• Baker McKenzie steps toward next-generation contract analytics. “The global law firm has partnered with ContraxSuite by LexPredict, an open-source contract analytics and legal document platform.” “The custom software reduces time spent on legal document review, making sure human talent is focused more on high-value work, he said. ContraxSuite uses AI and human input to augment and integrate the user’s experience with the document they are working on.” More here.

 

  • From Cozen O’Connor: Ford’s new AV Unit, including Argo AI, opens door to all kinds of investors. “Ford expects to invest $4 billion in its autonomous vehicle efforts, including $1 billion in Argo AI over the next five years, and has structured Ford Autonomous Vehicles to take on third-party investments.”

 

  • Looking for a new home? Revolutionary New Real Estate Shopping Platform HomLuv.com Solves Millennial Home Buying Woes. ” HomLuv.com is a revolutionary new, AI-driven home shopping platform that helps buyers find the right home in the right area and price range with customization features that they have come to expect.” Here’s the press release.

 

  • Google has promised this sort of real-time translation for a while, but it never seems ready for prime time. I look forward to reviews of this one. Xiaomi’s new feature phone does real-time voice translation in 17 different languages. “It is a 4G VoLTE-enabled feature phone that runs on a forked Android OS called Mocor 5. The highlight of the device is its AI voice feature that does real-time voice translation in 17 different languages. Using AI, the phone is said to answer questions and tell stories to young ones.”

 

  • From DLADLA Piper advises doc.ai in partnership with Anthem, Inc., to launch AI data trial. “The 12-month trial will begin in August and explore whether AI can be used to predict when people will experience allergies or allergy patterns. To do so, doc.ai and advisors from Harvard Medical School will develop a framework for using machine learning to identify predictive models for allergies based upon the phenome (e.g., age, height, weight), exposome (e.g., exposure to weather/pollution based on location) and physiome (e.g., physical activity, daily steps) data collected from participating Anthem employees and members of the public. Participants will help accelerate research and benefit from the system’s personalized health insights.”

 

  • Upcoming webinar: “Blue J Legal’s CEO, Benjamin Alarie, will give a walk-through of Employment Foresight, a new AI-powered software being used by lawyers, in-house counsel and HR professionals to accurately predict how courts will decide outcomes of challenging employment law issues like reasonable notice periods. He will use the classifier on a recently decided case and demonstrate the impacts of key factors, including which factors can swing a decision one way or another.”

 

  • This is a bit of an infomercial from iManage RAVN, but worth a quick read nonetheless. Lawyers Reaping the Rewards From AI Robots: How Artificial Intelligence is Transforming the Legal Industry. “The real threat AI robots pose is to those lawyers who, through inertia or fear, fail to use AI to help them be more productive, smarter professionals. These lawyers shouldn’t fear being replaced by AI robots but instead, by those lawyers who are using AI to deliver services better than them.”

 

Blockchain

  • Well this hits close to home. Nashville’s real estate market has been on a tear for about a decade (now somewhat constrained by lack of inventory), and now, here come the cryptocurrency investors, “a growing number of competing technology-based ventures flooding Nashville’s real estate market with millions of dollars.” “Our business is something people haven’t seen before,” said Andrew Jewett, co-CEO of Property Coin. “We are buying homes in both cash and cryptocurrencies. We love the Nashville market and want to buy $50 million in Nashville real estate in the next year.”

 

  • From White & CaseIs blockchain M&A poised to accelerate? “As the token industry continues to mature, opportunities for M&A transactions will continue to abound. Start-ups will seek exits and infrastructure players in a fractured market will be consolidated and absorbed by more efficient market leaders. And in a bid not be left behind, established market players will leverage their existing client bases to pivot toward token exposure.” “In navigating these transactions, however, it is important to remember that token technologies, while novel and potentially revolutionary, are not immune from the fundamental legal, regulatory and compliance frameworks that apply to business, and in particular financial services business, more generally.”

