hungary’s KCG Partners Law FirmFree Flow Of Non-Personal Data In The European Union. “According to the communication of the European Parliament, the Council of the EU will adopt the regulation in the coming weeks, before it will enter into force by the end of the year. The Member States will have 6 months to apply the new rules from the date of the formal adoption of the regulation.”

 

  • Here’s a taste of what to expect at the “Emerging Legal Departments: Legal Tech 101” roundtable (Evolve the Law, Above the Law’s Legal Innovation Center at Logikcull’s San Francisco headquarters) on December 5. Monica Zent and Stephanie Corey will lead the discussion.

 

  • From José Santacroce of Moeller IP Advisors we have: The European Patent Office (EPO) Publishes New Guidelines On Computer-Implemented Inventions (CII). “…(T)he new EPO CII Guidelines include for the first time new sections on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), and on Simulation, design or modelling.” Post here.

 

  • Philip Cupitt of Marks & Clerk posted: Artificial Intelligence: Is Your Business Ready? “Our own research at Marks & Clerk reveals that more than 78,000 patent applications relating to AI were filed around the world in 2017. On current trends, we’ll see around 86,000 such patent applications filed in 2018, which represents almost a twofold increase in the past decade.”

 

  • Government invests to research how AI can improve the law was posted on Legal Futures by Dan Bindman, “The government is funding research into the potential for artificial intelligence (AI) to improve the legal system, with a warning that, if the technology is mishandled, it could have dire consequences. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) will fund three research projects into aspects of AI costing £3m, of which ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for law’ is one.”

 

  • HBR Consulting postedLaw firms must act with urgency to keep pace with law department analytics maturity. “…(L)aw departments are gathering, centralizing and sharing more data than ever, and many law firms are lagging behind.”

 

  • Law schools are often (and often justifiably) accused of not keeping pace with innovations in the business of law. But here are some noteworthy exceptions: You Think Legal Education Can’t Change? 8 Innovative Ideas from Law Schools.

 

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

– Few GCs Have ‘Digital Transformation Skills’ – LawGeex Report. Link.

– Nordic Law Firms Go All-In For Legal AI, (Especially Luminance), But Why? Link.

– UK Gov + MoJ Back Major Research Project to Boost Legal AI Use. Link.

– Relativity Partner QDiscovery Buys Evidox in eDiscovery Consolidation Move. Link.

 

Blockchain

 

  • Smart Contracts May Have Weaknesses. This Tool Helps Find Them. “ released a blockchain security monitoring service that includes a tool by ConsenSys Diligence allowing users to scan smart contracts for vulnerabilities.” Story here.

 

  • Pinsent Masons postedMEPs call for business GDPR ‘guarantee’ on using blockchain. “Businesses should not begin using blockchain technology to process personal data until they can ‘guarantee compliance’ with EU data protection laws, a committee of MEPs has said.”

 

 

  • This, from Sheppard Mullin: United States: The Hammer Falls On The First Major Blockchain-Based Art Auction. “Christie’s made history again last night during its evening sale, An American Place: The Barney A. Ebsworth Collection, at 20 Rockefeller Center in New York. This time, the history was not in the form of a record-setting sale (though the sale brought in $317.8 million), but as the first major art auction to be recorded by distributed ledger technology.”

 

 

  • Here’s a blockchain milestone: “Abu Dhabi-headquartered Al Hilal Bank has carried a blockchain-based transaction for an Islamic bond worth $500 million. The bank, an investment arm of the Abu Dhabi government, announced Monday that it settled the Islamic, shariah-compliant bond, or sukuk, worth $500 million on the secondary market, using blockchain tech.”

 

  • And here’s another: Real Estate on the Blockchain: $20 Million Sale ‘. “In the first offering of its kind, U.S. investors can now acquire a piece of South Carolina real estate in the form of blockchain tokens. The tokens represent ownership in a luxury student residence called The Hub … which is located near the University of South Carolina in the state’s capital.”

