• Legalweek (formerly Legaltech) is just a few days away, so here’sA Beginner’s Guide To The Biggest Week In Legal Technology.

 

  • Data & Analytics: Transforming Law Firms” has just been published by ALM Intelligence and LexisNexis. Here’s an executive summary and link to the report.

 

  • Here’s a fresh essay about law firm innovation from  of Thomson Reuters Legal Managed ServicesGreasing The Gears Of Legal Commerce — Automatic, Systematic, Hydromatic (alt.legal) Innovation. “CLOs indicated that nearly 25 percent of outside counsel fees are “price-insensitive.”

 

  • The Big 4 continue their relentless march into legal. I skip most of these posts, but this one specifically mentions AI: KPMG expands Asia Pacific legal services. “It will also offer technology enabled legal services, using robotics, artificial intelligence and other technologies developed globally and in China through the KPMG digital ignition centre.”

 

  • This is an interesting post by Charles P. Edwards of Barnes & Thornburg: The Noisy Business of the Law and Insurance Claims. “…(T)he idea we humans are needed for most decisions is an ‘illusion.'”

 

  • Here’s a good example of a law firm (Amsterdam’s De Brauw) using tech as a differentiating marketing strategyHop on board and experience the value of legal tech and project management.

 

  • Bob Ambrogi posted this 47-minute podcast: LawNext Episode 25: Using AI to Enhance Virtual Receptionists, with Smith.ai.

 

  • From Arup Das of Alphaserve Technologies, here’s an interesting discussion of the age-old build vs. buy conundrum: How to Approach Legal Innovation: Options for Every Firm.

 

  • This is a thought-provoking post: Can Deepfakes Pose a Cybersecurity Threat to Legal? ““Deepfakes are real and emerging as an issue but they, like certain types of technology, could emerge very quickly; we talk about this today and it could be a very big deal in six months or it could be nothing,” Reed Smith’s Stegmaier cautioned. “We simply don’t know.””

 

  • This hour-long podcast is from the Lawyerist: “In this episode with Natalie Worsfold, we talk about her law firm’s approach to law practice, and why more firms aren’t following suit. We start by asking Natalie what problem Counter Tax was trying to solve, then explore how they solved it, what their solution does now, and the plans they have to evolve and grow their solution.”

 

  • This is an idea I have been kicking around for a while. Nick Hilborne gives it the thought I believe it’s due: “Reproduction of the legal profession” at risk from automation. “If junior associates are ‘gradually culled’ from law firms as a result of automation, the entire reproduction of the legal profession could be jeopardised….'” And here’s a US write up of the same issue: Junior Lawyers Are Going Extinct And Nobody Knows What To Do About It.

 

  • AI Goes to Court: A Conversation With Lex Machina and Dorsey & Whitney. Post here.

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

  • The Benefits of the LexisNexis LegalTech Accelerator. Post here.
  • EY and Artificial Lawyer Hold Legal Ops + Technology Event.  Post here.
  • Slaughter and May Names 3rd Fast Forward Cohort, Inc. Blockchain Co. Post here.
  • Meet ATJ Bot – The World’s First Legal Aid Voice Assistant. Post here.
  • How to Build Your Business Case For Contract Management – The Juro Guide. Post here.
  • Oz + NZ Professional Services Startup of the Year Award Launched. Post here.
  • Legal AI Co. CourtQuant Predicts Hard Brexit Impact on British Law. Post here.
  • Christian Lang + Former TR Boss, Tom Glocer, Join Reynen Court. Post here.
  • GCs Keen To Embrace Tech Tools + Legal Ops Skills – Survey. Post here. (Note: This story is based on a survey where n=80. Assuming no other methodological problems [big assumption!], this means that in all of the findings each number is well within the margin of sampling error of the statistics above and below it on the graphs.)
  • Meet Fincap Law: A New Tech-Driven Firm For the New Legal Era. Post here.

 

Posts by Law Firms:

 

 

 

 

 

  • Eric A. Klein and Aytan Dahukey of Sheppard Mullin posted: Day 2 Notes From The 2019 JPMorgan Healthcare Conference. “We are seeing a lot of healthcare entities starting to focus on precision medicine – artificial intelligence suggesting which oncology drug works best for your specific genetic condition and cancer – but that essentially is a transactional function. And the market really wants a partnering function ” Post here.