Must Read: If you’re especially interested in blockchain or just want to learn what it’s all about, read this fresh report from McKinsey & Co.: Blockchain beyond the hype: What is the strategic business value? (The interactive infographics are outstanding.) “Blockchain was a priority topic at Davos; a World Economic Forum survey suggested that 10 percent of global GDP will be stored on blockchain by 2027. Multiple governments have published reports on the potential implications of blockchain, and the past two years alone have seen more than half a million new publications on and 3.7 million Google search results for blockchain.” “Despite the hype, blockchain is still an immature technology, with a market that is still nascent and a clear recipe for success that has not yet emerged.” Some very interesting and practical insights and applications are discussed. Applications in 14 specific industries are discussed — not legal.

 

  • Speaking of McKinsey, this story describes the Houston Astros amazing rise from profoundly terrible to World Series champs under general manager Jeff Luhnow, formerly a management consultant for McKinsey (who surrounded himself with other nerds). “‘How do you combine soft information with hard information in a way that allows you to make the best decisions?’ asked Luhnow in 2014.” It’s an interesting story of how combining big data analytics with “gut feeling” may still be the best solution — for now. “In an era in which we are deluged by data, with the specter of job-killing artificial intelligence looming on the horizon, success isn’t a matter of man or machine, but of man plus machine. As long as man remains in charge.”

 

  • Back to blockchain: “The Association of Legal Administrators is the first membership association to become part of the Global Legal Blockchain Consortium (GLBC), joining more than 30 large companies, law firms, software companies and universities. The GLBC exists to develop standards that govern the use of blockchain technology in the business of law.” Details here.

 

  • And more blockchain, this time a two-part post regarding cryptocurrencies from Barnes & Thornburg’s Trace Schmeltz (here and here). Cryptocurrencies — An Overview of the Legal Landscape, The Risks of Investing, and the Future of the Markets. It’s a good explanation of this aspect of blockchain with an explanation of the risks in trading and potential future.

 

  • From KennedysWhy being app-athetic is bad for law firms. “One simple yet undeniably persuasive argument for law firms to cultivate legal technology is that their clients want them to.”

 

  • I expect good things from Bob Ambrogi’s new podcast, “LawNext.” He’s off to a good start with this interview of Nicole Bradick.

 

  • A couple of years ago I would have been surprised to see stories regarding AI and pot. But this morning, “Global Cannabis Applications Corp. is a global leader in designing, developing, marketing and acquiring innovative data technologies for the cannabis industry. The Citizen Green platform is the world’s first end-to-end – from patient to regulator – medical cannabis data solution. It uses six core technologies: mobile applications, artificial intelligence, regtech, smart databases, blockchain and digital reward tokens, to qualify candidates for clinical studies.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:

– Meet Sibyl AI – The New Claims Prediction System.

– US Survey Finds Big Legal Tech Knowledge Gap Among Lawyers. (I could not find the survey methodology, so caveat emptor.)

– Brummie Legal Automation Co. Clarilis Bags $4m Investment.

– Casetext and the Need for Legal AI for ‘Small Law’.  “…(S)mall firms have a double whammy of a challenge: they lack the financial resources to invest in AI research suites and they lack the additional staff resources to do that research work manually.”

 

  • Here’s some noteworthy AI-related news from the world’s biggest tech companies:

– Apple bigwigs Tom Gruber and Vipul Ved Prakash call it quits amid Siri reshuffle. (Dear Lord, I hope this means Siri with catch up to Google Assistant, or at least Alexa.)

– “(IBM) … reported second-quarter profit and revenue that topped analysts’ expectations as it benefited from growth in higher-margin businesses including cybersecurity and cloud computing.” “…IBM has been focusing on an array of new technologies ranging from artificial intelligence to cloud computing as it tries to offset weakness in its legacy business of selling hardware and software.” And this storyIs Watson enough to carry IBM?

Microsoft Will Build AI Into Everything, Says CEO Satya Nadella. “It’s going to have perception capability, language capability and autonomy that’s going to be built into the applications going forward.” Details here.

