Global Legal Blockchain Consortium

  • This story has received VERY wide coverage, with headlines including:

Stephen Schwarzman Makes Anchor Gift For New $1 Billion School Of Artificial Intelligence At MIT;

MIT announces $1b outlay for study of artificial intelligence, computing; 

M.I.T. Plans College for Artificial Intelligence, Backed by $1 Billion;

MIT commits $1 billion to make AI part of every graduate’s education;

M.I.T. wants to build an AI-focused college using a ‘planned investment’ of $1 billion.

From Simpson Thatcher: “The Firm represented Blackstone Chairman and CEO Stephen A. Schwarzman’s foundation in connection with the foundation’s $350 million gift to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The gift is a portion of a $1 billion investment to establish a college for computing and artificial intelligence. The college, called the M.I.T. Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, will address the global opportunities and challenges presented by the prevalence of computing and the rise of artificial intelligence.”

Coverage herehereherehere and here.

 

  • William Hays Weissman of Littler postedWhy Robot Taxes Won’t Work. Several arguments to support the thesis are presented, including: “… from a tax administration perspective, robots pay no income tax because they do not earn income, pay no sales tax because they do not purchase items, and pay no property tax because they do not own anything”

 

  • Knobbe Martens publishedFDA Expresses Priorities for Clinical Trial Efficiency, Artificial Intelligence. “According to (FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.), clinical trials “are becoming more costly and complex to administer” while “new technologies and sources of data and analysis make better approaches possible.” In order to take advantage of these better approaches, Gottlieb pointed to the FDA’s Breakthrough Devices Draft Guidance, which proposes streamlined procedures to develop flexible clinical trial designs for important medical devices. This will allow the FDA to “evaluate . . . innovative devices more efficiently.” Six breakthrough devices have already been cleared using this program.”

 

  • From GoodwinTreasury Department Imposes Mandatory Filing Requirement on Parties to Certain Foreign Investments in U.S. Critical Technology Companies. “‘Emerging and foundational technologies’ soon to be controlled pursuant to a separate, interagency process underway and expected to target technologies not currently subject to ITAR or EAR controls, possibly including technologies relating to artificial intelligence, robotics, cybersecurity, advanced materials, telecommunications, and biomedicine, among others.”

 

  • From Osborne ClarkeShaping future competition law enforcement in digital markets | Furman review calls for evidence. “The first set of questions in the call for evidence asks about the substantive analysis of competition in digital markets and considers: … artificial intelligence tools and their impact on competition, including whether algorithmic pricing raises new competition concerns.”

 

  • Can artificial intelligence change construction? “As IBM’s Watson adds its computational power to construction sites, tech sees an industry in need of an upgrade.” “On especially complicated projects, Fluor (a global engineering and construction company) will begin using two new tools, the EPC Project Health Diagnostics and the Market Dynamics/Spend Analytics, to make sense of the thousands of data points found on a crowded construction site. Constant analysis will help forecast issues before they show up, and automate how materials and workers are distributed.” “Fortune found many tech firms investing billions in construction tech firms, including Oracle, which purchased Aconex for $1.2 billion in February, and Trimble, which bought Viewpoint for $1.2 billion in April.” Much more here.

 

  • Mintz publishedStrategies to Unlock AI’s Potential in Health Care, a Mintz Series. “The Journal of the American Medical Association in its September 18, 2018 issue included four articles on deep learning and Artificial Intelligence (AI). In one of several viewpoint pieces, On the Prospects for a (Deep) Learning Health Care System, the author’s conclusions aptly describe why health care providers, entrepreneurs, investors and even regulators are so enthusiastic about the use of AI in health care: Pressures to deploy deep learning and a range of tools derived from modern data science will be relentless, given the extraordinarily rich information now available to characterize and follow vast numbers of patients, the ongoing challenges of making sense of the complexity of human biology and health care systems, and the potential for smart information technology to support tomorrow’s clinicians in the provision of safe, effective, efficient, and humanistic care.”

