• Legalweek (formerly Legaltech) is just a few days away, so here’sA Beginner’s Guide To The Biggest Week In Legal Technology.

 

  • Data & Analytics: Transforming Law Firms” has just been published by ALM Intelligence and LexisNexis. Here’s an executive summary and link to the report.

 

  • Here’s a fresh essay about law firm innovation from  of Thomson Reuters Legal Managed ServicesGreasing The Gears Of Legal Commerce — Automatic, Systematic, Hydromatic (alt.legal) Innovation. “CLOs indicated that nearly 25 percent of outside counsel fees are “price-insensitive.”

 

  • The Big 4 continue their relentless march into legal. I skip most of these posts, but this one specifically mentions AI: KPMG expands Asia Pacific legal services. “It will also offer technology enabled legal services, using robotics, artificial intelligence and other technologies developed globally and in China through the KPMG digital ignition centre.”

 

  • This is an interesting post by Charles P. Edwards of Barnes & Thornburg: The Noisy Business of the Law and Insurance Claims. “…(T)he idea we humans are needed for most decisions is an ‘illusion.'”

 

  • Here’s a good example of a law firm (Amsterdam’s De Brauw) using tech as a differentiating marketing strategyHop on board and experience the value of legal tech and project management.

 

  • Bob Ambrogi posted this 47-minute podcast: LawNext Episode 25: Using AI to Enhance Virtual Receptionists, with Smith.ai.

 

  • From Arup Das of Alphaserve Technologies, here’s an interesting discussion of the age-old build vs. buy conundrum: How to Approach Legal Innovation: Options for Every Firm.

 

  • This is a thought-provoking post: Can Deepfakes Pose a Cybersecurity Threat to Legal? ““Deepfakes are real and emerging as an issue but they, like certain types of technology, could emerge very quickly; we talk about this today and it could be a very big deal in six months or it could be nothing,” Reed Smith’s Stegmaier cautioned. “We simply don’t know.””

 

  • This hour-long podcast is from the Lawyerist: “In this episode with Natalie Worsfold, we talk about her law firm’s approach to law practice, and why more firms aren’t following suit. We start by asking Natalie what problem Counter Tax was trying to solve, then explore how they solved it, what their solution does now, and the plans they have to evolve and grow their solution.”

 

  • This is an idea I have been kicking around for a while. Nick Hilborne gives it the thought I believe it’s due: “Reproduction of the legal profession” at risk from automation. “If junior associates are ‘gradually culled’ from law firms as a result of automation, the entire reproduction of the legal profession could be jeopardised….'” And here’s a US write up of the same issue: Junior Lawyers Are Going Extinct And Nobody Knows What To Do About It.

 

  • AI Goes to Court: A Conversation With Lex Machina and Dorsey & Whitney. Post here.

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

  • The Benefits of the LexisNexis LegalTech Accelerator. Post here.
  • EY and Artificial Lawyer Hold Legal Ops + Technology Event.  Post here.
  • Slaughter and May Names 3rd Fast Forward Cohort, Inc. Blockchain Co. Post here.
  • Meet ATJ Bot – The World’s First Legal Aid Voice Assistant. Post here.
  • How to Build Your Business Case For Contract Management – The Juro Guide. Post here.
  • Oz + NZ Professional Services Startup of the Year Award Launched. Post here.
  • Legal AI Co. CourtQuant Predicts Hard Brexit Impact on British Law. Post here.
  • Christian Lang + Former TR Boss, Tom Glocer, Join Reynen Court. Post here.
  • GCs Keen To Embrace Tech Tools + Legal Ops Skills – Survey. Post here. (Note: This story is based on a survey where n=80. Assuming no other methodological problems [big assumption!], this means that in all of the findings each number is well within the margin of sampling error of the statistics above and below it on the graphs.)
  • Meet Fincap Law: A New Tech-Driven Firm For the New Legal Era. Post here.

 

Posts by Law Firms:

 

 

 

 

 

  • Eric A. Klein and Aytan Dahukey of Sheppard Mullin posted: Day 2 Notes From The 2019 JPMorgan Healthcare Conference. “We are seeing a lot of healthcare entities starting to focus on precision medicine – artificial intelligence suggesting which oncology drug works best for your specific genetic condition and cancer – but that essentially is a transactional function. And the market really wants a partnering function ” Post here.

 

 

 

  • From Reed SmithDraft ethics guidelines for trustworthy artificial intelligence published by the European Commission. Post here.

