• Some recent posts report some variation of: “Legal Industry in Last Place in AI, Machine Learning Adoption, According to RELX Survey“. I can’t find the study’s detailed results or methodology, but from what I see best case accuracy is +/-8%, so all 6 industries are probably in a statistical tie. Here’s an example of such reporting. Let the reader beware.

 

  • Yanbin Xu of Finnegan postedStrategies For Blockchain Patent Applications. (I’d say more, but the article is only available in Chinese.)

 

  • Yalonda T. Howze of Mintz posted (in English!): Strategies To Unlock AI’s Potential In Health Care, Part 5: Product Liability Prevention For AI Product Designers—And Their Lawyers. “From my experience in working with outside counsel, in-house counsel, designers and engineers, it has become apparent that safer product design and the minimization of product liability exposure in the AI space requires a collaborative, systematic and iterative protocol. Ultimately, this approach helps to better protect the user, the brand, and the company.”

 

  • Yesterday I had a post from Wales, so today, here’s one from Scotland: In 2050: Education – Equipping Our Learners For The Future, from Neil Maclean of Shepherd and Wedderburn. “As part of Shepherd and Wedderburn’s 250th anniversary, we commissioned the Fraser of Allander Institute to undertake a research project to identify how Scotland might best position itself for the future. The initial scene-setter report can be found here.”

 

  • This is a very deep dive by Fichte & Co.: Demystifying the Financial Regulatory Landscape in the UAE. “The areas that Fintech Hive encourages include big data analytics & protective modeling, robo advisors, biometric & digital identification, the blockchain, P2P & crowdfunding, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence & machine learning, InsurTech, Islamic fintech and RegTech.”

 

  • Meanwhile in India: Redesign ICAI (Institute of Chartered Accountants of India) For The Contemporary World. “PwC and Deloitte are respectively the sixth and seventh largest legal services providers in the world. Accounting firms have an edge in using artificial intelligence and machine learning. The committee’s proposal to allow MDPs will enable audit firms to provide integrated services. Safeguards are necessary to maintain independence.”

 

  • Marine Giral and Herbert Smith’s Shaun McVicar penned: The blockchain revolution and what it means for pharma. “With the development of data driven artificial intelligence, increasingly complex decision could be automated, and implemented without delay. Blockchain transactions are immutable, which makes it virtually impossible to alter or selectively report clinical trial results and could ensure greater transparency and trust in reported outcomes.” There’s quite a lot about blockchain in the article.

 

  • Orrick’s Daniel Nathan and Jorge Pesok postedA Foreboding View of Smart Contract Developer Liability. “On October 16, 2018, Commissioner Brian Quintenz of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission explained his belief that smart contract developers can be held liable for aiding and abetting CFTC rule violations if it was reasonably foreseeable that U.S. persons could use the smart contract they created to violate CFTC rules.” ” In his speech, Commissioner Quintenz provided valuable insight into how one regulator is thinking about applying existing laws to this new market.”

 

  • From the ‘Who’d a Thunk It’ department, Bob Ambrogi went to Moscow and discovered legal tech startups! Dispatch From Russia: Legal Tech Startups Emerge, But Adoption Lags. “Cyrillic doesn’t do AI any favors.” That’s just one footnote to Bob’s very interesting story here.

 

  • For this small, informal survey from the UK, “Jomati interviewed 29 innovation heads from 24 practices and ‘explored the innovation and legal tech strategies of dozens more law firms’.” “While some pioneering law firms had decided firmly, for instance, on adopting artificial intelligence (AI) technology, others were waiting until its cost advantages over outsourcing were more certain before taking the plunge.”

 

  • The Baker McKenzie report Ghosts in the Machine: Revisited I reported last week is getting quite a few mentions in legal and financial publications. Here’s an example. And here.

 

 

  • A couple of months ago, Artificial Lawyer covered the blockchain-based contract software by Chainlink. Now even the MIT Technology Review is taking notice: Blockchain smart contracts are finally good for something in the real world. “A startup says it has tackled a long-standing problem that has kept smart contracts from responding to actual events.” “Using cryptography, the Chainlink service provides proof on the blockchain that the data is in fact the information it committed to delivering. Customers can pay for different levels of decentralization, and the nodes can make money in return for submitting data. Nazarov says the combination of Chainlink’s software with the Town Crier hardware system is the first ‘provably secure, decentralized oracle network.'” Story here.

 

  • This is pretty cool: “The Open Data Institute (ODI), co-founded by the inventor of the web Sir Tim Berners-Lee, is to launch two of the first ever government-backed Data Trusts in the world, with the purpose of training AI systems underpinned by a specific legal structure.” “Data Trusts, which are legally constructed entities, are seen as the answer and help form a regulated bridge between the collected data and the AI companies (or other tech companies such as smart contract developers), while retaining public trust.” More from Artificial Lawyer here.

 

  • Also from the UK  via Computer WeeklyPutting the UK at the forefront of ethics and innovation in AI and data. “Stellar British firms are using artificial intelligence (AI) to help defend against cyber attacks and law firms are adopting the technology to help lawyers do legal searches and draft documentation. But we know the huge rise in the use of data-driven technology must be backed up by a strong ethical framework so it delivers the best for people.” This piece is by Jeremy Wright, Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (aka, “Culture Secretary”).

 

  • Several firms have posted in the past couple of weeks about moves by various US Government agencies and departments to regulate or at least study AI and related topics. Here’s a sampling:

From GoodwinU.S. Government to Define ‘Emerging Technologies’, impacting CFIUS and Export Controls.

From Sheppard MullinThe Little Regulation That Will Make a Big Change in How You Do Business: Department of Commerce to Establish New Export Controls on Emerging Technologies.

–  From DechertNew Government Regulation of Emerging Technology.

From SkaddenUS Department of Commerce Solicits Comments Regarding Emerging Technologies That Are Essential to US National Security.

From LathamDeep Dive on Deep Learning: FTC Considers Artificial Intelligence.

From DLA PiperA New Chapter in Stress Testing. “While noting that emerging artificial intelligence technologies offer many actual and potential beneficial applications for banking, Fed Board Governor Lael Brainard said that financial services ‘firms should be continually vigilant for new issues in the rapidly evolving area of AI.'”

From Davis PolkNewsflash: FTC Hearings 5, 6 and 7 on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century.

From Holland & KnightFTC Kicks Off New Consumer Protection Hearings: Focuses On The Use Of Big Data And Artificial Intelligence.