 

 

 

  • From Reed SmithDraft ethics guidelines for trustworthy artificial intelligence published by the European Commission. Post here.

 

 

  • Akin Gump postedPolicymakers Focused on Artificial Intelligence, Write Akin Gump Lawyers in The Journal of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence & Law.

 

  • Hogan Lovells postedLitigating intellectual property issues: The impact of AI and machine learning.

 

Press Releases and sponsored posts:

  • Here’s a thorough explanation of Gavelytics: Want Better Litigation Outcomes? Know Your Judges. “…(W)ith Gavelytics, you finally get the quantifiable and reliable judge information you need to customize your litigation strategy and increase your chances of winning.”

 

 

  • Gibson Dunn launches AI and automated systems group. Post here.

 

  • The world’s first virtual lawyer, built for Amazon’s Alexa, tests whether lawyers will be replaced by robots. “Australian legal-technology company Smarter Drafter have announced a prototype virtual lawyer, built on Amazon’s Alexa, that creates legal.” documents instantly, just like a real human lawyer. Here’s the Smart Drafter release. Hype much?? And then there’s this: “No date has been set for the release of the first working Alexa integration.”

 

  • HaystackID Acquires eDiscovery Managed Services Provider eTERA, Release here.

 

  • Legal IT Newswire New Product News… Alphaserve Technologies launch Execution as a Service. Post here.

 

  • I’m including this because I used to work there! Am Law 200 Firm Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie Selects Litera Desktop, Litera Microsystems Full Document Drafting Suite.

 

Blockchain

 

 

 

 

  • From the Baker & Hostetler Energy BlogNew Blockchain Products, an FBI Raid, the $11 Billion Bitcoin Case, Hackers Strike With a 51 Percent Attack and Crypto Tax Analysis. Post here.

 

 

  • Here’s a deep dive into the legal services offered by Oath ProtocolThe Lay of the Land in Blockchain Dispute Resolution and Governance Designs.
  • I can’t wait to see a demo of this. Neota Partners With Legal Consultants for AI-Based Billing Tool. “Neota Logic and legal pricing consultants Burcher Jennings and Validatum teamed up to launch Virtual Pricing Director, a collaboration years in the making.”

 

  • Here’s more news from Neota Logic: Legal tech education: Neota partners with three new universities. “Neota Logic will today (19 October) announce three new education partnerships, with The University of Limerick, Ulster University and London South Bank University, which has launched a new law and technology option for students. Over the course of a semester, students at these schools will learn how to design, build and test digital legal solutions that solve a specific access to justice problem.”

 

  • Slaughter and May expands scope of its technology entrepreneurs programme. “The first two cohorts of the programme, originally named Fintech Fast Forward, focussed on UK-based start-up and high growth companies operating in the fintech sector, including paymentstech, insurtech, regtech, data analytics and AI. Under its new name, Fast Forward, the programme will be expanded to cover young companies operating in a diverse range of emerging technology sectors including IOT, cryptography, cyber, robotics, machine learning and DLT, as well as fintech.” More here.

 

  • Corrs postedAlong for the Ride: Considering the Legal and Practical Consequences of Self-Driving Vehicles. “If you’re over seven years of age – and have completed an online registration process – you can be part of Australia’s first Automated Vehicle Trial, by taking a ride on the Royal Automobile Club of Western Australia (RAC) Intellibus, a fully automated, electric shuttle bus launched on public roads with the support of the WA State Government and the City of South Perth.”

 

  • Gavelytics Partners with CourtCall, Expanding Judicial Analytics to New States, Markets. “Remote court appearance provider CourtCall will offer a ‘simplified version’ of Gavelytics judicial analysis as it expands to Florida, Texas and California.” Details here.

 

  • From LittlerWhat Construction Attorneys Need To Know About AI. (Subscription required.)

 

  • This post isn’t as “legal” as the title might suggest, but it’s an interesting consideration. Artificial intelligence — Who is responsible for the outcomes?