 

  •  of Hunton postedLawyering Cashierless Technologies. “There is no doubt that there’s a revolution coming to the way consumers buy goods at brick and mortar stores as retailers seek to better meet customers’ need for speed and create novel shopping experiences. However, with this revolution comes new risks. There are a wide range of potential issues that retailers should consider before launching cashierless technology….”

 

  • Press releaseFirst-Ever Virtual Law Firm Puts Clients First. “By using Artificial Intelligence and robots, they’re (“2nd.law”) able to provide legal services for their clients at a steeply discounted price — up to 75% lower than the rates and fees that traditional firms offer — all while putting client relationships first.”

 

  • Lloyd Langenhoven of Herbert Smith Freehills posted this thoughtful piece: The symbiotic relationship between lawyer and legal tech. “Continued and efficient success for the legal profession, on both a macro and micro scale, lies in the ability of the profession to foster a symbiotic relationship between legal technology, client’s expectations and traditional legal knowledge. The future looks bright and exciting for the legal profession and it is about time our professional dusted the cobwebs off and donned a new, futuristic suit.”

 

  • This article from The Law Society Gazette frequently cites Brown Rudnick’s Nicholas Tse: IBA Rome: Artificial intelligence must mean strict liability – and higher insurance premiums. “‘The law needs to try not to multiply problems of dealing with AI and should not invest AI with legal personality,’ he told a session moderated by Law Society president Christina Blacklaws. ‘The work of the law is to try and be pragmatic, ensuring accountability while not stifling progress.’”

 

  • This from an associate at a major City law firm: “For at least a year I have been reading in the legal press how wonderful corporate law firms are with technology and how their pioneering work with artificial intelligence is unleashing a ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’/’profound paradigm shift’/’New Law 2.0 era’/insert buzz-term of choice that will fundamentally change the profession. But when I look around all I can see is some new laptops and phones given to us by our supposedly tech-savvy firms. This despite my own employer aggressively marketing itself as some kind of futuristic Silicon Valley-style start-up.”

 

  • From Lawyerist.comHow an Online Game Can Help AI Address Access to Justice (A2J). “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that the majority of those in possession of legal problems, remain in want of solutions.1 Also, ROBOTS!  Ergo, we should throw AI at A2J. There is considerably less consensus, however, on how (or why exactly) this should be done. But don’t worry! There’s an app/game for that, and it let’s you train artificial intelligence to help address access-to-justice issues.”

 

  • Holly Urban, CEO at EffortlessLegal posted: Artificial Intelligence: A Litigator’s New Best Friend? “This article is intended to help litigation attorneys looking to utilize AI to maximize their outcomes with minimal additional effort or expense.” In conclusion, like several before her, she reminds us: “As the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct states, ‘To maintain the requisite knowledge and skill, a lawyer should keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice, including the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology, engage in continuing study and education and comply with all continuing legal education requirements to which the lawyer is subject.'”

 

  • This story has been widely reported: Stephen Hawking feared race of ‘superhumans’ able to manipulate their own DNA. “Before he died in March, the Cambridge University professor predicted that people this century would gain the capacity to edit human traits such as intelligence and aggression. And he worried that the capacity for genetic engineering would be concentrated in the hands of the wealthy. Hawking mulled this future in a set of essays and articles being published posthumously Tuesday as ‘Brief Answers to the Big Questions….‘” “Once such superhumans appear, there are going to be significant political problems with the unimproved humans, who won’t be able to compete.” More coverage here and here.

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

 

  • Suffolk Law School Uses Reddit to Create Legal Question A2J Taxonomy. “A collaboration of Suffolk Law School’s Legal Innovation and Technology Lab in the US and Stanford Law School’s Legal Design Lab with funding from The Pew Charitable Trusts is taking legal questions from consumers posted on social media site Reddit, and using them to create a taxonomy of legal issues to help train A2J tech applications. Sounds unusual? At first it does, but when you look deeper it all makes sense. David Colarusso,  Director of Suffolk University Law School’s Legal Innovation and Technology Lab, explained to Artificial Lawyer what this is all about.” Here‘s the post.