– From Squire Patton BoggsDigital Health Update: Recent FDA Cyber Initiatives.

From CadwaladerFDIC Chair McWilliams Urges More Collaboration On FinTech.

 

  • I love this “back of the envelope” answer to “Is it AI?” from Karen Hao and the MIT Technology Review.

 

 

  • This half-hour podcast from MeDermott’s Week in Health Law series addresses AI & the Practice of Medicine. Five guests participate (Terry Dee, Jiayan Chen, Kate McDonald, Dale Van Demark, Eric Fish). Topics include where AI in medicine is headed, the need for regulation, privacy, liability, insurance and more. Sorry about the audio quality.

 

  • From Buckley Sandler, here’s a brief summary of Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard’s remarks at the 11/13 “Fintech and New Financial Landscape” conference. “Brainard’s prepared remarks emphasize the benefits and potential risks to bank safety and consumer protection that new AI applications pose.”

 

  • AI probe hears calls for ethics code. “Calls for a code of ethics, concerns about ‘Minority Report’-style crime prediction systems and a proposal for a new legal framework governing data ownership were among the evidence presented to the second public meeting of a landmark probe into the use of algorithms in the justice system. Appearing before the Technology and Law Policy Commission last week, The Hon. Mr. Justice Knowles called for the development of an ethical and legal framework for artificial intelligence. ‘AI is going to go deeper into people’s lives than many things have before,’ he told the commission chaired by Law Society president Christina Blacklaws. ‘It is imperative that we take the opportunity for law and ethics to travel with it.’” Here’s the brief summary from The Law Society Gazette.

 

  • Also from The Law Society GazetteEmbrace technology before your business model is threatened, Welsh firms told. This article summarizes “a seminar held by the National Assembly for Wales on the challenges presented by artificial intelligence and automation to legal services….”

 

  • Greenberg Traurig’s Paul Ferrillo posted this along with SDI Cyber’s George PlatsisQuantum Computing to Protect Data: Will You Wait and See or Be an Early Adopter? “So while we are still very much in the “zone of the unknown” a word of advice: if you’re a data-heavy organization and you plan to use and keep that data for years to come, you need to start thinking about new and alternate forms of encryption today.”

 

  • Here’s another thought piece from Mark A. CohenWhat Are Law Schools Training Students For? “Law is entering the age of the consumer and bidding adieu to the guild that enshrined lawyers and the myth of legal exceptionalism. That’s good news for prospective and existing legal consumers.” He addresses the challenges this will present for law schools. “These changes are affecting what it means to ‘think like a lawyer’ and, more importantly, what skills “legal” skills are required in today’s marketplace.”

 

 

  • From MobiHealthNews: Roundup: 12 healthcare algorithms cleared by the FDA. “As AI cements its role in healthcare, more and more intelligent software offerings are pursuing 510(k) and De Novo approvals.” Each of the 12 are summarized here.

 

  • Here (Geek comes of age), Joanna Goodman provides a good summary of this year’s Legal Geek event and the look into the future presented.

 

  • This story appeared in the New Hampshire Union LeaderIs Alexa’s speech protected? “The proper police procedures for searching a home or briefcase have been hammered out through decades of case law. But the question of how easy it should be for police to access the vast troves of data collected by the so-called internet of things — devices like Amazon’s Echo, Google’s Home, smart toasters, and other household objects equipped with sensors and connected to networks — is far from settled law.” Several credible sources are cited for opinion.

 

  • Ashley Deeks of the University of Virginia Law School penned: Artificial Intelligence and the Resort to Force. “How will AI change the way states make decisions about when to resort to force under international law? Will the use of AI improve or worsen those decisions? What should states take into account when determining how to use AI to conduct their jus ad bellum analyses?” This post is an overview of a larger article by Deeks and two colleagues.

 

  • Eamonn Moran of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton wrote: A Regulator’s Assessment of the Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Financial Services. The Federal Reserve Board’s “Fintech working group is working across the Federal Reserve System ‘to take a deliberate approach to understanding the potential implications of AI for financial services, particularly as they relate to our responsibilities.'” Here’s the full post.

 

  • Former Lehman lawyer predicts big role for AI post-Brexit. “A former senior counsel for Lehman Brothers investment bank and artificial intelligence (AI) technology pioneer has predicted AI will be crucial in helping companies alter thousands of contracts rapidly in the aftermath of Brexit. Beth Anisman, former global chief administrative officer in Lehman’s legal compliance and audit department, who subsequently co-founded an AI company, Apogee Legal – recently sold to e-discovery giant Seal Software – said disentangling contracts following Lehman’s collapse 10 years ago would have benefited from AI.” More here.

 

Blockchain

  • From BlockTribuneBlockchain, AI and the Legal System – Will Tech Lead The Law? “What happens when technologies, such as deep learning software and self-enforcement code, lead legal decisions? How can one ensure that next-generation legal technology systems are not unfairly biased against certain groups or individuals? And what skills will lawyers need to develop in order to properly assess the quality of justice that flows from data-driven decisions?” “Mireille Hildebrandt, professor at the law, science, technology and society research group at Vrije Universiteit Brussels in Belgium, will formulate and respond to during a five-year project to investigate the implications of what she calls ‘computational law’.” More here.

 

  • K&L Gates has posted Volume 38 of it’s Blockchain Energizer Energy Alert, this time summarizing three recent developments.

 

  • West Virginia Secretary of State Reports Successful Blockchain Voting in 2018 Midterm Elections. “…(I)n the 2018 midterm elections, 144 military personnel stationed overseas from 24 counties were able to cast their ballots on a mobile, blockchain-based platform called Voatz….” More here.

The biggest story in AI this week is the launch in China of an AI (“Digital Human”) news reader/anchor person. It’s certainly not Uncle Walter, but at first glance it’s pretty convincing. “The Chinese AI anchor man looks very much like the average Chinese citizen, a typical Chinese guy with that oddly intellectual look. He looks reassuring, made for his market like most news readers’ images are supposed to be.” Coverage here, here, here and video here. “There’s fake news, and then there’s fake people doing the news.”

In related news, Microsoft has developed AI that goes beyond the now well-established systems that write news articles. “Condensing paragraphs into sentences isn’t easy for artificial intelligence (AI). That’s because it requires a semantic understanding of the text that’s beyond the capabilities of most off-the-shelf natural language processing models. But it’s not impossible, as researchers at Microsoft recently demonstrated.”