 

  • Thomson Hine postedDepartment of the Treasury Releases Interim Rules Expanding Scope of CFIUS and Creating Pilot Program for Certain Transactions. “While the text of ECRA does not define the term “emerging and foundational technologies,” the following industry sectors could be included: artificial intelligence….”

 

  • Neil Rose postedNew tech demands code of “cyber ethics” for lawyers.

 

  • More from the Mintz seriesStrategies to Unlock AI’s Potential in Health Care, Part 2: FDA’s Approach to Protecting Patients & Promoting Innovation. “Artificial intelligence—AI—is the future of everything. But when patient health is on the line, can we trust algorithms to make decisions instead of patients or their health care providers? This post, the second in our blog series about AI in health care, explores FDA’s proposed regulatory model that is supposed to be better suited for AI (and similar technologies) while still protecting patients.”

 

  • This from HR Daily Advisor: “Like it or not, it’s time to prepare your employees for the fourth industrial revolution, where automated technologies and artificial intelligence are becoming mainstream. Below is more information about what you can do to accomplish this as an L&D professional.”

 

  • From WombleA.I. in the TCPA Crosshairs: TCPA Class Action Challenges Hotel’s Use of IVY Concierge Artificial Intelligence SMS Platform.

 

  • This from the International Association of Privacy Professionals: Perspective: Should robots have rights? “(California) Bill 1001 implicates a hitherto-abstract, philosophical debate about when a simulation of intelligence crosses the line into sentience and becomes a true artificial intelligence.”

 

  • This 5-minute podcast is from Shook Hardy: Can Robots Be Sued? Q&A With Cory Fisher.

 

  • Fully digital conclusion of contracts via Alexa becomes possible for clients of insurtech firm Deutsche Familienversicherung. “Customers can now not only receive advice from Alexa, but can also simultaneously conclude an insurance contract within only a few seconds.” Story here.

 

  • At least in the UK: “There may need to be some coverage disputes before professional indemnity (PI) insurers work out how to deal with bad advice given by artificial intelligence (AI) systems used by lawyers, a leading City firm has warned. It said the widespread use of technology that utilised AI ‘contributes to additional complexity and uncertainty for insureds and insurers when assessing risk and apportioning liability’. More here.

 

  • From Legal Futures: Law firms look to leverage data in battle with new providers. “Law firms big and small are increasingly viewing artificial intelligence (AI) software and particularly the exploitation of data as integral to business health, a survey has found. The annual law firm benchmarking survey by accountancy and consultancy firm Crowe, also found a growing fear of non-lawyer legal services providers, especially among City firms.” I could not find the survey methodology, so let the reader beware.

 

  • “Above the Law and Thomson Reuters present Big Data and the Litigation Analytics Revolution, the fourth and final installment of our Law2020 series, a multimedia exploration of how artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge technologies are reshaping the practice and profession of law.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:
    • “Global legal tech company, Thomson Reuters (TR), has partnered with contracting automation platform Synergist.io, in a move that will see the Germany-based startup integrate with the well-known Contract Express document automation system.” Story here.
    • We Are All Lawyers Now – The Rise of the Legalish. Interesting perspective here.
    • Language and Machine Learning – A Lawyer’s Guide. Post by Johannes Stiehler, CTO, of text analytics company Ayfie
    • More A2J news! California Starts Special Task Force on A2J Tech, Legal AI Founder Joins.

 

Blockchain

  • China’s Internet Censor Releases Draft Regulation for Blockchain Startups. ” The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) published a draft policy on Friday, called “The Regulation for Managing Blockchain Information Services” and is now looking for public feedback before it will take effect.” Story here.

 

 

  • What Carl Sagan has to do with regulating blockchain smart contracts. “If policymakers seem flummoxed by the rise of cryptocurrencies, wait until they get to smart contracts. Just ask Brian Quintenz, commissioner for the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission. At a conference in Dubai this week, Quintenz expressed a sense of awe at the vast unknown that blockchain-based computer programs have created for his agency. “Post here.