 

  • I particularly enjoyed this opinion piece by the founder of Artificial Lawyer, Richard Tromans: The Politics of Legal Tech – Progressives vs Conservatives. “There are clearly then a wide range of views and goals when it comes to legal tech. We are not all on the same page. There are divisions. There are competing narratives. There is a battle of ideas to see which ones win out and different people, firms and organisations are arguing for different points of view. The legal tech world is, in a word, political.”

 

Blockchain

  • The state of blockchain: 11 stats. “How many CIOs are actively adopting or experimenting with blockchain? Dig into telling data from multiple sources.” Here’s the story from The Enterprisers Project.

  • This from Artificial Lawyer: Integra Ledger Launches Tools to Add Blockchain Tech to All Legal Software.

 

  • This surprised me. I post a lot about Silicon Valley, Shanghai, London, etc. as AI hubs. Turns out NYC is doing pretty well. See this post (New York Is the Capital of a Booming Artificial Intelligence Industry) from Bloomberg. “If you’re looking to get into AI, set your sights on New York, according to the report. Surprisingly, New York—not San Francisco—boasts the highest percentage of AI and machine learning positions in a single metro area, with more than 11 percent of national job postings.”

 

  • AALL Annual Meeting Session Recap: Powered by AI, Built in the Law Library. “Fastcase CEO Ed Walters has had enough with the magic and the unicorns and the hype surrounding artificial intelligence, or AI.  He urged attendees at the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) session, “Powered by AI, Built in the Law Library,” to think of AI like pivot tables in Excel: they’re just tools. They’re not magic, but they can be to those who don’t understand them.” Good insights and examples in this piece.

 

  • The folks at Artificial Lawyer prepared this recapILTACon 2018 – Legal AI Comes of Age. “This time the most remarkable thing at ILTACon was how accepted it has all become, which in turn also signalled a far more mature understanding of the tech involved and the questions that needed to be grappled with. In short, the debate has moved on now to substantive issues around data quality needs for NLP training and real opportunities grounded in discussions around improvements to profit margins.” Definitely worth reading. (Blockchain is included.)

 

  • This summary (Changes to Law Firm Business Model Could Spur Innovation) of an ILTACON 2018 keynote panel includes some examples of modest inovation.

 

  • Also from ILTACON, via law.com, these four “Stories of Innovation: The Power of Personal Stories to Influence Behavior Change.” The examples are from Orrick, Troutman Sauders, Littler Mendelson, and Freshfields. Some funny, all interesting.

 

  • From Reed SmithProposed amendments to the ePrivacy Regulation. “The ePR will repeal and replace the Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive 2002/58/EC. The ePR will align Europe’s ePrivacy regime more closely with privacy regime set out in the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The GDPR took effect on 25 May 2018.” Amendments to three articles are discussed.

 

  • On Fridays, I try to provide some thought pieces and primer sorts of stuff. So, here’s Artificial intelligence definitions – upgrade your AI IQ, a good, pretty comprehensive, set of introductory definitions.

 

  • From Casepoint’s David Carns, here’s an interesting overview of the general implications of legal tech for “Law 3.0.” “(W)hile the Law 3.0 technology stack enables the digital transformation of real business processes and workflows, it does not replace those processes and workflows. It enhances them. It gives legal practitioners a big boost in speed and efficiency, but it will never replace the people who are practicing law.” Hmmm. Some might disagree.

 

Blockchain

  • “Commonwealth Bank of Australia and the World Bank have claimed the world’s first bond to be created, allocated, transferred, and managed via blockchain.” “According to CBA, the “$AUD Kangaroo bond”, Blockchain Offered New Debt Instrument (bond-i), which uses a private Ethereum blockchain, was created, allocated, transferred, and managed through its life cycle solely using distributed ledger technology. The two-year bond raised AU$110 million.” More here.

 

  • From Artificial LawyerPwC Legal Switzerland Joins the Global Legal Blockchain Consortium. “PwC Legal Switzerland has been exploring the impact of blockchain technology on various industries and ‘recognises the transformative potential of blockchain in the legal sector’.”