 

 

  • Akin Gump postedPolicymakers Focused on Artificial Intelligence, Write Akin Gump Lawyers in The Journal of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence & Law.

 

  • Hogan Lovells postedLitigating intellectual property issues: The impact of AI and machine learning.

 

Press Releases and sponsored posts:

  • Here’s a thorough explanation of Gavelytics: Want Better Litigation Outcomes? Know Your Judges. “…(W)ith Gavelytics, you finally get the quantifiable and reliable judge information you need to customize your litigation strategy and increase your chances of winning.”

 

 

  • Gibson Dunn launches AI and automated systems group. Post here.

 

  • The world’s first virtual lawyer, built for Amazon’s Alexa, tests whether lawyers will be replaced by robots. “Australian legal-technology company Smarter Drafter have announced a prototype virtual lawyer, built on Amazon’s Alexa, that creates legal.” documents instantly, just like a real human lawyer. Here’s the Smart Drafter release. Hype much?? And then there’s this: “No date has been set for the release of the first working Alexa integration.”

 

  • HaystackID Acquires eDiscovery Managed Services Provider eTERA, Release here.

 

  • Legal IT Newswire New Product News… Alphaserve Technologies launch Execution as a Service. Post here.

 

  • I’m including this because I used to work there! Am Law 200 Firm Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie Selects Litera Desktop, Litera Microsystems Full Document Drafting Suite.

 

Blockchain

 

 

 

 

  • From the Baker & Hostetler Energy BlogNew Blockchain Products, an FBI Raid, the $11 Billion Bitcoin Case, Hackers Strike With a 51 Percent Attack and Crypto Tax Analysis. Post here.

 

 

  • Here’s a deep dive into the legal services offered by Oath ProtocolThe Lay of the Land in Blockchain Dispute Resolution and Governance Designs.
  • O’Melveny is getting a lot of coverage of its recent announcement that it will use neuroscience-based games in its recruitment process. See stories here, here, here and here.

 

  • This post was prepared by Kurt Watkins of Contextum and Matthew Savare of Lowenstein Sandler and published by the ACC via Lexology: The Rise of Artificial Intelligence and its Impact on General Counsel. It’s a solid deep dive and includes specific advice for GCs. “The technological advancement of AI and its concomitant increased adoption in the legal profession cannot be stopped. For many years, lawyers believed that AI would not impact them or their profession. Think again. In order to stay ahead of the proverbial curve, general counsel need to understand this transformation, adjust their ways of thinking….”

 

  • Seyfarth’s Hannah L. JacksonRaymond Tran and Theodore E. Woodward postedWave Of The Future: The Effect Of AI And Robotics On Commercial Real Estate. It’s a solid, rather in-depth look. “Advancements in AI robotics and integration with the IoT have the potential to change the way that commercial properties are owned, leased, managed and operated in the future.”

 

  • The Centre for Information Policy Leadership (“CIPL”) at Hunton Andrews Kurth recently published the first report in its project on Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) and Data Protection: Delivering Sustainable AI Accountability in Practice. The report, entitled “Artificial Intelligence and Data Protection in Tension” aims to describe in clear, understandable terms: what AI is and how it is being used all around us today; the role that personal data plays in the development, deployment and oversight of AI; and the opportunities and challenges presented by AI to data protection laws and norms.” Overview here.

 

  • This, from DLA Piper: International Trade Alert. “The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) on November 19, 2018 requesting public comment on identifying ’emerging technology.’ Under the Export Control Reform Act of 2018 (ECRA), which was signed into law on August 13, 2018, the Department of Commerce is authorized to establish export controls on emerging and foundational technologies under the framework of the Commerce Control List (CCL). In the ANPRM, BIS indicated that it will issue a separate ANPRM for ‘foundational technology’.”

 

  • The Alliott Group (Maciej Kokotposted: An Alternative Perspective On Use Of Artificial Intelligence In Professional Firms. “This article, written by Alliott Group Polish accounting and law firm member ALTO, provides an alternative perspective on AI’s role in the mid-size firm. Authors Maciej Kokot and Wojciech Kokot propose we question the preconceptions and fears we have surrounding AI, and instead invite accountants and lawyers to familiarise themselves with its capabilities. From automating rudimentary accounting services to streamlining first-line support using chatbots, this article outlines why we have every reason to feel positively about the rise of AI.”

 

  • This post is from Switzerland’s Bär & Karrer‘s Andrew M. GarbarskiThe Sealing Of Evidence Under Swiss Criminal Procedure Law. “The fast-changing technical landscape and the potentially endless capabilities of artificial intelligence may ultimately offer better solutions for judicial authorities and practitioners alike. However, in the meantime, both must turn towards the case law of the SFSC to find practical ways of dealing with the increasing complexity of unsealing procedures.”