 Intel Partners with Forbes to deliver an all-new Digital Publication called ‘Forbes AI’. “You know that times are changing when Intel, who just turned 50 yesterday, is pushing hard into Artificial Intelligence. Last month during Computex, Intel’s keynote included a segment on AI for PC’s developer program as illustrated in an Intel slide below.” More here and here.

  • Facial recognition AI has been in the news and on my mind a lot lately. Of course, there are legal implications, but regardless of that aspect, these developments are a big deal of which you should be aware.

– Traveling this 4th of July? Orlando’s airport has rolled out facial recognition for all departing passengers in an attempt to speed up lines (e.g., no need to show your passport at the gate). It takes two seconds and is 99%+ accurate. (Passengers can opt out.) This story from CBS News discusses the privacy implications.

– Could this get a bit out of control? Here’s a case study: “(a)cross China, a network of 176 million surveillance cameras, expected to grow to 626 million by 2020, keeps watch on the country’s over 1.3 billion citizens.” (That’s a camera for every two people.) And, the intent is total surveillance, including inside people’s homes. “According to the official Legal Daily newspaper, the 13th Five Year Plan requires 100 percent surveillance and facial recognition coverage and total unification of its existing databases across the country. By 2020, China will have completed its nationwide facial recognition and surveillance network, achieving near-total surveillance of urban residents, including in their homes via smart TVs and smartphones.” “Soon, police and other officials will be able to monitor people’s activities in their own homes, wherever there is an internet-connected camera.”

Are they effective? Last year, “(i)t took Chinese authorities just seven minutes to locate and apprehend BBC reporter John Sudworth using its powerful network of CCTV camera and facial recognition technology.” That story here. And the case of the stolen potato here.

– “We live in a surveillance society: A U.S. citizen is reportedly captured on CCTV around 75 times per day. And that figure is even higher elsewhere in the world. Your average Brit is likely to be caught on surveillance cameras up to 300 times in the same period.” This post describes how those images can be used to spot (and even predict) crime.

This post (This Japanese AI security camera shows the future of surveillance will be automated) shows AI technology being developed in Japan to spot shoplifters and discusses the concerns about such technologies.

Facebook and others (such as Adobe) are using such recognition technologies to disrupt terrorist networks and mitigate the spread of fake news. “(T)he biggest companies extensively rely on artificial intelligence (AI). Facebook’s uses of AI include image matching. This prevents users from uploading a photo or video that matches another photo or video that has previously been identified as terrorist. Similarly, YouTube reported that 98% of the videos that it removes for violent extremism are also flagged by machine learning algorithms.”

Amazon employees (like Google’s before them) are protesting their company’s selling of such technologies to the government. Amazon workers don’t want their tech used by ICE.

Many (including me) consider this a much more benevolent identity technology: Thousands of Swedes are inserting microchips into themselves – here’s why.

 

 

  • “Mishcon de Reya has joined the ranks of law firms with high-level in-house data science capability, hiring UCL computer scientist Alastair Moore as head of analytics and machine learning.

 

  • From O’MelvenyFTC Seeking Input on Topics to be Explored at Public Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century. Topics include: “(t)he consumer welfare implications associated with the use of algorithmic decision tools, artificial intelligence, and predictive analytics.”

 

  • Here, from Digital Journal, is a discussion of the general ways law firms are using AI: Q&A: How technology is shaking up legal firms.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer, Wolters Kluwer Joins Global Legal Blockchain Consortium. “The GLBC is a global network of key stakeholders in the legal industry, working toward rules for the standardisation, governance, and application of blockchain and related technologies in the global legal system. Its mission is ‘enhance the security, privacy, productivity, and interoperability of the legal technology ecosystem’.”

– More from Artificial Lawyer about Blockchain hereEY + Microsoft Enter the Blockchain IP + Royalties Sector. “Big Four firm EY and Microsoft have launched a blockchain solution for content rights and royalties management, joining a growing group of legal tech start-ups – which are operating at a much smaller scale – that have also developed similar blockchain-based IP solutions.”