 

  • Read this post from Artificial Lawyer. It provides some excellent insights from the heads of legal departments in some major corporations as to where the industry is headed and why. Legal Is Not ‘Special’ – Key Message of TR Legal Tech Procurement Event.

 

  • Artificial Lawyer (AL) has begun to do product reviews. The first company to be reviewed is Kira Systems, and here is the link. It’s not actually a link to a review, but rather a call for users to review the product according to specified criteria which will then be reported. Cool.

 

More posts from Artificial Lawyer:

– BCLP Launches ML Early Dispute Evaluation Service. “Clear/Cut harnesses the firm’s award-winning in-house forensic technology capability.” More here.

– Big Data Startup Concirrus Wins Norton Rose InsurTech Prize. Details here.

– Using AI Contract Analysis to Prepare for Brexit – Seal Software. More of this sponsored post here.

 

  • Blank Rome publishedWill “Leaky” Machine Learning Usher in a New Wave of Lawsuits? in RAIL: The Journal of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence & Law. “…(I)t seems all but inevitable that some of those (AI) systems will create unintended and unforeseen consequences, including harm to individuals and society at large.”

 

  • Law.com posted this news from Byran Cave: New Data Analysis Service Could Help In-House Clients See the Future. “…Clear/Cut leverages predictive coding and machine learning to comb through massive amounts of data and pluck out key information for legal analysts, who use the data to recommend whether clients should settle or forge ahead with litigation.” More here.

 

 

  • From Laura H. Phillips of DrinkerThe FCC Wades into the Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning Pool. ” Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai issued a Public Notice announcing a first ever FCC Forum focusing on artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. This Forum will convene at FCC headquarters on November 30.”

 

  • This, from Jonathan BockmanRudy Y. Kim, and Anna Yuan of MoFo: Patenting Artificial Intelligence in the U.S. – Considerations for AI Companies. “…(C)ertain AI technologies can face increased scrutiny at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) with respect to whether the invention is directed to patent-eligible subject matter.”

 

  • James M. Beck of ReedSmith publishedThe Diagnostic Artificial Intelligence Speedbump Nobody’s Mentioning. This is a very interesting and thorough treatment of the FDA’s regulations and the need for more.

 

  • Canada’s Torys published: Software As Medical Devices And Digital Health In Canada: What’s Next? Link here.

 

  • From Pillsbury’s Ashley E. CowgillArtificial Intelligence: A Grayish Area for Insurance Coverage. Download here from The Journal of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence & Law Vol. 2, No. 1.

 

  • Here’s an interesting post by Ian Connett of QuantumJuristA Future of J.D. Advantage Jobs? (“J.D. Advantage” jobs are those for which a law degree is strongly preferred, but not necessarily required.) As you might expect, the answer is “yes”, and the specific examples he presents are interesting.

 

  • “Amazon Web Services (AWS), Amazon’s on-demand cloud computing subsidiary, was partially HIPAA eligible — AWS customers could use Polly, SageMaker, Rekognition, and dozens of the platform’s other offerings to process health information. But Translate, Comprehend, and Transcribe remained notable holdouts — until now, that is. As of this week, all three comply with HIPAA.” Story from Venture Beat here.

 

  • Dentons has published this Market Insights volume titled: Digital Transformation and the Digital Consumer. There’s a chapter on AI and much of the content is AI-related. There’s a video excerpt here.

 

  • LeClairRyan has published Airplanes and Artificial Intelligence Parts I and II. “…(A)pplications for AI in aviation and its effect on the legal liability and regulation of those who use it.”

 

  • From Hogan Lovells, here’s a link to download Artificial Intelligence and your business: A guide for navigating the legal, policy, commercial, and strategic challenges ahead.

 

  • Milena Higgins of Black Hills is the guest on this episode of Legal Talk Network’s “Legal Toolkit”: Robot Takeover: How Automation Makes Law Practice Easier.

 

  • Here’s Part 4 of Mintz’ Strategies To Unlock AI’s Potential In Health Care, Part 4: How And When Will Congress Act?

 

  • At two events in the past 30 days I’ve been part of discussions about law firms acquiring tech companies. Here’s an example: Singapore law firm Rajah & Tann acquires e-discovery startup LegalComet.

 

  • “Nalytics, is working with Strathclyde University’s Law School post-graduate students on a new project dedicated to promoting digital transformation in legal education. By providing free access to the Nalytics search and discovery platform to students on the Diploma in Professional Legal Studies, the project aims to help students develop a greater understanding of legal technology and more importantly, its applications in tackling a range of big data problems.” Story here.

 

  • This article from S&P Global Platts (Commodity market AI applications are emerging along with new risks) cites partners at several prominent law firms among others. “Artificial intelligence and smart contract technology like blockchain are slowly being adopted by commodity markets, creating opportunities to streamline trading and other functions, but not without introducing challenges and risks experts said Thursday.”

 

  • Exterro has issued the results of another survey. (2018 In-house Legal Benchmarking Report. There’s a link here.) All that is presented regarding the methodology is “…with over 100 respondents (more than ever before), this year’s report surveys a wider distribution of companies, including more from organizations of fewer than 25,000 people than in the past.” So, I’m assuming there are 101 respondents, making the typical margin of error error about +/-10%. Given the wide range of company sizes (1 to 250,000+ employees) and the fact most fall into one size category (1,000-25,000 employees), I don’t see how there can be much useful information anywhere in the report. Law.com talks about it (without regard to the methodology) here.

 

  • Here’s another industry survey. (The Blickstein Group’s 10th Annual Law Department Operations Survey.) This one has 128 respondents this year, but reports data back to 2008 when they had only 34 respondents. This year’s stats are probably accurate +/-9% which means that many of the differences reported are actually in a statistical tie, and the prior year data with very small samples should be ignored. Above the Law includes a summary by Brad Blickstein here without comment on its methodology. When combined with the included content by vendors and law firms, I see this study as the equivalent of an interesting focus group — just don’t take the statistics seriously.

 

  • I find it interesting that this post from Kyocera BRANDVOICE in Forbes (Can The Right Office Equipment Improve Our Legal Culture?) has a section on AI. They include AI as “equipment-related”.

 

  • Here, from the New York Times DealBook is a thorough examination of the bias present in today’s artificial intelligence:  AI: The Commonality of A.I. and Diversity. (It’s written by Alina Tugend)

 

Blockchain

  • This, from ContractWorks: Are Your Contracts in Chaos? Get Organized with These 4 Tips.