 

  • If you’re interested in how the Skunkworks approach to innovation adoption can work at a law firm (I am!), check out this podcast interview with Orrick’s Chair, Mitch Zullie.

 

  • Here’s a rather academic piece from the University of Toronto — Faculty of Law’s Benjamin Alarie, Anthony Niblett and Albert YoonHow Artificial Intelligence Will Affect the Practice of Law. “In the short run, we can expect greater legal transparency, more efficient dispute resolution, improved access to justice, and new challenges to the traditional organization of private law firms delivering legal services on a billable hour basis through a leveraged partner-associate model.” “In the longer term, it is difficult to predict the impact of artificially intelligent tools will be, as lawyers incorporate them into their practice and expand their range of services on behalf of clients.”

 

  • “A subsidiary of the German arm of Clifford Chance has entered into a partnership to advance the development of an AI platform. Clifford Chance Tech GmbH and German firm EVANA will work together to enhance EVANA’s platform for corporate law and M&A transactions.” More here, here and here.

 

  • In this post, Law Society Council member, addresses the question, “…if you are going to receive advice or even representation from either a solicitor or a robot with artificial intelligence, should the criteria for the product be the same in each case?” Interesting read.

 

  • Dentons’ Todd D. DaubertPeter G. FeldmanJason M. Silverman and Michael E. Zolandz posted: BIS Begins Process For Export Controls Of “Emerging And Foundational” Technologies: What Tech Companies Need To Know. “On November 19, the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), which controls the export of sensitive dual-use and less-sensitive military goods and technology, took an important preliminary step in establishing the review and control process required under ECRA. The agency published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM), soliciting comments from the public on specific matters related to identifying and controlling emerging and foundational technologies.” More here.

 

  • Also from Dentons (this time, Eric J. TanenblattCrawford Schneider and James A. Richardson): Autonomous Vehicles Start Act Legislative Update. “Republicans are eager to finally advance a light-touch autonomous vehicle regulatory framework after the proposal has languished for more than a year in committee over cyber and safety concerns.”

 

  • Here’s part 6 of Mintz’ Strategies To Unlock AI’s Potential In Healthcare, Commercialization Of AI Tools In Healthcare – The Challenge Of Securing Adequate Data Rights.

 

  • A blog on behalf of CILEx Regulation by Eve Dullabh, managing director of the Law Training Centre in Kent: Reality versus the robot lawyers. “…(L)egal training will be required to adapt accordingly to provide the skills to the modern lawyer in order to remain indispensable in the era of AI technology. Cyber-security training, management of risk training and coding will, inevitably, become part of every lawyer’s legal training and, already, some of the top firms in the country have recognised this and instructed that all their trainees undertake coding training. The future is now and embracing the evolution of the new legal era will prepare us for the things to come.”

 

  • Steven D. Lofchie of Cadwalader postedFRB Governor Brainard Focuses On Risks And Supervisory Approaches Associated With AI. “Federal Reserve Board (“FRB”) Governor Lael Brainard urged firms to be mindful of risks associated with artificial intelligence (‘AI’) innovation and advised regulators to remain diligent in the quest to understand and regulate the use of AI by supervised firms.”

 

  • Also from Steven D. Lofchie, FDIC Chair McWilliams Urges More Collaboration On FinTech. “In remarks delivered at the FinTech and the New Financial Landscape Conference, Ms. McWilliams underscored that innovation is expanding bank access to more customers, and that new technology has enhanced ‘customer experience, [lowered] transaction costs, and increase[d] credit availability’.”

 

  • WilmerHale‘s Timothy Syrett and Natalie R. Pous prepared this articleThe Developing Landscape Of Internet Of Things Standards For Cars, “the first in a series of five articles written by WilmerHale discussing how the emergence of IoT technologies will impact the automotive industry. “The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the connection of a multitude of devices through the Internet to collect and exchange data. One area of particular promise for the IoT is cars. Exchanges of data between cars on a street, between cars and pedestrians crossing the street, between cars and traffic lights on the street, and between cars and the Internet could improve safety, reduce traffic, save fuel, and make for a more entertaining drive.”

