There was very little real AI or blockchain news over the holidays, especially legal-related. But there was a plethora of posts reviewing 2018 and forecasting 2019 and beyond, so that’s the focus of this post. I suggest you skim these titles and then skim through the lists included in most of the posts; you’re likely

  • This article is an outsider’s look at AI’s applicability to legal work. Legal AI: How Machine Learning Is Aiding — and Concerning — Law Practitioners.
  • Here, Skadden has more to say about the Export Control Reform Act. “The review process is expected to focus on cutting-edge technologies, including robotics; artificial intelligence; machine

  • Predictive analytics are going to be huge in the business (and practice) of law. This is my favorite example so far. “DLA Piper brought in Axiom Consulting Partners to assist in building a predictive-learning model that predicted with 75-80 percent accuracy those clients that will shrink or go dormant in the next year.” Check out

  • Here’s a follow-up to yesterday’s deep dive into facial recognition. Following protests from “rights and privacy groups” such as the ACLU, Orlando Police End Test Of Amazon’s Real-Time Facial ‘Rekognition’ System.

And this post about smart cities (How Cities Are Getting Smart Using Artificial Intelligence) includes a few thoughts about AI, facial

  • Facial recognition AI has been in the news and on my mind a lot lately. Of course, there are legal implications, but regardless of that aspect, these developments are a big deal of which you should be aware.

– Traveling this 4th of July? Orlando’s airport has rolled out facial recognition for all departing passengers

  • I really like this post by Tony Joyner, a partner in Herbert Smith Freehills’ Perth office. (The Inevitable Surprise: How Technology Will Change What We Do.) It provides excellent insights underscored by interesting quotes from the likes of Jack Welch, Pablo Picasso and the British Post Office.
  • Make time for this insightful