 

 

Also from Artificial Lawyer:

Smart Contract Pioneer OpenLaw Goes Open Source. Story here.

  • I can’t wait to see a demo of this. Neota Partners With Legal Consultants for AI-Based Billing Tool. “Neota Logic and legal pricing consultants Burcher Jennings and Validatum teamed up to launch Virtual Pricing Director, a collaboration years in the making.”

 

  • Here’s more news from Neota Logic: Legal tech education: Neota partners with three new universities. “Neota Logic will today (19 October) announce three new education partnerships, with The University of Limerick, Ulster University and London South Bank University, which has launched a new law and technology option for students. Over the course of a semester, students at these schools will learn how to design, build and test digital legal solutions that solve a specific access to justice problem.”

 

  • Slaughter and May expands scope of its technology entrepreneurs programme. “The first two cohorts of the programme, originally named Fintech Fast Forward, focussed on UK-based start-up and high growth companies operating in the fintech sector, including paymentstech, insurtech, regtech, data analytics and AI. Under its new name, Fast Forward, the programme will be expanded to cover young companies operating in a diverse range of emerging technology sectors including IOT, cryptography, cyber, robotics, machine learning and DLT, as well as fintech.” More here.

 

  • Corrs postedAlong for the Ride: Considering the Legal and Practical Consequences of Self-Driving Vehicles. “If you’re over seven years of age – and have completed an online registration process – you can be part of Australia’s first Automated Vehicle Trial, by taking a ride on the Royal Automobile Club of Western Australia (RAC) Intellibus, a fully automated, electric shuttle bus launched on public roads with the support of the WA State Government and the City of South Perth.”

 

  • Gavelytics Partners with CourtCall, Expanding Judicial Analytics to New States, Markets. “Remote court appearance provider CourtCall will offer a ‘simplified version’ of Gavelytics judicial analysis as it expands to Florida, Texas and California.” Details here.

 

  • From LittlerWhat Construction Attorneys Need To Know About AI. (Subscription required.)

 

  • This post isn’t as “legal” as the title might suggest, but it’s an interesting consideration. Artificial intelligence — Who is responsible for the outcomes?

 

  • Thomson Hine postedDepartment of the Treasury Releases Interim Rules Expanding Scope of CFIUS and Creating Pilot Program for Certain Transactions. “While the text of ECRA does not define the term “emerging and foundational technologies,” the following industry sectors could be included: artificial intelligence….”

 

  • Neil Rose postedNew tech demands code of “cyber ethics” for lawyers.

 

  • More from the Mintz seriesStrategies to Unlock AI’s Potential in Health Care, Part 2: FDA’s Approach to Protecting Patients & Promoting Innovation. “Artificial intelligence—AI—is the future of everything. But when patient health is on the line, can we trust algorithms to make decisions instead of patients or their health care providers? This post, the second in our blog series about AI in health care, explores FDA’s proposed regulatory model that is supposed to be better suited for AI (and similar technologies) while still protecting patients.”

 

  • This from HR Daily Advisor: “Like it or not, it’s time to prepare your employees for the fourth industrial revolution, where automated technologies and artificial intelligence are becoming mainstream. Below is more information about what you can do to accomplish this as an L&D professional.”

 

  • From WombleA.I. in the TCPA Crosshairs: TCPA Class Action Challenges Hotel’s Use of IVY Concierge Artificial Intelligence SMS Platform.

 

  • This from the International Association of Privacy Professionals: Perspective: Should robots have rights? “(California) Bill 1001 implicates a hitherto-abstract, philosophical debate about when a simulation of intelligence crosses the line into sentience and becomes a true artificial intelligence.”

 

  • This 5-minute podcast is from Shook Hardy: Can Robots Be Sued? Q&A With Cory Fisher.

 

  • Fully digital conclusion of contracts via Alexa becomes possible for clients of insurtech firm Deutsche Familienversicherung. “Customers can now not only receive advice from Alexa, but can also simultaneously conclude an insurance contract within only a few seconds.” Story here.

 

  • At least in the UK: “There may need to be some coverage disputes before professional indemnity (PI) insurers work out how to deal with bad advice given by artificial intelligence (AI) systems used by lawyers, a leading City firm has warned. It said the widespread use of technology that utilised AI ‘contributes to additional complexity and uncertainty for insureds and insurers when assessing risk and apportioning liability’. More here.

 

  • From Legal Futures: Law firms look to leverage data in battle with new providers. “Law firms big and small are increasingly viewing artificial intelligence (AI) software and particularly the exploitation of data as integral to business health, a survey has found. The annual law firm benchmarking survey by accountancy and consultancy firm Crowe, also found a growing fear of non-lawyer legal services providers, especially among City firms.” I could not find the survey methodology, so let the reader beware.

 

  • “Above the Law and Thomson Reuters present Big Data and the Litigation Analytics Revolution, the fourth and final installment of our Law2020 series, a multimedia exploration of how artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge technologies are reshaping the practice and profession of law.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:
    • “Global legal tech company, Thomson Reuters (TR), has partnered with contracting automation platform Synergist.io, in a move that will see the Germany-based startup integrate with the well-known Contract Express document automation system.” Story here.
    • We Are All Lawyers Now – The Rise of the Legalish. Interesting perspective here.
    • Language and Machine Learning – A Lawyer’s Guide. Post by Johannes Stiehler, CTO, of text analytics company Ayfie
    • More A2J news! California Starts Special Task Force on A2J Tech, Legal AI Founder Joins.

 

Blockchain

  • China’s Internet Censor Releases Draft Regulation for Blockchain Startups. ” The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) published a draft policy on Friday, called “The Regulation for Managing Blockchain Information Services” and is now looking for public feedback before it will take effect.” Story here.

 

 

  • What Carl Sagan has to do with regulating blockchain smart contracts. “If policymakers seem flummoxed by the rise of cryptocurrencies, wait until they get to smart contracts. Just ask Brian Quintenz, commissioner for the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission. At a conference in Dubai this week, Quintenz expressed a sense of awe at the vast unknown that blockchain-based computer programs have created for his agency. “Post here.