 

  • This is an interesting article from the December issue of the ABA JournalWhat do AI, blockchain and GDPR mean for cybersecurity? “…(W)e close this series by looking around the bend to understand how major emerging technologies will affect cybersecurity in the coming years. While experts disagree when technologies such as artificial intelligence and blockchain will play a larger role in cybersecurity and data protection, there is broad agreement that their roles will be pivotal. This could, in turn, create new solutions, risks and regulatory headaches.”
  • Some recent posts report some variation of: “Legal Industry in Last Place in AI, Machine Learning Adoption, According to RELX Survey“. I can’t find the study’s detailed results or methodology, but from what I see best case accuracy is +/-8%, so all 6 industries are probably in a statistical tie. Here’s an example of such reporting. Let the reader beware.

 

  • Yanbin Xu of Finnegan postedStrategies For Blockchain Patent Applications. (I’d say more, but the article is only available in Chinese.)

 

  • Yalonda T. Howze of Mintz posted (in English!): Strategies To Unlock AI’s Potential In Health Care, Part 5: Product Liability Prevention For AI Product Designers—And Their Lawyers. “From my experience in working with outside counsel, in-house counsel, designers and engineers, it has become apparent that safer product design and the minimization of product liability exposure in the AI space requires a collaborative, systematic and iterative protocol. Ultimately, this approach helps to better protect the user, the brand, and the company.”

 

  • Yesterday I had a post from Wales, so today, here’s one from Scotland: In 2050: Education – Equipping Our Learners For The Future, from Neil Maclean of Shepherd and Wedderburn. “As part of Shepherd and Wedderburn’s 250th anniversary, we commissioned the Fraser of Allander Institute to undertake a research project to identify how Scotland might best position itself for the future. The initial scene-setter report can be found here.”

 

  • This is a very deep dive by Fichte & Co.: Demystifying the Financial Regulatory Landscape in the UAE. “The areas that Fintech Hive encourages include big data analytics & protective modeling, robo advisors, biometric & digital identification, the blockchain, P2P & crowdfunding, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence & machine learning, InsurTech, Islamic fintech and RegTech.”

 

  • Meanwhile in India: Redesign ICAI (Institute of Chartered Accountants of India) For The Contemporary World. “PwC and Deloitte are respectively the sixth and seventh largest legal services providers in the world. Accounting firms have an edge in using artificial intelligence and machine learning. The committee’s proposal to allow MDPs will enable audit firms to provide integrated services. Safeguards are necessary to maintain independence.”

 

  • Marine Giral and Herbert Smith’s Shaun McVicar penned: The blockchain revolution and what it means for pharma. “With the development of data driven artificial intelligence, increasingly complex decision could be automated, and implemented without delay. Blockchain transactions are immutable, which makes it virtually impossible to alter or selectively report clinical trial results and could ensure greater transparency and trust in reported outcomes.” There’s quite a lot about blockchain in the article.

 

  • Orrick’s Daniel Nathan and Jorge Pesok postedA Foreboding View of Smart Contract Developer Liability. “On October 16, 2018, Commissioner Brian Quintenz of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission explained his belief that smart contract developers can be held liable for aiding and abetting CFTC rule violations if it was reasonably foreseeable that U.S. persons could use the smart contract they created to violate CFTC rules.” ” In his speech, Commissioner Quintenz provided valuable insight into how one regulator is thinking about applying existing laws to this new market.”

 

  • From the ‘Who’d a Thunk It’ department, Bob Ambrogi went to Moscow and discovered legal tech startups! Dispatch From Russia: Legal Tech Startups Emerge, But Adoption Lags. “Cyrillic doesn’t do AI any favors.” That’s just one footnote to Bob’s very interesting story here.

 

  • For this small, informal survey from the UK, “Jomati interviewed 29 innovation heads from 24 practices and ‘explored the innovation and legal tech strategies of dozens more law firms’.” “While some pioneering law firms had decided firmly, for instance, on adopting artificial intelligence (AI) technology, others were waiting until its cost advantages over outsourcing were more certain before taking the plunge.”

 

  • The Baker McKenzie report Ghosts in the Machine: Revisited I reported last week is getting quite a few mentions in legal and financial publications. Here’s an example. And here.