 

  • And here‘s a closely related article, also from Wilmer (this time by Christian DuvernoyFrédéric LouisDr. Martin BraunAnne ValleryItsiq Benizri and Naboth van den Broek): The European Commission Launches A Public Consultation On Connected And Automated Vehicles. “The ambition of the European Union (“EU”) is to become a world leader in the deployment of connected and automated mobility. The EC believes that driverless mobility and connectivity will help bring down the number of road fatalities and reduce harmful emissions and congestion. In this context, the EC published a Communication in which it identified the actions it would take to guide the sector and EU countries to reach its objectives. One of these actions is to issue a Recommendation to complement the regulatory framework for connected and automated mobility and to help EU countries achieve a coordinated approach in this respect.”

 

 

 

  • From Jones DayDriverless, Networked Vehicles on the Rise, French Liability Regulations Lag Behind. “The Situation: Autonomous cars with incorporated artificial intelligence (“AI”) are now a reality whereas French regulations have yet to adjust. The Issue: The phenomenon of new autonomous cars using AI gives rise to questions about how product liability principles will apply and adapt thereto. Looking Ahead: Carmakers should already be considering what liability risks could be created by incorporating AI in autonomous cars and how to mitigate such risks.”

 

  • Andy Neill of HighQ postedWhat’s artificial about ethical AI in the law? Everything. “Lawyers are trained and have studied ethics. They must be utilised to succeed in creating ethical AI programs.” It’s an interesting read.

 

  • Here’s an important and useful study conducted by Dentons: Dentons submits results of research into the development of global legislation in robotics, AI and cyberphysical systems. “Dentons global law firm has carried out unique, large-scale research of the development of law and legislation on robotics, artificial intelligence and cyberphysical systems. The research was commissioned by the Competency Center for Statutory Regulation of the Digital Economy, which operates at the Skolkovo Foundation. It is the first such research done in Russia.”

 

  • This post is from Hungary’s KCG Partners Law FirmFree Flow Of Non-Personal Data In The European Union. “According to the communication of the European Parliament, the Council of the EU will adopt the regulation in the coming weeks, before it will enter into force by the end of the year. The Member States will have 6 months to apply the new rules from the date of the formal adoption of the regulation.”

 

  • Here’s a taste of what to expect at the “Emerging Legal Departments: Legal Tech 101” roundtable (Evolve the Law, Above the Law’s Legal Innovation Center at Logikcull’s San Francisco headquarters) on December 5. Monica Zent and Stephanie Corey will lead the discussion.

 

  • From José Santacroce of Moeller IP Advisors we have: The European Patent Office (EPO) Publishes New Guidelines On Computer-Implemented Inventions (CII). “…(T)he new EPO CII Guidelines include for the first time new sections on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), and on Simulation, design or modelling.” Post here.

 

  • Philip Cupitt of Marks & Clerk posted: Artificial Intelligence: Is Your Business Ready? “Our own research at Marks & Clerk reveals that more than 78,000 patent applications relating to AI were filed around the world in 2017. On current trends, we’ll see around 86,000 such patent applications filed in 2018, which represents almost a twofold increase in the past decade.”

 

  • Government invests to research how AI can improve the law was posted on Legal Futures by Dan Bindman, “The government is funding research into the potential for artificial intelligence (AI) to improve the legal system, with a warning that, if the technology is mishandled, it could have dire consequences. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) will fund three research projects into aspects of AI costing £3m, of which ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for law’ is one.”

 

  • HBR Consulting postedLaw firms must act with urgency to keep pace with law department analytics maturity. “…(L)aw departments are gathering, centralizing and sharing more data than ever, and many law firms are lagging behind.”

 

  • Law schools are often (and often justifiably) accused of not keeping pace with innovations in the business of law. But here are some noteworthy exceptions: You Think Legal Education Can’t Change? 8 Innovative Ideas from Law Schools.

 

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

– Few GCs Have ‘Digital Transformation Skills’ – LawGeex Report. Link.

– Nordic Law Firms Go All-In For Legal AI, (Especially Luminance), But Why? Link.

– UK Gov + MoJ Back Major Research Project to Boost Legal AI Use. Link.

– Relativity Partner QDiscovery Buys Evidox in eDiscovery Consolidation Move. Link.

 

Blockchain

 

  • Smart Contracts May Have Weaknesses. This Tool Helps Find Them. “ released a blockchain security monitoring service that includes a tool by ConsenSys Diligence allowing users to scan smart contracts for vulnerabilities.” Story here.

 

  • Pinsent Masons postedMEPs call for business GDPR ‘guarantee’ on using blockchain. “Businesses should not begin using blockchain technology to process personal data until they can ‘guarantee compliance’ with EU data protection laws, a committee of MEPs has said.”