 

  • Blockchain developments in Nashville:
    • “Stakeholders in the creation, growth and connectedness of blockchain- or distributed ledger-enabled jobs and wealth creation in Tennessee gathered twice within the past 24 hours with representatives of Tennessee Economic and Community Development (ECD) to explore the technology’s status, the state’s competitive assets and its potential strategic options.” “A nonprofit organization is to be formed to support the collaborative’s aims, according to Waller Lansden attorney Kristen Johns, who is the prime mover in this emerging initiative. Waller cosponsored the event with Brooklyn-based Consensys, a distributed-ledger-oriented tech company.” More here.
    • And check out Tokenize Tennessee here.

 

  • This story has received VERY wide coverage, with headlines including:

Stephen Schwarzman Makes Anchor Gift For New $1 Billion School Of Artificial Intelligence At MIT;

MIT announces $1b outlay for study of artificial intelligence, computing; 

M.I.T. Plans College for Artificial Intelligence, Backed by $1 Billion;

MIT commits $1 billion to make AI part of every graduate’s education;

M.I.T. wants to build an AI-focused college using a ‘planned investment’ of $1 billion.

From Simpson Thatcher: “The Firm represented Blackstone Chairman and CEO Stephen A. Schwarzman’s foundation in connection with the foundation’s $350 million gift to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The gift is a portion of a $1 billion investment to establish a college for computing and artificial intelligence. The college, called the M.I.T. Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, will address the global opportunities and challenges presented by the prevalence of computing and the rise of artificial intelligence.”

Coverage herehereherehere and here.

 

  • William Hays Weissman of Littler postedWhy Robot Taxes Won’t Work. Several arguments to support the thesis are presented, including: “… from a tax administration perspective, robots pay no income tax because they do not earn income, pay no sales tax because they do not purchase items, and pay no property tax because they do not own anything”

 

  • Knobbe Martens publishedFDA Expresses Priorities for Clinical Trial Efficiency, Artificial Intelligence. “According to (FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.), clinical trials “are becoming more costly and complex to administer” while “new technologies and sources of data and analysis make better approaches possible.” In order to take advantage of these better approaches, Gottlieb pointed to the FDA’s Breakthrough Devices Draft Guidance, which proposes streamlined procedures to develop flexible clinical trial designs for important medical devices. This will allow the FDA to “evaluate . . . innovative devices more efficiently.” Six breakthrough devices have already been cleared using this program.”

 

  • From GoodwinTreasury Department Imposes Mandatory Filing Requirement on Parties to Certain Foreign Investments in U.S. Critical Technology Companies. “‘Emerging and foundational technologies’ soon to be controlled pursuant to a separate, interagency process underway and expected to target technologies not currently subject to ITAR or EAR controls, possibly including technologies relating to artificial intelligence, robotics, cybersecurity, advanced materials, telecommunications, and biomedicine, among others.”

 

  • From Osborne ClarkeShaping future competition law enforcement in digital markets | Furman review calls for evidence. “The first set of questions in the call for evidence asks about the substantive analysis of competition in digital markets and considers: … artificial intelligence tools and their impact on competition, including whether algorithmic pricing raises new competition concerns.”

 

  • Can artificial intelligence change construction? “As IBM’s Watson adds its computational power to construction sites, tech sees an industry in need of an upgrade.” “On especially complicated projects, Fluor (a global engineering and construction company) will begin using two new tools, the EPC Project Health Diagnostics and the Market Dynamics/Spend Analytics, to make sense of the thousands of data points found on a crowded construction site. Constant analysis will help forecast issues before they show up, and automate how materials and workers are distributed.” “Fortune found many tech firms investing billions in construction tech firms, including Oracle, which purchased Aconex for $1.2 billion in February, and Trimble, which bought Viewpoint for $1.2 billion in April.” Much more here.

 

  • Mintz publishedStrategies to Unlock AI’s Potential in Health Care, a Mintz Series. “The Journal of the American Medical Association in its September 18, 2018 issue included four articles on deep learning and Artificial Intelligence (AI). In one of several viewpoint pieces, On the Prospects for a (Deep) Learning Health Care System, the author’s conclusions aptly describe why health care providers, entrepreneurs, investors and even regulators are so enthusiastic about the use of AI in health care: Pressures to deploy deep learning and a range of tools derived from modern data science will be relentless, given the extraordinarily rich information now available to characterize and follow vast numbers of patients, the ongoing challenges of making sense of the complexity of human biology and health care systems, and the potential for smart information technology to support tomorrow’s clinicians in the provision of safe, effective, efficient, and humanistic care.”

 

  •  of Hunton postedLawyering Cashierless Technologies. “There is no doubt that there’s a revolution coming to the way consumers buy goods at brick and mortar stores as retailers seek to better meet customers’ need for speed and create novel shopping experiences. However, with this revolution comes new risks. There are a wide range of potential issues that retailers should consider before launching cashierless technology….”

 

  • Press releaseFirst-Ever Virtual Law Firm Puts Clients First. “By using Artificial Intelligence and robots, they’re (“2nd.law”) able to provide legal services for their clients at a steeply discounted price — up to 75% lower than the rates and fees that traditional firms offer — all while putting client relationships first.”

 

  • Lloyd Langenhoven of Herbert Smith Freehills posted this thoughtful piece: The symbiotic relationship between lawyer and legal tech. “Continued and efficient success for the legal profession, on both a macro and micro scale, lies in the ability of the profession to foster a symbiotic relationship between legal technology, client’s expectations and traditional legal knowledge. The future looks bright and exciting for the legal profession and it is about time our professional dusted the cobwebs off and donned a new, futuristic suit.”

 

  • This article from The Law Society Gazette frequently cites Brown Rudnick’s Nicholas Tse: IBA Rome: Artificial intelligence must mean strict liability – and higher insurance premiums. “‘The law needs to try not to multiply problems of dealing with AI and should not invest AI with legal personality,’ he told a session moderated by Law Society president Christina Blacklaws. ‘The work of the law is to try and be pragmatic, ensuring accountability while not stifling progress.’”

 

  • This from an associate at a major City law firm: “For at least a year I have been reading in the legal press how wonderful corporate law firms are with technology and how their pioneering work with artificial intelligence is unleashing a ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’/’profound paradigm shift’/’New Law 2.0 era’/insert buzz-term of choice that will fundamentally change the profession. But when I look around all I can see is some new laptops and phones given to us by our supposedly tech-savvy firms. This despite my own employer aggressively marketing itself as some kind of futuristic Silicon Valley-style start-up.”