 

  • Blockchain developments in Nashville:
    • “Stakeholders in the creation, growth and connectedness of blockchain- or distributed ledger-enabled jobs and wealth creation in Tennessee gathered twice within the past 24 hours with representatives of Tennessee Economic and Community Development (ECD) to explore the technology’s status, the state’s competitive assets and its potential strategic options.” “A nonprofit organization is to be formed to support the collaborative’s aims, according to Waller Lansden attorney Kristen Johns, who is the prime mover in this emerging initiative. Waller cosponsored the event with Brooklyn-based Consensys, a distributed-ledger-oriented tech company.” More here.
    • And check out Tokenize Tennessee here.

 

  • In this post, Jordan Furlong discusses the future of law librarians as impacted by technologies such as AI and as roles evolve into more focus on Competitive Intelligence (here, called Market Intelligence). This article by Jordan is referenced.

 

  • Press releaseGridlogics Launches PatSeer 360™ – IP Strategy Takes a Quantum Leap with Introduction of This Disruptive New IP Intelligence Platform. “PatSeer 360™ correlates patent data with business and legal data points to give you insights for refining your IP protection, management and commercialization strategies. The solution combines Artificial Intelligence, Big Data and immersive visualizations in a versatile and easy to use platform that requires minimum learning curve.”

 

  • From Canadian UnderwriterManaging your client’s M&A risk with A.I. “Lawyers are using machine learning – a type of artificial intelligence in which computer software does something without being explicitly programmed to do so – to identify potential liabilities in contracts. AI lets computer programs learn from experience and identify patterns, Strategy Meets Action notes.”

 

  • From Canadian Lawyer: Critical topics facing the legal community. “The topic of technology continues to dominate the minds of leadership in the legal community. Whether it’s artificial intelligence, whether it’s how you manage the overall data research client information, I think technology is overwhelming for a lot of firms.”

 

  • Richard Burnham, solicitor and co-founder of Eallium CMS, posted: The ethics of lawtech. “For now, lawtech is simply a wide-ranging label that describes technology created with a view to reducing law firm overheads and/or increasing the availability of access to justice. You typically see it deployed within case management systems, document analysis algorithms, case outcome predictors, and chat bots designed to provide interim legal advice to consumers. The ethical conundrums of lawtech are many, sprouting mostly from its complexity.”

 

  • In this podcast, Bob Ambrogi interviews Rick Merrill of Gavelytics to discuss “the product one year after its launch, how lawyers use analytics for strategic and competitive purposes, and how analytics and AI are being used more broadly in law.” LawNext Episode 12: Judging Judges – How Gavelytics’ Judicial Analytics are Reshaping Litigation.

 

  • In Japan, artificial intelligence enters the legal field. “Artificial intelligence has moved into the world of corporate legal matters: A Tokyo-based start-up founded by young lawyers is using AI to check for omissions and mistakes in contracts, sometimes taking only one second.” “LegalForce Inc. was established in April last year, and is led by 31-year-old lawyer Nozomu Tsunoda, who quit a leading law firm to go into business for himself. Even with only seven employees, LegalForce checks contract documents such as a confidentiality agreement between companies.” Coverage here.

 

  • Here’s an interesting article discussing the legal rights of self-aware entities. Apes, dolphins, AI??

 

  • Two posts from Kemp IT Law in as many days! Here‘s a video titled What does the future hold for AI and product liability? “Liability will see extensive AI-influenced legal developments, especially in the areas of autonomous vehicles, robots and other ‘mobile’ autonomous systems.”

 

  • From Osborne ClarkeHave your say | How should competition law apply to the digital economy? “…(O)ther questions look at challenges which are specific to digital markets or new technology, such as: the impact on competition of ownership of big data by a small number of big firms; the impact on competition and cartel enforcement of artificial intelligence and machine learning; and how to deal with mergers and takeovers in digital markets.”

 

  • “Burford Capital Ltd. raised $250 million this week by selling new shares on the London Stock Exchange, the publicly traded litigation finance company announced Tuesday.” “The London-based litigation financier, which had a market cap of $5.4 billion as of Monday, said a debt issue and a private fund raise would follow “shortly.”” Coverage here.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:

– UK Takes Another Step Toward Blockchain Property Register with R3. Story here.

The Launch of the Manchester LegalTech Consortium – (…which Is Now to Be Called the ‘Manchester Law & Technology Initiative’.). Story here.