 

 

  • This, from Sheppard Mullin: United States: The Hammer Falls On The First Major Blockchain-Based Art Auction. “Christie’s made history again last night during its evening sale, An American Place: The Barney A. Ebsworth Collection, at 20 Rockefeller Center in New York. This time, the history was not in the form of a record-setting sale (though the sale brought in $317.8 million), but as the first major art auction to be recorded by distributed ledger technology.”

 

 

  • Here’s a blockchain milestone: “Abu Dhabi-headquartered Al Hilal Bank has carried a blockchain-based transaction for an Islamic bond worth $500 million. The bank, an investment arm of the Abu Dhabi government, announced Monday that it settled the Islamic, shariah-compliant bond, or sukuk, worth $500 million on the secondary market, using blockchain tech.”

 

  • And here’s another: Real Estate on the Blockchain: $20 Million Sale ‘. “In the first offering of its kind, U.S. investors can now acquire a piece of South Carolina real estate in the form of blockchain tokens. The tokens represent ownership in a luxury student residence called The Hub … which is located near the University of South Carolina in the state’s capital.”

 

  • This is an interesting article from the December issue of the ABA JournalWhat do AI, blockchain and GDPR mean for cybersecurity? “…(W)e close this series by looking around the bend to understand how major emerging technologies will affect cybersecurity in the coming years. While experts disagree when technologies such as artificial intelligence and blockchain will play a larger role in cybersecurity and data protection, there is broad agreement that their roles will be pivotal. This could, in turn, create new solutions, risks and regulatory headaches.”

This is shaping up to be a slow week in legal AI, so this post will be almost entirely devoted to giving you a taste of what’s going on in the wider AI world.

  • Here are Five of the scariest predictions about artificial intelligence.

 

  • And in a kinda similar vein, here’s Debunking 8 Myths About AI in the Workplace.

 

  • AI is moving into HR in several ways. A few are discussed hereThe 4 trends changing recruitment, and the opportunities that they provide for background screening.

 

  • Artificial Intelligence: A net positive for banks. “The steady increase of AI in banking, however, will likely have both positive and negative impacts on the banking industry.” Details here.

 

  • AI is improving Business Intelligence (BI) by helping us ask better questions. “For example, AI is starting to allow BI technology to:
    • Tell you what question you should have asked, instead of just answering the one you did.
    • Provide relevant, interesting, additional insights about the question you did ask.
    • Identify anomalies in the data that might be actionable and proactively alert a business person that action may need to be taken—even if they’ve never asked a question about that dataset in the past.”

More here.

 

  • Using artificial intelligence, researchers are teaching a computer to read the Vatican’s secret archives. Coverage here and here.

 

 

  • And speaking of healthcare, here’s Expert Insights: The Future of Drug Discovery Looks to be in the Hands of Artificial Intelligence.

 

 

  • Chinese search engine giant Baidu is using AI to drive ad sales and it appears to be paying off. “Company reported a record $3.93 billion in quarterly revenue as net income soared 45%.” Details from the WSJ here.

 

  • As we become more used to talking to computers and other devices, chatbots are poised to take over B2C and even B2B customer service (and your website). Here’s Why AI is The Next Revolution In Customer Service.

 

  • The other world powers are involved, so it’s no surprise that: India considering military usage of Artificial Intelligence. for Defence told the Lok Sabha that the ministry has initiated the process of preparing Indian defence forces in their use of and leveraging India’s capabilities in sectors.”

 

 

  • Here’s an interesting blockchain story from the WSJ: Nestlé Blockchain Test Traces Ingredients From Suppliers to the Mouths of Babes.

 

  • From the Australian edition of the Daily Mail (of course), here’s Inside a sex robot factory: The frighteningly realistic ‘breed’ of AI-equipped androids – and why the popular ‘female’ has a Scottish accent. It’s pretty much safe for work. There’s a male version in the works.

 

And here are just a couple of bits re the legal world.

 

  • From Cooley: “The European Commission recently announced that Croatia has become the last Member State to sign the Declaration of Cooperation on Artificial Intelligence. As discussed in our recent blog, the Declaration commits all Member States to cooperate on an EU wide AI strategy. The EC’s strategy is part of a wider programme to develop digital skills and to invest heavily in research and innovation. Part of that strategy will involve coordinating funding across Europe to create synergies. The EC has recognized that AI is an area where you must invest to see results and has proposed a budget of €2.5 billion to assist with the adoption of AI across Europe.”