 

  • From Lawyerist.comHow an Online Game Can Help AI Address Access to Justice (A2J). “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that the majority of those in possession of legal problems, remain in want of solutions.1 Also, ROBOTS!  Ergo, we should throw AI at A2J. There is considerably less consensus, however, on how (or why exactly) this should be done. But don’t worry! There’s an app/game for that, and it let’s you train artificial intelligence to help address access-to-justice issues.”

 

  • Holly Urban, CEO at EffortlessLegal posted: Artificial Intelligence: A Litigator’s New Best Friend? “This article is intended to help litigation attorneys looking to utilize AI to maximize their outcomes with minimal additional effort or expense.” In conclusion, like several before her, she reminds us: “As the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct states, ‘To maintain the requisite knowledge and skill, a lawyer should keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice, including the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology, engage in continuing study and education and comply with all continuing legal education requirements to which the lawyer is subject.'”

 

  • This story has been widely reported: Stephen Hawking feared race of ‘superhumans’ able to manipulate their own DNA. “Before he died in March, the Cambridge University professor predicted that people this century would gain the capacity to edit human traits such as intelligence and aggression. And he worried that the capacity for genetic engineering would be concentrated in the hands of the wealthy. Hawking mulled this future in a set of essays and articles being published posthumously Tuesday as ‘Brief Answers to the Big Questions….‘” “Once such superhumans appear, there are going to be significant political problems with the unimproved humans, who won’t be able to compete.” More coverage here and here.

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

 

  • Suffolk Law School Uses Reddit to Create Legal Question A2J Taxonomy. “A collaboration of Suffolk Law School’s Legal Innovation and Technology Lab in the US and Stanford Law School’s Legal Design Lab with funding from The Pew Charitable Trusts is taking legal questions from consumers posted on social media site Reddit, and using them to create a taxonomy of legal issues to help train A2J tech applications. Sounds unusual? At first it does, but when you look deeper it all makes sense. David Colarusso,  Director of Suffolk University Law School’s Legal Innovation and Technology Lab, explained to Artificial Lawyer what this is all about.” Here‘s the post.

 

  • I particularly enjoyed this opinion piece by the founder of Artificial Lawyer, Richard Tromans: The Politics of Legal Tech – Progressives vs Conservatives. “There are clearly then a wide range of views and goals when it comes to legal tech. We are not all on the same page. There are divisions. There are competing narratives. There is a battle of ideas to see which ones win out and different people, firms and organisations are arguing for different points of view. The legal tech world is, in a word, political.”

 

Blockchain

  • The state of blockchain: 11 stats. “How many CIOs are actively adopting or experimenting with blockchain? Dig into telling data from multiple sources.” Here’s the story from The Enterprisers Project.

  • This from Artificial Lawyer: Integra Ledger Launches Tools to Add Blockchain Tech to All Legal Software.
  • American Lawyer discusses Altman Weil’s latest Law Firms in Transition Survey here. With findings like this:

“…law firm leaders are increasingly fed up with their partners’ resistance to change. Meanwhile, half of firm leaders said there’s nothing especially different about their firms compared to their competitors,”

it’s a good dose of reality. I also love this quote from the always astute Tom Clay: “(t)he whole profession is changing rapidly, and to just drift along, make incremental changes and not have a dedication to innovation in some way seems idiotic to me.” Here’s the link to the whole study.

(In my experience, Altman Weil has always been careful about methodologically sound research. This survey has 801 law firm leaders responding for an overall maximum margin of sampling error of +/-3.5% at the 95% confidence level. You won’t find many surveys in our industry with less potential for non-response bias; they managed an excellent overall 50% response rate. Nice. With few exceptions, they do not break the data down into segments too small for meaningful statistical analysis, and their longitudinal trends are all based on solid samples. I am annoyed that they report findings with unjustified decimal point precision (e.g., 27.3%), especially when they get into very small segments such as 1000+ lawyer firms. The verbatim comments add nice color to the statistical findings.)

 

  • While speaking on Silvia Hodges Silverstein’s “Buying Legal Council” webinar this morning, I believe I said “better, faster, cheaper” four or five times. This post (How AI Is Making Prediction Cheaper) on HBR‘s IdeaCast by Avi Goldfarb, a professor at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, does a good job of explaining how machine learning accomplishes those goals.

 

  • Because of its Big Data underpinnings, AI faces all kinds of issues with the GDPR. This post discusses the implications for the insurance industry’s uses of AI. It’s mainly bad news, but some is positive. “Regulators are beginning to teach robots who’s the boss.” More insights from Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr regarding InsurTech Fundamentals and Compliance Strategies for Implementation here.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer: “LinkSquares, the Boston, US-based legal AI contract analytics platform for inhouse lawyers, has just raised $2.16 million in a seed funding round in which Regent Private Capital contributed $1 million.” The post includes an interview with Vishal Sunak, Co-Founder and CEO of LinkSquares.

 

  • Also from Artificial LawyerThomson Reuters Sees AI + Blockchain Creating New Risks for Financial Services. The discussion is about compliance issues and there’s a link to a full report.

 

  • From American (not Artificial) Lawyer: Orrick Snags Weil Gotshal’s Patent Litigation Co-Chair (Jared Bobrow). Explaining the hire, “Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe chairman Mitchell Zuklie believes Silicon Valley is on the cusp of a new wave of IP litigation. Instead of networking and smartphones, the new flash points will likely involve blockchain, artificial intelligence, connected vehicles and virtual reality.” Here’s the link.

 

  • “Seyfarth Shaw LLP announced today the formal launch of its Blockchain Technologies team, an interdisciplinary group of lawyers who counsel clients and interface with regulators to address legal issues raised by blockchain technology. Seyfarth’s Blockchain Technologies team comprises attorneys with a variety of legal practices – including Corporate, Securities, Labor & Employment, Litigation, Derivatives, Real Estate, Banking, International, Tax, Employee Benefits and Immigration Compliance….” Details here.

 

  • “Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP and client Ocwen Financial Corporation, … have been named 2018 ACC Value Champions by the Association of Corporate Counsel” for a “due-diligence model enabled documents to be prioritized and fed into a custom platform that utilized artificial intelligence-enabled automatic text summarization and guided review.” (Better, faster, cheaper.)

 

  • From Jones DayFDA Permits Marketing of First Autonomous Artificial Intelligence-Based Medical Device.