 

  • From Loeb & Loeb: Mini Law Lesson: What the Heck is Blockchain? It’s a five-minute video. (Focus on the content, not the production values.) Very high level.

 

  • Bob Ambrogi posted this Access-to-Justice news: Legaler Raises $1.5M To Build Blockchain To Help Bridge Justice Gap. Australia seems to do more than just about any other country re A2J tech.

 

  • Here’s Volume 34 of K&L Gates’ Blockchain Energizer. If you’re really interested in news about blockchain and law, you should be following these posts.

 

  • DWF’s Dominic Watkins contributed this brief post to the UK’s Food ManufactureLegal implications as blockchain disrupts food.

Must Read: If you’re especially interested in blockchain or just want to learn what it’s all about, read this fresh report from McKinsey & Co.: Blockchain beyond the hype: What is the strategic business value? (The interactive infographics are outstanding.) “Blockchain was a priority topic at Davos; a World Economic Forum survey suggested that 10 percent of global GDP will be stored on blockchain by 2027. Multiple governments have published reports on the potential implications of blockchain, and the past two years alone have seen more than half a million new publications on and 3.7 million Google search results for blockchain.” “Despite the hype, blockchain is still an immature technology, with a market that is still nascent and a clear recipe for success that has not yet emerged.” Some very interesting and practical insights and applications are discussed. Applications in 14 specific industries are discussed — not legal.

 

  • Speaking of McKinsey, this story describes the Houston Astros amazing rise from profoundly terrible to World Series champs under general manager Jeff Luhnow, formerly a management consultant for McKinsey (who surrounded himself with other nerds). “‘How do you combine soft information with hard information in a way that allows you to make the best decisions?’ asked Luhnow in 2014.” It’s an interesting story of how combining big data analytics with “gut feeling” may still be the best solution — for now. “In an era in which we are deluged by data, with the specter of job-killing artificial intelligence looming on the horizon, success isn’t a matter of man or machine, but of man plus machine. As long as man remains in charge.”

 

  • Back to blockchain: “The Association of Legal Administrators is the first membership association to become part of the Global Legal Blockchain Consortium (GLBC), joining more than 30 large companies, law firms, software companies and universities. The GLBC exists to develop standards that govern the use of blockchain technology in the business of law.” Details here.

 

  • And more blockchain, this time a two-part post regarding cryptocurrencies from Barnes & Thornburg’s Trace Schmeltz (here and here). Cryptocurrencies — An Overview of the Legal Landscape, The Risks of Investing, and the Future of the Markets. It’s a good explanation of this aspect of blockchain with an explanation of the risks in trading and potential future.

 

  • From KennedysWhy being app-athetic is bad for law firms. “One simple yet undeniably persuasive argument for law firms to cultivate legal technology is that their clients want them to.”

 

  • I expect good things from Bob Ambrogi’s new podcast, “LawNext.” He’s off to a good start with this interview of Nicole Bradick.

 

  • A couple of years ago I would have been surprised to see stories regarding AI and pot. But this morning, “Global Cannabis Applications Corp. is a global leader in designing, developing, marketing and acquiring innovative data technologies for the cannabis industry. The Citizen Green platform is the world’s first end-to-end – from patient to regulator – medical cannabis data solution. It uses six core technologies: mobile applications, artificial intelligence, regtech, smart databases, blockchain and digital reward tokens, to qualify candidates for clinical studies.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:

– Meet Sibyl AI – The New Claims Prediction System.

– US Survey Finds Big Legal Tech Knowledge Gap Among Lawyers. (I could not find the survey methodology, so caveat emptor.)

– Brummie Legal Automation Co. Clarilis Bags $4m Investment.

– Casetext and the Need for Legal AI for ‘Small Law’.  “…(S)mall firms have a double whammy of a challenge: they lack the financial resources to invest in AI research suites and they lack the additional staff resources to do that research work manually.”

