• Read this ==> Here’s “Stagnation And The Legal Industry (Part 2) What Real Transformative Change Could Look Like: Envisioning a radically changed future for legal services,” the followup to Ken Grady’s recent provocative piece. The first step he describes (digitization of contracts, laws, decisions, etc.) is not at all far fetched. Then Ken gets into

  • It’s great to see 2018 start off without any of the AI hype that we saw in 2017. By the way, I noticed these stories this morning (italics mine):

– Google CEO Sundar Pichai said Friday on MSNBC, “AI is one of the most important things that humanity is working on. It’s more profound

  • Must read: The Center for the Study of the Legal Profession at the Georgetown University Law Center, and Thomson Reuters Legal Executive Institute and Peer Monitor have just issued their 2018 Report on the State of the Legal Market. You can download your free copy here. It contains no fresh revelations for students of

I have often written and spoken about “The Singularity.” It may sound like science fiction, but it is real. [Check out Kurzweil’s book at the right for a deep dive.]  All serious students of AI of whom I am aware agree that at some point, computers will have more computing power than a human brain,

Today’s post is a bit long as I catch up from a vacation. There’s good stuff below. As usual, the legal-specific info comes first, then general interest AI.

  • Very interesting: Ken Grady suggests that AI may eventually replace reputation (i.e., referrals, directories, etc.) as a way to find an attorney. I’m all for anything

I’m not attending ILTA this week, but I’m reading about a hundred blog posts, tweets and press releases from Vegas every day. So far, my biggest takeaway is “ho hum.” Most of the discussion I’m seeing is the rehashing of old news (e.g., IBM’s Tuesday keynote about AI and the business of law), and the