 

  • The US and UK are formally cooperating on the military use of AI. “Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson announced the launch of a new artificial intelligence hub as he hosted the first ever joint US-UK Defence Innovation Board meeting yesterday (21 May) to explore important areas of co-operation that will maintain military edge into the future.” Details here.

 

  • This is sooooo not the world I grew up in. Take the Big Three automakers for instance. Ford recently announced that it’s stopping production of all passenger cars except the Mustang, and in this post from Fortune, Mary Barra, the female (yahoo!!!) CEO of GM discusses the company’s reinvention as a tech enterprise. Among her thoughts: “(a)utonomous technology that’s safer than a car with a human driver is coming, and it’s going to get better and better and better with technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning.” “In October she unveiled an audacious aspirational goal to focus everyone on a set of long-term targets: zero accidents, zero emissions, and zero congestion.” Hear! Hear!

 

  • Also from that issue of Fortune: “In our survey of Fortune 500 CEOs this year, a majority of respondents—54%—said AI was “very important” to the future of their companies. That’s up from just 39% last year, and far more than those who cited other technologies like advanced robotics (19%), virtual reality (16%), blockchain (14%), 3-D printing (13%) or drones (6%) as very important.” (I haven’t been able to find an explanation of the research methodology online, but prior years’ surveys have been almost a perfect census of the targeted CEOs, so sampling error is irrelevant and non-response bias is trivial.)

 

  • Google’s Duplex may not be alone in passing the Turing Test. Seems Microsoft has done it in Chinese! “While Google Duplex, which lets AI mimic a human voice to make appointments and book tables through phone calls, has mesmerised people with its capabilities and attracted flak on ethical grounds at the same time, Microsoft has showcased a similar technology it has been testing in China. At an AI event in London on Tuesday, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella revealed that the company’s Xiaoice social chat bot has 500 million “friends” and more than 16 channels for Chinese users to interact with it through WeChat and other popular messaging services.” Details here.
  • From Artificial Lawyer: Thomson Reuters is again turning to AI tools, now with a contract remediation system to help companies review and repaper legal agreements ahead of Brexit. In this case it will be using AI company Logical Construct, which leverages a combination of natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning techniques to achieve its extraction results.

 

  • From Patent Docs: FDA Permits Marketing of First AI-based Medical Device; Signals Fast Track Approach to Artificial Intelligence.

 

  • SINGAPORE (Reuters) – In the not too distant future, surveillance cameras sitting atop over 100,000 lampposts in Singapore could help authorities pick out and recognize faces in crowds across the island-state. Some top officials in Singapore played down the privacy concerns. Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said last week that the Smart Nation project was aimed at improving people’s lives and that he did not want it done in a way “which is overbearing, which is intrusive, which is unethical”.

 

  • Google and AI Ethics: “After it emerged last month that Google was working with the Defense Department on a project for analyzing drone footage using “artificial intelligence” techniques, Google’s employees were not happy.” “(M)ore than 3,000 of the employees signed a letter to CEO Sundar Pichai, demanding that the company scrap the deal.” “Google Cloud chief Diane Greene … told employees Google was ‘drafting a set of ethical principles to guide the company’s use of its technology and products.’” “…Greene promised Google wouldn’t sign up for any further work on ‘Maven’ or similar projects without having such principles in place, and she was sorry the Maven contract had been signed without these internal guidelines having been formulated.”

 

  • House of Representatives Hearing: GAME CHANGERS: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PART III, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY, Subcommittee on Information Technology, APRIL 18, 2018 2:00 PM, 2154 RAYBURN HOB.
  • Better, faster, cheaper: from Artificial Lawyer, “The UK’s Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has announced a partnership with US-based legal data company, OpenText, to make use of its Axcelerate AI-driven doc review tool.The SFO said in a statement that ‘by automating document analysis, AI technology allows the SFO to investigate more quickly, reduce costs and achieve a lower error rate than through the work of human lawyers alone’.” More here from the Law Society Gazette.

 

  • Smart Contracts: More about the Accord Project: “Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, Allen & Overy (A&O), and Slaughter & May joined the Accord Project, which already has some of biggest law firms in the world as members. The project is pushing for the adoption of an open source technical and legal protocol that will accept any blockchain or distributed ledger technology – a so-called ‘blockchain agnostic’ standard.”

 

  • From Reed SmithUK government publishes the Digital Charter and reaffirms creation of the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation.

 

  • From Knobbe Martens: “According to a U.S. Food and Drug Administration press release, Viz. AI Contact application was granted De Novo premarket review to Viz.AI’s LVO Stroke Platform. According to PR Newswire, Viz.AI’s LVO Stroke Platform is the “first artificial intelligence triage software” and its approval begins “a new era of intelligent stroke care begins as regulatory approval.”

 

 

  • According to American BankerBank of America, Harvard form group to promote responsible AI. “(Cathy) Bessant, the bank’s chief operations and technology officer, wanted to bring in an academic perspective and she wanted to create a neutral place where experts from different sectors and rival companies could discuss AI and craft good policies.”

 

  • Horizon Robotics has debuted a new HD smart camera that boasts serious artificial intelligence capabilities and can identify faces with an accuracy of up to 99.7 percent, the company claims.

 

  • Ever wonder whether the text you’ve used to promote your product or service is perfectly aligned with your brand strategy? Well, “Qordoba, … today announced a revolutionary new capability for scoring emotional tone in product and marketing content.” “Qordoba’s content scoring is based on Affect Detection, a computer science discipline that applies artificial intelligence and machine learning to understand the primary emotion conveyed by written text. …, to identify the emotion associated with a specific combination of words, allowing developers and product teams to create more effective user interfaces (UI).”

 

  • Interesting, from Science Magazine: Could artificial intelligence get depressed and have hallucinations? “As artificial intelligence (AI) allows machines to become more like humans, will they experience similar psychological quirks such as hallucinations or depression? And might this be a good thing?”
  • This post on the LMA’s Strategies+ blog (originally from last month’s issue of the magazine Strategies) has a bit of a clickbait title, “AI Is the Future of Everything, Right? Not So Fast.” The actual substance is a list of seven things law firms could be doing now to improve the business of their firms. It comes with appropriate cautions by Axiom’s Mark Masson and Sean Williams–hence the title. (These guys know what they’re talking about.)

 

  • And speaking of hyperbole, how about “Law Firms Moving to iManage Records Manager 10 from LegalKEY at Exponential Pace.” No doubt that iManage seems to reel in another high profile client every few days — they’re doing very well. But I’d like to see the evidence behind the “exponential movement” in this press release. The only statistic cited is that they have doubled their revenue.