 

  • Also from Artificial Lawyer: Global AI Governance Group: ‘AI Decisions Must Track Back to Someone’. “A newly launched AI Global Governance commission (AIGG), tasked with forming links with politicians and governments around the world to help develop and harmonise rules on the use of AI, has suggested that at least one key regulation should be that any decisions made by an AI system ‘must be tracked back to a person or an organisation’.”

This Artificial Lawyer interview with Kira’s Noah Waisberg is more than just an overview of Kira’s rapid growth; it has good insights into doc review generally.

 

  • Here’s a somewhat entertaining look at how law firms are engaging AI vendors. Buying AI for Law Firms: Like a Trip to the Auto Show.

 

  • From Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A. via JDSupraShould Law Firms Embrace Artificial Intelligence and R&D Labs? “Change is difficult, especially in the legal market. Yet a firm’s willingness to think differently reflects its ability to adapt, to ensure sustainability for itself, and to help solve that industrywide puzzle.”

 

  • This article from the NYT (Is There a Smarter Path to Artificial Intelligence? Some Experts Hope So) may sound negative as to Machine Learning being over-hyped, but it positively presents other types of AI. It’s a good read.

 

  • Also somewhat negative is this post from MIT about the AI threat: “AI programs capable of perceiving the real world, interacting with it, and learning about it might eventually become far better at reasoning and even communicating. ‘If you solve manipulation in its fullest,’ Abbeel says, ‘you’ll probably have built something that’s pretty close to full, human-level intelligence’.”

AI Funding:

– Influential Raises $12 Mn Funding To Fuel Its Artificial intelligence Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) Platform.

From BloombergBillionaire Who Helped Dark Knight Rise Goes All-In on AI.

From Artificial Lawyer: “Brazilian legal tech platform, Juridoc, is launching a fundraising round on Latin America’s Kria crowdfunding site.” “Juridoc’s founder, Maxime Troubat, is seeking to raise R$550,000 in total, which is about US$150,000, with R$300,000 coming from individuals making an investment via Kria to build out the platform for the Brazilian legal market.”

Also from Artificial Lawyer‘Legal AI is an Arms Race and the $17.5m Will Help Us Win It’ – Eigen.

 BEIJING – “JD.com, one of China’s largest E-commerce firms, has announced that Google are [sic] set to invest around US$550 million in the company in order to advance a strategic partnership with the aim of developing a ‘personalised and frictionless’ consumer experience.”

Whatever happened to all of the rush of law firms to go public? Well, there’s this: “In line with its strategy of ‘doing things differently’ and in order to help increase its investment in technology and connected services, DWF may shortly become the largest law firm to float on the London Stock Market with a valuation of up to £1bn.”

 

Some blockchain news bits:

This is an interesting podcast from Child & Child: “Artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain and smart contracts are the buzzwords of the moment. And some reckon that their combined force could be about to disrupt the legal profession as we know it.”

– Lots of legal implications here: ‘Walk In With Your Eyes Open’: Navigating Blockchain And CRE (Commercial Real Estate.)

From Global Banking and Finance ReviewArtificial Intelligence (AI) Takes a Giant Leap Forward With Blockchain Infusion. “As Artificial Intelligence advances, the need for enhanced security is becoming apparent and therefore Blockchain is becoming more common in the market.”

This 10-minute video Australian law firm, Corrs Chambers Westgarth shows how a real estate transaction can be executed on the Ethereum blockchain.

 

  • From ProskauerUnited States: AI: Next Big Thing Or Next Big Lawsuit? “AI is prone to bias and discrimination in employment decisions. The reasons for this are twofold. First, AI is only as objective as the engineers who coded it. As such, intrinsic biases can make their way into code, which the AI program’s analyses may reflect. Second, AI learns from the data it is fed. The data, however, often include implicit biases from the real world that AI may perpetuate.”

 

And… “In one of those unexpected moments of synchronicity, Canada has also just launched a major research project into AI and justice that, like the UK’s commission on algorithms and justice that was launched yesterday by the Law Society, may also produce recommendations on ethics and regulation of the technology, with a central aim to increase access to justice through the use of AI.”