 

  • From Above the Law: How Artificial Intelligence is Transforming Legal Research. Quotes include, “It’s not technology for the sake of technology.” and “It might be more fun to use cutting-edge technology to solve a problem, but sometimes we might use older technology, depending on the issue.” “The goal is always solving the problem and helping the customer.”

 

  • It’s legal, but this is from Wired Magazine: Despite Pledging Openness, Companies Rush to Patent AI Tech.

 

  • “Clifford Chance (CC) has launched a new training contract focused on legal technology, as the firm looks to nurture up-and-coming talent with an aptitude for areas such as fintech, coding and artificial intelligence. The pilot scheme, called IGNITE, will start in autumn 2021…. The positions, which will be open to law and non-law students, will sit alongside CC’s existing training contracts, and include traditional seat rotations. At the end of the contract, successful trainees will have the opportunity to join one of CC’s key practice areas: capital markets, corporate, dispute resolution, employment, finance, real estate and tax.” More here.

 

  • From Law.com: Law Firms Need Artificial Intelligence to Stay in the Game, “The Legal Department Is Savvier and Has More Options In the Form of ASPs and Legal Technology. It’s Time for Law Firms to Embrace Change. AI Is a Key Ingredient In Doing So.”

 

 

  • Epstein Becker posted this four-minute video post with firm member, Michelle Capezza, Interview – Artificial Intelligence in the Workplace. It’s about “the future workforce” but barely touches on AI.

 

  • Also from EpsteinHealth Plan Insurance on the Blockchain: An Interview with James Schutzer, Vice President, JDM Benefits. “From the repeal of the individual mandate penalty, expansion of association health plans, State proposals to increase taxes on insurers, referenced-based pricing and new “blockchain” models to purchase services directly for employees, the insured markets will be under increasing stress to survive. It is possible that these trends will accelerate the collapse of the insurance markets and usher in a government provided single payer system, and/or self-directed mode of procuring healthcare via blockchain technology.” (Only a small part of the interview is about blockchain.)

 

  • Knobbe Martens partner Bridget A. Smith authored this story (Cryptocurrency and Blockchain) from the Orange County Business Journal. “…(S)trategic application of IP law is also critical to a robust future for cryptocurrency and other blockchain-related technologies. Protecting IP rights and avoiding potentially infringing activity will become increasingly important to both innovators and prospective investors as blockchain continues to disrupt business as usual.”

 

  • From Michael VolkovArtificial Intelligence, Hype and Financial Misconduct. ” (A)rtificial intelligence or machine learning has had an impact in two areas: financial misappropriation and due diligence.” “Fraud detection requires a holistic approach to harness artificial intelligence and detection strategies.  A multi-layered approach may be an effective way to balance a company’s strategy.  The challenge is to translate artificial intelligence into actionable intelligence.”

 

  • Womble’s Roseyna Jahangir authored this in-depth analysis, Artificial intelligence versus regulation: friends or foes? “By working together to balance potentially competing factors such as technological development and consumer protection, regulators and the industry may be able to provide a stable platform to develop AI, while overcoming or at least assuaging the potential fears of the target audience for these developments. In 2001: a Space Odyssey, the conflict between AI and humans was only resolved by the ‘death’ of the AI. Let’s hope that in real life, a way of co-existence can be found instead.”

 

  • Daniel Millard of Cooley postedAI’ll Be There For You: European Commission Appoints Expert Group to Advise on AI. “With its deep industry knowledge and breadth of industry contacts, the AI HLG will seek to ensure that the Commission achieves its aim of making the EU a world-leader in the development of AI technology.”

 

  • This half hour audio post from Marlene Gebauer and Greg Lambert (The Geek in Review) summarizes the proceedings of the recent AALL conference, including several AI touchpoints.

 

  • I don’t subscribe to Michigan Lawyers Weekly, but just the title of this article says something about how far we’ve come: Can consent to search be obtained via Google Translate?

 

  • There continues to be a LOT of AI deal volume and, of course, concomitant legal work. According to PwC, Report: AI Drives VC Investment as Canada Hits $900 Million USD for Second Straight Quarter.

 

  • AI you can use! (Well, maybe someday.) In Japan, ‘flying umbrella’ frees hands. “Essentially a small unmanned aircraft, the umbrella utilizes artificial intelligence to hover above users as they walk.”