 

  • Here’s some noteworthy AI-related news from the world’s biggest tech companies:

– Apple bigwigs Tom Gruber and Vipul Ved Prakash call it quits amid Siri reshuffle. (Dear Lord, I hope this means Siri with catch up to Google Assistant, or at least Alexa.)

– “(IBM) … reported second-quarter profit and revenue that topped analysts’ expectations as it benefited from growth in higher-margin businesses including cybersecurity and cloud computing.” “…IBM has been focusing on an array of new technologies ranging from artificial intelligence to cloud computing as it tries to offset weakness in its legacy business of selling hardware and software.” And this storyIs Watson enough to carry IBM?

Microsoft Will Build AI Into Everything, Says CEO Satya Nadella. “It’s going to have perception capability, language capability and autonomy that’s going to be built into the applications going forward.” Details here.

 Intel Partners with Forbes to deliver an all-new Digital Publication called ‘Forbes AI’. “You know that times are changing when Intel, who just turned 50 yesterday, is pushing hard into Artificial Intelligence. Last month during Computex, Intel’s keynote included a segment on AI for PC’s developer program as illustrated in an Intel slide below.” More here and here.

  • The big news yesterday was Thomson Reuters’ launch of “…Westlaw Edge, an updated, artificial intelligence-assisted legal research platform. The updates include new warnings for invalid or questionable law, litigation analytics, a tool to analyze statutory changes and an improved AI-enhanced search called WestSearch Plus.” Here’s their video promo piece, and here the press release. Kudos to Thomson Reuters for garnering so much coverage, such as here and here. This early review by Bob Ambrogi is especially interesting, as is this from Jean O’Grady.

At the same time, Artificial Lawyer has this coverage of Eikon Digest, Thomson Reuters’ “new algorithmic research service aimed at the financial sector, in a move that shows the increasing use of machine learning, NLP and related tech.”

 

  • Meanwhile, “LexisNexis® Legal & Professional today announced the launch of Lexis Analytics, a comprehensive suite of analytics tools that leverages advanced technology, vast stores of legal content and expert curation to give lawyers a decisive competitive advantage in the business and practice of law.” Here’s the press release.

 

  • From LegalWeek, here are Jeffrey Catanzaro’s thoughts about: What junior lawyers need to know about artificial intelligence. “The new lawyers of today are the managing partners and general counsel of tomorrow, and although some commentators may assert that the profession is disruption-free, an increasing body of evidence does suggest the contrary. As the American media mogul Ryan Kavanaugh once said: -The key is to embrace disruption and change early. Don’t react to it decades later. You can’t fight innovation.'”

 

  • Tracy Molino of Dentons has these thoughts about: The practical uses of distributed ledger technology, beyond cryptocurrencies. She breaks down the applications by industry. “Dentons is proud to be the first Canadian law firm to join the Global Legal Blockchain Consortium (GLBC).”

 

  • This piece from The Economist, Law firms climb aboard the AI wagon, doesn’t break any new ground, but provides an overview of law firm applications of AI and the possible ramifications thereof. “Will legal employment eventually shrink? The jury is still out. Some firms expect to employ fewer graduates. But others argue that cheaper services could encourage clients to consult their lawyers more. And although some tasks are automatable, many others rely on human judgment. AI might pinpoint atypical clauses in contracts, for example, but it cannot decide if the anomaly is a deal-breaker. In any event, lawyers should start to find their work more interesting.”

 

  • Here’s a new A2J tool! “An artificial intelligence (AI) platform designed for businesses is to help staff at food banks and MPs’ surgeries refer legal enquiries from members of the public to lawyers….” “What we will be offering is a tool to connect advice givers and lawyers, rather than a replacement for initiatives already taking place.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer, “US law firm Fenwick & West has taken the unusual step of making a public announcement about the positive impact its use of legal AI technology, in this case mainly Kira Systems, is having on the firm, stating that use of automated review technology has cut the time needed for such work ‘by half’.

 

  • Press release: “Seal Software, the leading provider of content discovery and analytics solutions, today announced the acquisition of Apogee Legal, a global leader in advanced contract analytics for the enterprise, in a move that will bolster Seal’s award-winning suite of market leading Intelligent Content Analytics (ICA) AI solutions and its global management team.”