 

  • “It’s all about the data” is a phrase I often repeat in my presentations on AI, and this post from Above the Law underscores the point. What Makes Good Legal AI? Quality Data.

 

  • Here, also from Above the Law, is a deep dive into The Ethical Implications of Artificial Intelligence. “Artificial intelligence is transforming the legal profession — and that includes legal ethics. AI and similar cutting-edge technologies raise many complex ethical issues and challenges that lawyers ignore at their peril. At the same time, AI also holds out the promise of helping lawyers to meet their ethical obligations, serve their clients more effectively, and promote access to justice and the rule of law.”

 

  • Here’s a good discussion of where we are today vis-a-vis reaching Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), in many ways AI’s Holy Grail. “A machine with true AGI would be able to perform any intellectual task a human being can. This means if you asked a robot with AGI to hammer a nail, it wouldn’t need to be programmed to do so. It would try — and possibly fail — on its own. It would be able to learn from its mistakes and try until it got it right.”
  • From Bloomberg Law: “Securitization specialists at law firms including Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP and DLA Piper say the first blockchain-based transactions could come as early as this year. “There’s a lot of hype about blockchain, but I am working on actual deals right now,” said Matthew Duncan, a partner and head of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius’s London-based securitization practice, who expects to see the first blockchain securitization by mid-2019. “Securitization will change fundamentally.””

 

  • And here’s more about blockchain from Artificial Lawyer: Smart Contract Group, Accord Project, Links with R3’s Corda Blockchain.

 

“Robots have stimulated the imagination of human beings for several thousand years: artificial servants and companions seem to be present as far back as in the ancient Greek myths. To a great extent, these myths are now becoming reality, with the effect that fundamental concepts of law must be revisited in light of recent and rapid technological developments. It remains to be seen how quickly law will follow technology… and to what extent lawyers themselves will be replaced by robots.”

 

  • Press release: Cooley Partner Named to Inaugural European Commission Expert Group on Liability and New Technologies.

 

  • Here’s an interesting post about the growth of legal tech (including AI) in Hong Kong. Hong Kong Legal Tech Market is Booming.

 

Since today is a bit light on legal AI news, here’s some info to catch you up on AI in the rest of the world:

  • From Finextra: “AiX, the artificial intelligence broker, announces today that it has completed the first ever trade brokered by an AI powered chatbot. The trade is the first of its kind to use AI technology instead of the traditional human brokerage model, completing a successful cryptocurrency transaction between Rockwell Capital Management and TLDR Capital.”

 

  • The international AI race: from the Financial Times: “In the race to master artificial intelligence, Europe is a clear laggard. The US and China dominate AI in everything from research to investment. Whereas Europe spent about $3bn-$4bn on AI in 2016, investment in North America was up to $23bn, according to McKinsey Global Institute.”

 

  • For more than a year I have been writing about the tens of thousands of news stories being composed by AI. During that time they have become more sophisticated. Here‘s a bit of an update. (This is about “artificial” but not “fake” news.)

 

  • It’s not just law firms that struggle to achieve greater diversity. Google Employees and Investors Joined Forces to Demand More Diversity. Why Even That Novel Approach Failed. Even the employees that caused Google to drop a major government/defense contract couldn’t clear the diversity hurtle. This story has been widely covered. Here’s the post from Fortune.

“Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin may hold supervoting rights, making these proposals untenable in practice, but they can’t stop this dirty laundry being aired in public—particularly when employees and shareholders join forces. At some point, something has to give. And not just a “more inclusive vegan salad” emoji.”

 

  • I guess if we’re going to really understand how dark/malevolent AI can go, we need to take it there and examine the result. So, MIT scientists create world’s first ‘psychopath’ AI and it’s really spooky. Creepy details here.

 

  • Speaking of creepy, it’s pretty horrifying to imagine the old white guys in our Congress, mainly Luddites, writing the laws that will govern our AI and other tech. Consider this post from the Washington Post‘I can understand about 50 percent of the things you say’: How Congress is struggling to get smart on tech. “(P)olicymakers themselves admit they aren’t fully prepared to deal with the issues.”