 

  • In this presentation, (Mark Cuban on dangers of A.I.: If you don’t think Terminator is coming, ‘you’re crazy’) Mark Cuban presents several warnings about AI, from jobs to warfare.
  • READ THIS from Helen Gunnarsson of the ABA via Bloomberg Law, reporting on the panel, “Ethics Issues in Lawyers’ Use of Artificial Intelligence,” that took place May 31 at the 44th ABA National Conference on Professional Responsibility in Louisville: Billable Hour ‘Makes No Sense’ in an AI World. “The panelists provided examples of how the use of artificial intelligence can enhance lawyers’ efficiency.” “Panelists see a future where lawyer’s failure to use AI will be ethical lapse, malpractice liability.”

 

  • This essay from Richard Tromans the founder of Tromans Consulting and Artificial Lawyer is also very much worth reading: Law Firms are Inefficiency Factories, Automation is the Cure. “…(T)he real issue is this: if automation can help, even fractionally (and I’d argue it can help a lot more than that), why are law firms so slow to adopt this technology? The answer is of course: many lawyers observe that selling inefficiency is a pillar of their livelihoods.”

 

  • This blog by Aird Berlis continues to provide links to relevant AI content. They don’t provide a lot, but for each item referenced they provide a “key quote” and “why it matters.” (I wish I had time to be so thorough with each of my references.)

 

  • Here’s another blog that covers legal AI (among other things), They hit some of the same stories that you’ll find here and more. “Here’s what’s trending in the legal industry: legal entrepreneurs, alternative business structures for law firms, legal tech for law departments, law firms and change, problems at Norton Rose, the future of artificial intelligence and more!”

 

  • Goldman Sachs is backing a London startup that uses AI to read complex legal documents. “London-based Eigen uses artificial intelligence technology to read legal and financial documents, making it easier for lawyers and bankers to analyse complex contracts — everything from derivatives to land deeds — and find specific clauses. Goldman Sachs is a customer, as are Linklaters, Evercore, and ING.” More here.

 

  • Baker McKenzie launches artificial intelligence robot in Paris. “Baker McKenzie has launched AI personal assistant Lancelaw, providing its lawyers with a weekly selection of both relevant and personalised news on the transformation of the law profession as well as innovation.” (Note: so far, this is for internal use.)

More about law firm chatbots here.

Law firms have a LONG way to go to catch up to chatbots in financial services. “Bank of America today announced that it has surpassed 1 million users on Erica, the first widely available AI-driven virtual assistant in financial services, available to clients in its mobile banking app. The milestone was reached within two months of completing its phased rollout, making Erica available to mobile clients nationwide.”

 

  • This from Norton Rose. “The European Commission has labelled AI as one of the most strategic technologies of the 21st Century (so far of course) and has proposed a three-pronged approach to EU members which is worth considering….”

 

  • This from Deloitte: “Leading organizations are increasingly integrating human and machine intelligence for forensic investigations. By combining technological analysis—including artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and statistical concepts of cognitive analytics—with deep investigator understanding of fraudster motives and methods, many are identifying, investigating and thwarting fraud schemes more effectively and efficiently than ever before.”

 

 

  • From our creepy AI desk: “MIT is using radar and artificial intelligence to sense people’s postures and movement, even through a wall.” AI technique to sense posture through walls, help monitor Parkinson’s. More coverage herehere and here.

 

  • Here, from Kira Systems, is a good primer on Contract Analysis AI. Contract Analysis Software: The Technology Fundamentals.

 

  • There’s more news about contracts re: “ABBYY®, a global provider of content intelligence services, today announced the launch of ABBYY Text Analytics for Contracts, a managed service that automatically discovers insights from contracts and leases to speed up risk mitigation, obligation analysis and content migration. With Text Analytics for Contracts, businesses can leverage the entire ABBYY technology portfolio to accelerate time-to-value and successfully implement their contract lifecycle management, robotic process automation and digital transformation strategies. The new scalable managed service uses AI to dramatically accelerate business decision-making through human-like understanding of contracts.”

 

  • Press release worth reading: Fastcase, … today announces the debut of its Artificial Intelligence Sandbox alongside several law firms, each known for their innovative and tech-forward approaches to knowledge and information management. … BakerHostetler, DLA Piper, Baker Donelson, and a host of other pioneering law firms are leveraging the AI Sandbox and participating in the developers group. Fastcase’s AI Sandbox is a customized first-of-its-kind platform that allows law firms to use artificial intelligence in a secure environment to crunch their own big data, compare it with public legal data or metadata from Fastcase, and analyze it using cognitive intelligence tools such as IBM Watson Analytics and Watson Developer Cloud.