 

  • Much is being written about AI tech enabling porn producers to realistically insert the faces of celebrities onto the bodies of porn performers. “Using machine learning and AI to swap celebrities’ faces onto porn performers’ (results in) (f)ake celebrity porn seamless enough to be mistaken for the real thing. Early victims include Daisy Ridley, Gal Gadot, Scarlett Johansson, and Taylor Swift.” According to Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and the author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace, this is going to hard to stop. “There are all sorts of First Amendment problems because it’s not their real body.” Since US privacy laws don’t apply, taking these videos down could be considered censorship—after all, this is “art” that redditors have crafted, even if it’s unseemly.”

 

 

  • And from Bird & Bird, a comprehensive of Europe’s state of Competition (a.k.a., Antitrust) Law and regulation regarding “Big Data.” (Interesting that the GDPR is not mentioned.)

 

  • “The Global Legal Hackathon (globallegalhackathon.com) will arrive in South Africa for the first time next month, the Hague Institute for Innovation of Law (HiiL) announced today. … The event, set for Johanneburg, will see local innovators compete for a place at a New York showcase of the best lawtech innovations in the world.” A2J organization HiiL will host the event in association with Hogan Lovells.

 

  • Yesterday I mentioned some of the AI hype going on at Davos. There’s more. Here’s a summary.

 

  • Here’s an interesting parallel to the legal industry. It seems advertising agencies are facing the same sorts of AI threats as law firms from faster moving agencies, new types of entrants performing similar services, and clients more likely to serve themselves. From the article: ““The advertising landscape has changed dramatically in the last couple of years and the pace of change means the industry is now facing fierce competition from everywhere.” … “This has allowed for consultancies, technology, and media companies, as well as new types of advertising agencies, defined or not, to come into the industry.” I don’t expect Don Draper saw this coming.

 

  • Ireland is branding itself “the AI island.” Toward that end, the University of Limerick has launched “Ireland’s first master’s degree in artificial intelligence.” “Companies that have an AI presence established in Ireland include: Siemens, Zalando, SAP, HubSpot, Deutsche Bank, Amazon Web Services, Salesforce, Ericsson, Intel, Dell EMC, Microsoft, Fujitsu, Mastercard, Nokia Bell Labs, Huawei, LogoGrab and Soapbox Labs, to name but a few.”

On a related note, “UK teenagers (year 9 pupils) are to be taught about artificial intelligence with the launch of a new deep learning teaching kit.” “AI is already part of our everyday lives, and by the time today’s 13-year-olds are entering the workforce, it will have a significant impact on the kinds of jobs available to them,” said Beverly Clarke, the project leader.

  • It’s great to see 2018 start off without any of the AI hype that we saw in 2017. By the way, I noticed these stories this morning (italics mine):

– Google CEO Sundar Pichai said Friday on MSNBC, “AI is one of the most important things that humanity is working on. It’s more profound than, I don’t know, electricity or fire.”

– Piccadilly Group has launched NEURO, an AI business platform that will eradicate the need for one in four management consultants, saving businesses approximately $122.bn globally.

 

  • This author says “AI is the future of accounting,” but does not believe it will eliminate accountants’ jobs. Interesting. He stipulates that: “…if the AI system is well configured, it can eliminate accounting errors that are generally hard to find and thereby reduce our liability and allows us to move to a more advisory role.” I wonder how many accountants are interested in or able to assume “a more advisory role.” I have the same question, but to a lesser degree, re lawyers.

 

  • This from the ‘getting in front of crime/corruption’ desk, “a computer model based on neural networks that calculates the probability in Spanish provinces of corruption, as well as the conditions that favor it.”

 

  • Ken Grady does not get excited about developments without reason, and his recent post about MDR Labs shows real enthusiasm for this effort to actually DO something in LegalTech. He and several luminaries serve on the Lab’s advisory board. Details here.

 

  • Jones Day just posted this brief on “FDA’s Evolving Regulation of Artificial Intelligence in Digital Health Products.”

 

  • Perkins Coie announced that Matt Kirmayer has joined the firm’s San Francisco office as a partner. His portfolio includes AI clients.

 

  • As this year progresses. I expect it will be increasingly difficult to separate cybersecurity from AI. So, I find it noteworthy that Cooley just added three more cybersecurity partners.

 

  • Just what we need, another entrant into the “using AI for contracts” space. I think this one (Evisort) deserves note because it was created by students at Harvard Law.

 

  • More from Philip Segal, something of a follow up to my reference yesterday. In this one, he cautions that lawyers face ethical problems if they don’t keep track of (and accept responsibility for) what their AI systems are doing. “…(T)oo much passivity in the use of AI is not only inefficient. It also carries the risk of ethical violations.”

 

  • iManage was just named a winner in the Best Use of Technology category at the Eclipse Proclaim Modern Law Awards for its innovative use of AI technology by the Serious Fraud Office (as opposed to the Comical Fraud Office?), a UK-governmental department in charge of prosecuting complex cases of fraud and corruption. SFO recently utilized iManage’s RAVN artificial intelligence (AI) platform to help a team of investigators sift through 30 million documents. Details here.

 

  • Here’s a lengthy but engaging narrative about how one firm embraced (or rather will embrace) Machine Learning and other technologies to improve client service and quality of life for its lawyers. “Science Fiction – A Day in the Life of a Lawyer in 2030.”

 

  • Well, we’ve heard from just about everyone else, and now Pope Francis has weighed in on AI: “Artificial intelligence, robotics and other technological innovations must be so employed that they contribute to the service of humanity and to the protection of our common home, rather than to the contrary.” Hard to argue with that sentiment, but the devil will be in the details.

Along those lines, Element.AI — which last year raised $102 million to work with charities, non-governmental organizations and others on “AI for good,” is opening an outpost in London, its first international expansion.

 

  • After a few delays, the first Amazon Go store opened to the public in Seattle yesterday with no cashiers or checkout lines. They haven’t announced any plans for more stores, but remember, Amazon now owns Whole Foods.

 

  • I’m sure many of my readers are tired of my warnings about AI’s coming exacerbation of our wealth inequality crisis (yes, “crisis”). If so, skip this post. If not, you may find this report from the World Economic Forum’s annual summit (based on research by Deloitte) interesting. It focuses mainly in income inequality in India, China and South Africa.