• Here’s a very interesting article from Oxford’s Internet Institute and Faculty of Law. It’s more than six months old, but I just found it. Artificial Intelligence Crime: An Interdisciplinary Analysis of Foreseeable Threats and Solutions. “Artificial Intelligence (AI) research and regulation seek to balance the benefits of innovation against any potential harms and disruption. However,

  • From Jim Baker via Lawfare: Artificial Intelligence – A Counterintelligence Perspective: Part I. “…AI and the entire technological ecosystem in which it functions are highly valuable to private-sector organizations and nation-states. That means that nations will try to identify, steal, and corrupt or otherwise counteract the AI and related assets of others, and will

I swear I curate this stuff, passing over at least 20 articles and posts for every one that I mention here. It’s just a REALLY busy time for legal AI!

  • “(A) survey (of lawyers)by IQPC, ahead of its Legal AI Forum event later this year (18 -19 September in London), gathered feedback from around

Strategic Planning: If you want to know my best guess as to what’s most likely to happen next year, connect the dots from 2016 to 2017 and draw a straight line to 2018. If you want to plan for 10 years for now, good luck; I promise that between now and then there will