The kickoff presentations for Apple’s 2018 Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) was a ho-hum affair. Most interesting:

  • Apple continues to stress its superiority to Google and Amazon regarding consumer privacy. Especially when compared to Facebook.
  • Siri, now siri-ously lagging behind Alexa and Google Assistant, is promised to get smarter with the release of iOS 12. The competition will not be standing still while we await that release.
  • The most full-on AI news was the improvements to the augmented reality functions. Again, it looks good in demo, but it will be a while before we can really use it.
  • No hardware announcements.

 

  • Interesting blockchain news from K&L Gates: Understanding the Effect of Wyoming’s Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Legislation. “As companies examine whether the recent Wyoming amendments provide them with any opportunities, they must carefully consider the actual reach and implications of the amendments. ICO issuers, for example, should carefully consider whether their token will qualify under Wyoming’s narrow exemption, the risk of implicating federal securities laws, and whether the benefits of limiting their issuance to Wyoming residents achieve their goals for the ICO.”

 

  • In the course of a presentation regarding AI and blockchain to a group of Real Estate and Construction professionals last week, I mentioned that blockchain has the potential to upend several areas related to their profession. To wit:

– Supply chain management
– Inspections
– Contracts/leases
– Estimating/budgeting/financial models
– Designs/drawings
– Multiple listing services (MLS)
– Title insurance
– Escrow
– 3rd world land registry
– Generic corporate needs (e.g., audits [automatic and continuous], remittances)

This post by Muthaura Mugambi Ayugi & Njonjo Advocates gets deeper into the subject internationally, and with a focus on Kenya.

And this postThe future of artificial intelligence in real estate transactions by Jan Hoffmeister of Drooms digs into the impact Big Data will have on the real estate industry in Europe. It is, in part, based on a survey Drooms that I have been unable to find, and thus cannot comment on the methodology. “AI complements those elements and adds huge value by making real estate processes much more automated, efficient and cost-effective.”

 

  • From Foley & Lardner: Mobility Policy and Regulation – Finding the Imperfect Solution. The post reports on the Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce’s Mackinac Policy Conference. Takeaways include, “…there is a huge gap between connected and autonomous driving technology and its regulation – a gap that needs to be closed in a flexible way – but seeking a perfect, zero-defect outcome is both unrealistic and counterproductive.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:

– David Gingell, CMO of Seal Software predicts “there are two developments in computing that are starting to have a significant impact on the lawyer of the future: artificial intelligence (AI) and smart contracting.”

– On a somewhat related note, Seal has just released V.6 of its legal AI analysis system. Features, etc. here.

– “Juridoc, (is poised to become) the Brazilian answer to the likes of LegalZoom with added legal analytics, plus a legal bot based on IBM Watson technology and an automated document marketplace as well.” More here.

 

  • “From this autumn final year students at the University of Manchester will be able to take a new optional module called ‘Legal Tech and Access to Justice’ that is being delivered in partnership with AI company Neota Logic and magic circle law firm Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer.” Much more here.
  • I expect some defense work will be required here: “vpnMentor ran a test of over 2,500 websites in the EU that will need to follow the new GDPR regulations and found that as little as 34% of websites are currently compliant. Most of the websites we checked either had old privacy policies, and in some cases no privacy policy at all, and are in no way ready for the stricter privacy guidelines.” Breakdown by country here.

 

  • From Insurance Edge: Human Vs AI: Where Will Blame Lie in Autonomous Vehicle Accidents?

 

  • From McDermottSurfing “Tech’s Next Big Wave”: Navigating the Legal Challenges in Digital Health. “(There are) myriad, complex legal challenges that must be addressed at the earliest stages of the planning process and the intensifying interest of government oversight and enforcement bodies.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:

– Taylor Wessing, Bakers + MDR Partner with LitiGate AI Startup, “to help develop its AI-driven research and argument assessment platform.” Link to story.