– Legal AI Platformisation Continues with Diligen/QRX Data Partnership. Story here.

– Legal AI Co. Luminance Goes After The eDiscovery Market. Story here.

– Declare Your Legal Bot! New California Law Demands Bot Transparency. Story here.

 

Blockchain

  • Bullish on Blockchain, Young Phila. Lawyer Launches Boutique. Bull Blockchain Law. “His client base includes various technology industry players with some connection to blockchain technology, he said. They’re using the technology for matters in real estate, data storage, supply chain management, and even gaming. Smart contracts are the most popular business application of blockchain technology, he said. Bull said he’s already in talks with other attorneys about joining the firm, with the goal of ultimately organizing the firm into various departments for different industries.” Industry focus; smart!! Details here.

 

  • This post (Bill Clinton: ‘Permutations and Possibilities of Blockchain are Staggeringly Great’) summarizes an interview with Clinton following his keynote address at Ripple’s annual Swell conference in San Francisco on October 1. “While Clinton acknowledged the potential of disruptive technologies like blockchain, the former president urged that economic and social policy ‘work better as positive sum games.'”

 

  • From DentonsPractical application of distributed ledger technology: Maintaining corporate records on the blockchain. “…(B)usinesses may want to explore implementing DLT (Distributed ledger technology)-based platforms; we believe they can increase efficiency, accuracy, transparency and security in record management and finance while minimizing cost, providing significant competitive advantages to companies that adopt this technology.”

 

  • Shearman & Sterling via LexologyArtificial Intelligence and Algorithms in Cartel Cases: Risks in Potential Broad Theories of Harm.

 

  • Tel Aviv-based LawGeex, which has developed automated contract review technology…,  is announcing that it has closed $12 million in new investment…. It brings the startup’s total funding to date to $21.5 million.

 

  • Here’s an interesting thought piece from Poland’s Adam Polanowski of Wardyński & Partners: “Although the media often announce revolutions prematurely, and autonomous AI is still a long way off, changes in this field are unavoidable. The only question is how fast the legal profession will be automated.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer: “Los Angeles-based, legal AI litigation data analysis company, Gavelytics, has today announced that its proprietary database now extends into San Francisco County Superior Court, which it calls ‘the legal epicenter of one of the most significant business and technology markets in the world’.”

 

  • “Pentagon technology chief Mike Griffin last week announced US military plans to form an office dedicated to procuring and deploying artificial intelligence technology. Meanwhile, the White House still doesn’t have a science adviser.” Details here.
  • From Jones Day: “Protecting Artificial Intelligence and Big Data Innovations Through Patents: Subject Matter Eligibility.” The Alice test is discussed in some detail.

 

  • Legal Talk Network: Sharon Nelson and John Simek (Sensei Enterprises) talk to Bob Ambrogi (Lexblog) and Andrew Arruda (ROSS) about “Creating Your Own Legal Tech Startup” with focus on useful tips.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer: “Legal AI-driven litigation analytics start-up, Gavelytics, has closed a $3.2m funding round from prominent Southern California investors, including the backers of Legal Zoom and Qualcomm.”

 

  • AI Regulation:

From Rep. Robin Kelly, D-Ill, ““The future of U.S. innovation is at stake—this should be a cause of concern for everyone.” “This administration’s science, immigration and education policies are all working together to reduce the U.S. lead in AI technologies.”

From the WSJ: “Artificial Intelligence Rules More of Your Life. Who Rules AI?” This is a pretty thorough discussion of the need for regulation.

From the LA Times: “Artificial intelligence can transform industries, but California lawmakers are worried about your privacy.”

 

  • AI and the environment:

From Science Daily: In a new article published in the journal Conservation Biology, scientists from the University of Helsinki, Digital Geography Lab, argue that methods from artificial intelligence can be used to help monitor the illegal wildlife trade on social media.

From the Environmental Law Institute: “When Software Rules: Rule of Law in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.” Abstract: “This report … provides a brief history of AI and discusses current concerns with AI systems, … an overview of potential environmental applications to AI and discusses different possible forms of semiformal and formal governance, and … provides the private AI sector, programmers, governments, and the public a set of recommendations on how AI governance can include consideration of environmental impacts.”