There was very little real AI or blockchain news over the holidays, especially legal-related. But there was a plethora of posts reviewing 2018 and forecasting 2019 and beyond, so that’s the focus of this post. I suggest you skim these titles and then skim through the lists included in most of the posts; you’re likely

  • Ron Friedmann has pulled together pieces from three WSJ articles to offer a bit of a plan for improving value to clients, and hence to the law firm. His thesis combines considerations of Customer Lifetime Value (CLV), Productivity, and Big Data.
  • This, from Eran Kahana of Stanford Law School: Artificial Intelligence and Computational

  • From CBS News: “Cyberattacks targeting the 2018 midterm election aren’t just relying on tested tactics like phishing attacks, social media influence campaigns, and ransomware targeting critical infrastructure — they’re also harnessing technology in new and ever more threatening ways. Cybersecurity experts are concerned that emerging technology like artificial intelligence and automation powered by 

  • Here’s a deeper dive into Ron Friedmann’s argument that legal tech is in the midst of “evolution” rather than a “revolution”. It’s an interesting read, well-reasoned with several examples. “…(I)n-house counsel change buying habits slowly, which in turn slows legal innovation.” I love that he focuses on the “voice of the client,” as should we

  • This post from Ron Friedmann (Exploding Legal Surveys and Conferences) is a good way to start the week. Ron asserts that one of the common findings of these ever-proliferating surveys is “that large law firms and corporate law departments have already transformed, if not been disrupted.” He rightly concludes that this is “hogwash.”