– “UK’s HM Courts & Tribunals Service has rolled out an online divorce application platform, which should reduce stress for parties involved and also – and this is the key bit – reduce the cost of a key justice process.” Good news for A2J here.

This is an interesting story about Thomson Reuters taking a step into blockchain contracts via Kleros. “…(F)or those who are already familiar with blockchain technology and feel comfortable with the idea of crowdsourced justice this could be an effective means of dispute resolution.”

 

  • White House to hold artificial intelligence meeting with companies. “The White House will convene a meeting on Thursday on the future of artificial intelligence in U.S. industry with major companies including Facebook Inc, Amazon.com Inc, Google parent Alphabet Inc and Oracle Corp as well as senior government officials.” “The goal is to convene industry experts to advise the federal government on what regulations will be appropriate for the coming wave of artificial intelligence and machine learning technology.” Details here and here.

 

  • This is an overview of the ways AI can benefit HR management in almost any organization.

 

  • Microsoft Commits $25 Million to ‘AI for Accessibility’. Details here.

 

  • Google news:

Google is relaunching its news site with lots more artificial intelligence as part of its effort to fight fake news. “Today we’re rolling out an all new Google News, which uses the best of artificial intelligence to find the best of human intelligence—the great reporting done by journalists around the globe.” “Using real-time AI/ML to organize the news.” Details here and here.

– Google goes all-in on artificial intelligence, renames research division Google AI. Details here.

  • From Artificial Lawyer: Thomson Reuters is again turning to AI tools, now with a contract remediation system to help companies review and repaper legal agreements ahead of Brexit. In this case it will be using AI company Logical Construct, which leverages a combination of natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning techniques to achieve its extraction results.

 

  • From Patent Docs: FDA Permits Marketing of First AI-based Medical Device; Signals Fast Track Approach to Artificial Intelligence.

 

  • SINGAPORE (Reuters) – In the not too distant future, surveillance cameras sitting atop over 100,000 lampposts in Singapore could help authorities pick out and recognize faces in crowds across the island-state. Some top officials in Singapore played down the privacy concerns. Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said last week that the Smart Nation project was aimed at improving people’s lives and that he did not want it done in a way “which is overbearing, which is intrusive, which is unethical”.

 

  • Google and AI Ethics: “After it emerged last month that Google was working with the Defense Department on a project for analyzing drone footage using “artificial intelligence” techniques, Google’s employees were not happy.” “(M)ore than 3,000 of the employees signed a letter to CEO Sundar Pichai, demanding that the company scrap the deal.” “Google Cloud chief Diane Greene … told employees Google was ‘drafting a set of ethical principles to guide the company’s use of its technology and products.’” “…Greene promised Google wouldn’t sign up for any further work on ‘Maven’ or similar projects without having such principles in place, and she was sorry the Maven contract had been signed without these internal guidelines having been formulated.”

 

  • House of Representatives Hearing: GAME CHANGERS: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PART III, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY, Subcommittee on Information Technology, APRIL 18, 2018 2:00 PM, 2154 RAYBURN HOB.
  • ICYMI, over the weekend, John Oliver (HBO’s Last Week Tonight) offered this entertaining warning about investing in cryptocurrencies. Stick around for the “special guest.” (NSFW)

 

  • From Stanford Law Fellow Eran Kahana, his Top 10 intriguing issues regarding AI and the law. These are all concerning the ‘practice’ (as opposed to ‘business’) of law.

 

  • Ken Grady’s recent absence from posting has provided a bit more perspective about technology and change in the legal industry. This sobering post includes: “(c)ertainly, some software does amazing things and represents state-of-the-art applications in law. But, that is not the issue. The issue is whether we have updated the fundamental way law is practiced. The answer is a resounding ‘no’.” Ken recalls, “the CLO of one of the Big Four accounting firms came to me and said, ‘We both know the real problem here. We have the tools and ways to radically change legal services for the better. That isn’t the issue. The real issue is that those in the industry are not ready to accept change.’ He was right then and would still be right today.”

He closes this essay with, “(i)In my next post on this topic, I’ll give a glimpse of what that real change could look like.” I certainly look forward to it.

