There was very little real AI or blockchain news over the holidays, especially legal-related. But there was a plethora of posts reviewing 2018 and forecasting 2019 and beyond, so that’s the focus of this post. I suggest you skim these titles and then skim through the lists included in most of the posts; you’re likely

  • I was intrigued by the title (Ghosts in the Machine: Revisited), enthralled by the infographics and impressed by the content. If you’re at all interested in the impact of AI on financial institutions, check out this beautiful report from Baker McKenzie. “…(I)t’s clear that institutions, from banks to insurers, asset managers to payment

  • Here’s Bob Ambroji’s take on The Pew Charitable Trusts’ entry into A2J: A Potentially Major Lifeline For Low-Income Legal Tech And A2J. Bob discusses how Pew will attack several specific A2J obstacles. “Pew’s express commitment to increase access to free online legal tools and to develop new platforms to help people interact with the

  • Kennedys to prototype six innovations from its Ideas Lab. “Staff at law firm Kennedys could become CEOs of their own legal start-ups after it shortlisted six of the more than 100 proposals generated through its Ideas Lab. The six shortlisted proposals will now be turned into prototypes with the help of the firm’s offshore

  • This post from Ron Friedmann (Exploding Legal Surveys and Conferences) is a good way to start the week. Ron asserts that one of the common findings of these ever-proliferating surveys is “that large law firms and corporate law departments have already transformed, if not been disrupted.” He rightly concludes that this is “hogwash.”

Strategic Planning: If you want to know my best guess as to what’s most likely to happen next year, connect the dots from 2016 to 2017 and draw a straight line to 2018. If you want to plan for 10 years for now, good luck; I promise that between now and then there will

  • From the ‘this is just cool!’ department, “Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem devised a method enabling computers to mine databases of patents, inventions and research papers, identifying ideas that can be repurposed to solve new problems or create new products.” This is based on recent advances in AI’s ability