My last post included many predictions for the year ahead, several of which were at least somewhat redundant, so unless I see something really different, I will not post such going forward. That said, these predictions about IP are from very credible sources and some offer fresh insights. From IP WatchdogLooking Forward: Predictions

There was very little real AI or blockchain news over the holidays, especially legal-related. But there was a plethora of posts reviewing 2018 and forecasting 2019 and beyond, so that’s the focus of this post. I suggest you skim these titles and then skim through the lists included in most of the posts; you’re likely

  • Will an A.I. Ever Become Sentient? “The quest for artificial intelligence could yield something that not only out-thinks humanity but can also feel like us.” Interesting (long) post here.
  • Also from Medium: Artificial Intelligence, Consciousness and the Self. This one too is interesting but rather long.
  • Capital One AI

  • It seems the FCC plans to have a rather light touch when it comes to regulating AI. “FCC chair Ajit Pai signaled that when it comes to artificial intelligence and machine learning, the FCC was smart enough to exercise regulatory humility, particularly given that the technology could revolutionize communications, but registered concern about AI

  • The data protection laws described in this post from Barnes & Thornburg are relevant to AI and blockchain. California’s New Data Protection Laws are Coming … but Colorado’s law is Already Here. “If you are a business that maintains, owns, or licenses computerized data that includes PI about Colorado residents, this new law applies

  • I can’t wait to see a demo of this. Neota Partners With Legal Consultants for AI-Based Billing Tool. “Neota Logic and legal pricing consultants Burcher Jennings and Validatum teamed up to launch Virtual Pricing Director, a collaboration years in the making.”
  • Here’s more news from Neota Logic: Legal tech education: Neota partners with

  • Here’s a deeper dive into Ron Friedmann’s argument that legal tech is in the midst of “evolution” rather than a “revolution”. It’s an interesting read, well-reasoned with several examples. “…(I)n-house counsel change buying habits slowly, which in turn slows legal innovation.” I love that he focuses on the “voice of the client,” as should we