 

  • Artificial Lawyer reports that “London-based law firm, BLP, … has claimed what it believes to be a first for the English legal system by utilising machine learning predictive coding ‘through to full trial’, in what could be a watershed moment for the technology in the UK.”

 

 

  • From Bryan Cave: “Hong Kong Managing Partner Kristi Swartz will present March 23 at the Asia Asset Management Roundtable Seminar, “The Inaugural Seminar on Digital Asset Management – Evolution or Revolution?” Panelists will discuss the future of asset management with fintech and blockchain, how artificial intelligence and machine learning are transforming financial services, cyber security, and the issues and challenges associated with robo advisers in Asia.”

 

Speaking of AI and the stock market, “Nasdaq Analytics Hub launched long signals on U.S. stocks, derived from an Artificial Intelligence technique called Ensemble Voting.”

 

  • While Musk continues to warn of the existential threat posed by AI, the EU has established a commission calling “for a wide, open and inclusive discussion on how to use and develop artificial intelligence both successfully and ethically sound.”

 

  • “Google, which recently announced a multiyear sponsorship deal making it “The Official Cloud of the NCAA,” has begun the first ad campaign for its cloud computing product with commercials in March Madness coverage.”

 

  • Finally, from the ‘creepy AI’ desk: “Staqu’s AI-powered ‘Smart Glass‘ is capable of a hybrid of speech and image recognition and can warn the law-abiding citizens against any potential threat around them.”
  • This seems to be promising an awful lot. I have not investigated, but will look for more information. For now, here’s part of the post:

Leading artificial intelligence company iFlytek Co Ltd is developing an AI-enabled system to assist courts in judging criminal cases….(T)he company was authorized by the Ministry of Science and Technology to build China’s first national laboratory for cognitive intelligence. The company, affiliated with the University of Science and Technology of China, a premier school in the country, is partnering with Shanghai High People’s Court to test the smart trial system. “We now can use AI to help judges review four types of cases, namely murder, theft, telecom fraud and illegal fundraising,” said Liu Qingfeng, chairman of iFlytek. “The number will jump to 79 types by the end of this year,” he said. According to Liu, who is also a deputy to the 13th National People’s Congress, the AI system can automatically judge whether the evidences are contradictory or complete enough to support a sentence, as well as which laws and regulations can be used, how previous similar cases are tried and suggest an appropriate sentence for reference. … “The accuracy of the system reaches 97 percent, higher than the 80 percent in Europe,” he said, “This is not a single skill, but a full set of capabilities involving voice recognition, big data, semantic reasoning, knowledge mining and incremental learning.”

 

  • From Reuters, this very large AI acquisition. “S&P Global Inc (SPGI.N) will buy artificial intelligence and analytics firm Kensho Technologies Inc for about $550 million in cash and shares, the ratings agency said on Tuesday.”

 

 

  • From Rhonda Shirreff of Norton Rose Canada: “Will Artificial Intelligence Need Human Rights Training? Despite all of the advances in the field of artificial intelligence (AI), experts reveal that these technologies are not immune from some of the less-than-admirable tendencies which afflict humans.” Responsibilities of employers are discussed.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer, here are some useful ideas around technology and the customer experience the legal industry can adapt from the experience of insurers.

 

  • More (creepy?) AI for your home. The new Google Nest doorbell cam (Nest Hello) will recognize the faces of your visitors and tell you who’s at the door. First, you need to set up the faces.

 

  • And still even more (creepy) AI — literally reading your mind. “Think that Google’s search algorithms are good at reading your mind? That’s nothing compared to a new artificial intelligence research project coming out of Japan, which can analyze a person’s brain scans and provide a written description of what they have been looking at. To generate its captions, the artificial intelligence is given an fMRI brain scan image, taken while a person is looking at a picture. It then generates a written description of what they think the person was viewing. An illustration of the level of complexity it can offer is: “A dog is sitting on the floor in front of an open door” or “a group of people standing on the beach.” Both of those turn out to be absolutely accurate.”