There was very little real AI or blockchain news over the holidays, especially legal-related. But there was a plethora of posts reviewing 2018 and forecasting 2019 and beyond, so that’s the focus of this post. I suggest you skim these titles and then skim through the lists included in most of the posts; you’re likely

  • Facial recognition AI has been in the news and on my mind a lot lately. Of course, there are legal implications, but regardless of that aspect, these developments are a big deal of which you should be aware.

– Traveling this 4th of July? Orlando’s airport has rolled out facial recognition for all departing passengers

  • These thoughts by Paul Rawlinson, Global Chair of Baker McKenzie and sobering and realistic. Will lawyers become extinct in the age of automation? His observations include, “…(T)he market will kill those who don’t adapt. They are the ones who should be scared of the machines. For them, the robots are coming. The really wise lawyers,

  • From Osborne Clarke: “From a venture capital perspective, London was Europe’s premier destination for technology investment last year, with research figures showing that London attracted more funding than Paris, Berlin and the next seven cities combined.  Whilst Fintech continued to be a particularly attractive target for funds in 2017, the standout growth area over

  • This discussion of “Cyber security and AI predictions 2018” from Information Age is very relevant to law firms. It discusses the many motivations, vectors and targets involved. AI is mentioned as a necessary defense mechanism (as well as potential miscreant).
  • If you’re looking for a very brief intro to AI and its application to

  • From Law.com, an article by Danny Tobey, a Vinson & Elkins partner, titled, “AI is Here, Is Your Company Ready? (Hint: No).” First, a bit of hype:”The scale and scope of artificial intelligence is well-described. Merrill Lynch predicts an “annual creative disruption impact” of $14 to $33 trillion by 2025. Accenture estimates AI

  • This article from the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology (Regulating Artificial Intelligence Systems: Risks, Challenges, Competencies, and Strategies by Matthew U. Scherer of Littler Mendelson), is a bit long and complex, but it is the most thorough treatment of the issue (regulating AI) I have seen.
  • In Darwin, Australia, Ailira (Artificially Intelligent Legal