 

  • I’ve posted several times about the burgeoning field of AI-based sentiment analysis and it’s use in applications from police departments to job interviews to advertisers. Now there’s an app for that, so you can try it yourself. “The app uses the latest emotional artificial intelligence (Emotion AI) to read 43 facial muscles 14 times a second, using the front camera of a smartphone. The app gives you seven emotional states – fear, anger, disgust, happiness, contempt, sadness, and surprise. It works while you’re watching a video from a friend, recording your reaction at the same time using the front camera. The recipient and the sender both can see the emotion results in real-time, with the top two emotions given priority. These top two emotions are shows with percentages, indicating which emotion is felt the most by individuals concerned.”

 

  • And finally, here’s a weekend thought piece for you: The New Intelligence: Modern AI and the fundamental undoing of the scientific method. “The days of traditional, human-driven problem solving — developing a hypothesis, uncovering principles, and testing that hypothesis through deduction, logic, and experimentation — may be coming to an end. A confluence of factors (large data sets, step-change infrastructure, algorithms, and computational resources) are moving us toward an entirely new type of discovery, one that sits far beyond the constraints of human-like logic or decision-making: driven solely by AI, rooted in radical empiricism. The implications — from how we celebrate scientific discovery to assigning moral responsibility to those discoveries — are far-reaching.” It’s thought provoking, to say the least.

  • Facial recognition AI has been in the news and on my mind a lot lately. Of course, there are legal implications, but regardless of that aspect, these developments are a big deal of which you should be aware.

– Traveling this 4th of July? Orlando’s airport has rolled out facial recognition for all departing passengers in an attempt to speed up lines (e.g., no need to show your passport at the gate). It takes two seconds and is 99%+ accurate. (Passengers can opt out.) This story from CBS News discusses the privacy implications.

– Could this get a bit out of control? Here’s a case study: “(a)cross China, a network of 176 million surveillance cameras, expected to grow to 626 million by 2020, keeps watch on the country’s over 1.3 billion citizens.” (That’s a camera for every two people.) And, the intent is total surveillance, including inside people’s homes. “According to the official Legal Daily newspaper, the 13th Five Year Plan requires 100 percent surveillance and facial recognition coverage and total unification of its existing databases across the country. By 2020, China will have completed its nationwide facial recognition and surveillance network, achieving near-total surveillance of urban residents, including in their homes via smart TVs and smartphones.” “Soon, police and other officials will be able to monitor people’s activities in their own homes, wherever there is an internet-connected camera.”

Are they effective? Last year, “(i)t took Chinese authorities just seven minutes to locate and apprehend BBC reporter John Sudworth using its powerful network of CCTV camera and facial recognition technology.” That story here. And the case of the stolen potato here.

– “We live in a surveillance society: A U.S. citizen is reportedly captured on CCTV around 75 times per day. And that figure is even higher elsewhere in the world. Your average Brit is likely to be caught on surveillance cameras up to 300 times in the same period.” This post describes how those images can be used to spot (and even predict) crime.

This post (This Japanese AI security camera shows the future of surveillance will be automated) shows AI technology being developed in Japan to spot shoplifters and discusses the concerns about such technologies.

Facebook and others (such as Adobe) are using such recognition technologies to disrupt terrorist networks and mitigate the spread of fake news. “(T)he biggest companies extensively rely on artificial intelligence (AI). Facebook’s uses of AI include image matching. This prevents users from uploading a photo or video that matches another photo or video that has previously been identified as terrorist. Similarly, YouTube reported that 98% of the videos that it removes for violent extremism are also flagged by machine learning algorithms.”

Amazon employees (like Google’s before them) are protesting their company’s selling of such technologies to the government. Amazon workers don’t want their tech used by ICE.

Many (including me) consider this a much more benevolent identity technology: Thousands of Swedes are inserting microchips into themselves – here’s why.