 

 

  • A couple of months ago, Artificial Lawyer covered the blockchain-based contract software by Chainlink. Now even the MIT Technology Review is taking notice: Blockchain smart contracts are finally good for something in the real world. “A startup says it has tackled a long-standing problem that has kept smart contracts from responding to actual events.” “Using cryptography, the Chainlink service provides proof on the blockchain that the data is in fact the information it committed to delivering. Customers can pay for different levels of decentralization, and the nodes can make money in return for submitting data. Nazarov says the combination of Chainlink’s software with the Town Crier hardware system is the first ‘provably secure, decentralized oracle network.'” Story here.

 

  • This is pretty cool: “The Open Data Institute (ODI), co-founded by the inventor of the web Sir Tim Berners-Lee, is to launch two of the first ever government-backed Data Trusts in the world, with the purpose of training AI systems underpinned by a specific legal structure.” “Data Trusts, which are legally constructed entities, are seen as the answer and help form a regulated bridge between the collected data and the AI companies (or other tech companies such as smart contract developers), while retaining public trust.” More from Artificial Lawyer here.

 

  • Also from the UK  via Computer WeeklyPutting the UK at the forefront of ethics and innovation in AI and data. “Stellar British firms are using artificial intelligence (AI) to help defend against cyber attacks and law firms are adopting the technology to help lawyers do legal searches and draft documentation. But we know the huge rise in the use of data-driven technology must be backed up by a strong ethical framework so it delivers the best for people.” This piece is by Jeremy Wright, Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (aka, “Culture Secretary”).

 

  • Several firms have posted in the past couple of weeks about moves by various US Government agencies and departments to regulate or at least study AI and related topics. Here’s a sampling:

From GoodwinU.S. Government to Define ‘Emerging Technologies’, impacting CFIUS and Export Controls.

From Sheppard MullinThe Little Regulation That Will Make a Big Change in How You Do Business: Department of Commerce to Establish New Export Controls on Emerging Technologies.

–  From DechertNew Government Regulation of Emerging Technology.

From SkaddenUS Department of Commerce Solicits Comments Regarding Emerging Technologies That Are Essential to US National Security.

From LathamDeep Dive on Deep Learning: FTC Considers Artificial Intelligence.

From DLA PiperA New Chapter in Stress Testing. “While noting that emerging artificial intelligence technologies offer many actual and potential beneficial applications for banking, Fed Board Governor Lael Brainard said that financial services ‘firms should be continually vigilant for new issues in the rapidly evolving area of AI.'”

From Davis PolkNewsflash: FTC Hearings 5, 6 and 7 on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century.

From Holland & KnightFTC Kicks Off New Consumer Protection Hearings: Focuses On The Use Of Big Data And Artificial Intelligence.

– From Squire Patton BoggsDigital Health Update: Recent FDA Cyber Initiatives.

From CadwaladerFDIC Chair McWilliams Urges More Collaboration On FinTech.

 

  • This discussion of “Cyber security and AI predictions 2018” from Information Age is very relevant to law firms. It discusses the many motivations, vectors and targets involved. AI is mentioned as a necessary defense mechanism (as well as potential miscreant).

 

  • If you’re looking for a very brief intro to AI and its application to legal work, you can’t do much better than this short piece from Thomson Reuters. And here’s a VERY similar piece from Above the Law.

 

 

 

 

  • Governments involved in AI:

US (from Sheppard Mullin): Seeking foreign investors for your tech startup? Congress says, “not so fast.”

France to vet takeovers of firms in data and artificial intelligence.

– “Europe plans to spend €1 billion on supercomputers as it looks to keep pace with the US and China.” “…to develop technologies such as artificial intelligence and build the future’s everyday applications in areas like health, security or engineering.”

 

  • From CES:

– I love this: a security camera that, to protect your privacy, looks away when you get home.

– The NYT has dubbed this year’s event, “The Year of AI.” And The Economist says, Artificial intelligence dominated the Consumer Electronics Show.”

– This article discusses the ways tech being presented at CES may impact the insurance industry. “2018 is another year for further disruption in the insurance industry. It seems that most personal consumer tech can become an InsurTech that can change how we purchase and use insurance going forward.”

– AIcorrect Translator from Babel Technology in Beijing is getting attention. “It supports real-time mutual translation in multiple situations between Chinese/English and 30 other languages, including Japanese, Korean, Thai, French, Russian and Spanish, major languages like English are further divided into accents. The translation quality reaches as high as 96%.”