 

 

  • “Mishcon de Reya has joined the ranks of law firms with high-level in-house data science capability, hiring UCL computer scientist Alastair Moore as head of analytics and machine learning.

 

  • From O’MelvenyFTC Seeking Input on Topics to be Explored at Public Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century. Topics include: “(t)he consumer welfare implications associated with the use of algorithmic decision tools, artificial intelligence, and predictive analytics.”

 

  • Here, from Digital Journal, is a discussion of the general ways law firms are using AI: Q&A: How technology is shaking up legal firms.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer, Wolters Kluwer Joins Global Legal Blockchain Consortium. “The GLBC is a global network of key stakeholders in the legal industry, working toward rules for the standardisation, governance, and application of blockchain and related technologies in the global legal system. Its mission is ‘enhance the security, privacy, productivity, and interoperability of the legal technology ecosystem’.”

– More from Artificial Lawyer about Blockchain hereEY + Microsoft Enter the Blockchain IP + Royalties Sector. “Big Four firm EY and Microsoft have launched a blockchain solution for content rights and royalties management, joining a growing group of legal tech start-ups – which are operating at a much smaller scale – that have also developed similar blockchain-based IP solutions.”

 

  • Also from Artificial Lawyer: Global AI Governance Group: ‘AI Decisions Must Track Back to Someone’. “A newly launched AI Global Governance commission (AIGG), tasked with forming links with politicians and governments around the world to help develop and harmonise rules on the use of AI, has suggested that at least one key regulation should be that any decisions made by an AI system ‘must be tracked back to a person or an organisation’.”

This Artificial Lawyer interview with Kira’s Noah Waisberg is more than just an overview of Kira’s rapid growth; it has good insights into doc review generally.

 

  • Here’s a somewhat entertaining look at how law firms are engaging AI vendors. Buying AI for Law Firms: Like a Trip to the Auto Show.

 

  • From Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A. via JDSupraShould Law Firms Embrace Artificial Intelligence and R&D Labs? “Change is difficult, especially in the legal market. Yet a firm’s willingness to think differently reflects its ability to adapt, to ensure sustainability for itself, and to help solve that industrywide puzzle.”

 

  • This article from the NYT (Is There a Smarter Path to Artificial Intelligence? Some Experts Hope So) may sound negative as to Machine Learning being over-hyped, but it positively presents other types of AI. It’s a good read.

 

  • Also somewhat negative is this post from MIT about the AI threat: “AI programs capable of perceiving the real world, interacting with it, and learning about it might eventually become far better at reasoning and even communicating. ‘If you solve manipulation in its fullest,’ Abbeel says, ‘you’ll probably have built something that’s pretty close to full, human-level intelligence’.”
  • Young lawyers are getting good exposure to AI tools and techniques via hackathons as illustrated by this press release from Premonition AI: “The Cognitive Legal Challenge is a critical element of the Global Legal Hackathon, that took place this past weekend Feb. 23 to 25 in 40+ cities in 6 continents with a projected attendance of over 10,000. Via the Cognitive Legal Challenge, lawyers crowd-sourced the creation of new legal AI applications capable of reasoning through use of IBM’s Watson Knowledge Studio and Premonition AI, the world’s largest litigation database.”

 

  • From Smithsonian, this is an interesting discussion of the possibility of bias in AI when predicting crime.

 

 

  • Speaking of contracts, this press release from Thomson Reuters represents quite an endorsement of eBrevia. “Thomson Reuters has teamed up with eBrevia, a leading machine-learning contract analytics platform, to help enterprises tackle large and complex contract remediation projects involving commercial contracts.”

 

  • There has certainly been a lot of discussion lately about the impact of the GDPR on AI, but not much about AI and HIPAA. This is a good discussion of that topic from Davis Wright’s Rebecca L. Williams. (This is part one of two.)

 

  • The World Legal AI Summit in Barcelona this June should be informative — or a boondoggle. Make of it what you will.

 

  • Just for fun, Apple spared no expense producing this new ad (or is it a music video?) promoting the HomePod. (Directed by Spike Jones, starring English performer FKA twigs, music by Anderson .Paak.)