– More details here: “Among the AI tools contained in this initial release, in addition to those from Watson, are indexing and visualization software from ElasticSearch; expert system platform Neota LogicContraxSuite, a machine learning tool for contract and document analytics from LexPredict; customized expert witness content from Courtroom Insight; and more. The platform will include legal data from Fastcase as well as docket data from Docket Alarm, which Fastcase acquired in January.”

 

  • From Crowell & Moring: “Crowell & Moring Launches Digital Transformation Practice. Team Delivers Regulatory and Business Solutions for Autonomous Vehicles, 3D Printing, Digital Health, and Other Technologies”

 

  • Norton Rose reports: “…(T)he Canadian government has begun a review of Canada’s Copyright Act with a view to keep the copyright framework current in light of digital technology. Written submissions are now being solicited from all Canadians on Canada’s Copyright Act, as the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology (“Committee”) conducts its mandatory five-year review of the statute.”

And: “Global law firm Norton Rose Fulbright Global has signed up to Eagle Lab – a new law-tech incubator launched by Barclays and the Law Society. The aim of the lab is to help the UK be a leader in the field of law technology.”

 

  • Artificial Lawyer reports that, “Indian legal AI pioneer, MikeLegal, which provides legal research in areas such as IP, has now launched an NLP-driven trademark (TM) service, which offers search and an automated ‘TM watch’ capability.”

 

  • From Law.com: Reed Smith Enters the Legal Technology Market With GravityStack Subsidiary, “The firm’s new U.S. subsidiary will incubate and license legal technology, as well as offer tech counseling and managed services to law firm and legal department clients.”

 

  • When speaking about AI (e.g., yesterday), I usually start by urging folks not to get hung up on a precise definition of AI. In this piece from The ABA Journal, Jason Tashea discusses his confrontation with this ambiguity and how it will influence his reporting.

– There’s more about AI definitions in this piece from Thomson Reuters.

 

  • From Capitol Hill, specifically Congressman John K. Delaney (MD-6): “The European Union’s executive branch, the European Commission, has announced that it will increase its investment in artificial intelligence (AI) research and development by €1.5 billion and called on member states to invest €20 billion as well.” “Our economic competitors in Europe and Asia are moving forward on AI, while we stand still. I sincerely hope that today’s announcement from the EU gets the attention of Washington and serves as a wake-up call.”

 

  • This essay by Mark A. Cohen discusses disruption in the legal industry. Among his observations: “Law has become a three-legged stool supported by legal, technological and business expertise. To date, no single provider has successfully integrated the three ingredients on a scalable basis. But the evidence suggests that’s about to change.” He says change won’t occur overnight, but “The Lawyer Levee is About to Break.”

 

 

  • Thompson Hine has commissioned this report, “Closing the Innovation Gap.” It’s a methodologically sound survey of almost 200 in-house folks regarding their desire for innovation in legal services and what they’re getting from outside counsel. Spoiler alert: they’re not thrilled. The report is nicely illustrated with infographics and includes a bare minimum of self-promotion.

 

  • “Axiom launches Brexit AI product to help companies update 7.5m contracts.” Details here

 

  • From Reed Smith: “European Commission outlines blockchain development plans, calls for a feasibility study and unveils FinTech Action Plan.” Among the observations in the post: “The initiative forms part of the drive towards the digital single market, a Commission strategy to boost e-commerce, modernize regulations and promote the digital economy.”

 

  • Here’s more on French President Macron’s push to make France a world leader in AI. Of course, in Europe, anything involving data will require finesse. Additional analysis here.

 

  • This initiative by dozens of GCs to determine “which in-house and law firm management approaches work best” could be an excellent application of AI. As described here, “the data set has already grown to represent thousands of matters; as the project continues, it will encompass millions of data points allowing for a detailed analysis of many critical questions.” If data collection continues over time, as law firms and corporate counsel change behaviors and measure results, sophisticated longitudinal analysis (e.g., “AI”) could be applied to tease out cause-and-effect relationships. Could be very cool.

See also The GC Thought Leaders ExperimentAn Open Letter From 25 General Counsel

  • Does AI have more in common with Yo-Yo Ma or a lawyer? Here, Ken Grady, without ever mentioning the terms, presents an interesting take on the much discussed distinction between “Specialized AI” (a.k.a., specific, narrow, weak, vertical) and “General AI” (a.k.a., strong, super) arguing that the role of the lawyer is much more general than specialized. To me, this translates into the near term versus longer term threat to the attorney’s various roles.

[This is just a nit, but I take issue with Mr. Grady’s assertion that “(t)here is no area which receives more AI hype than law.” Lordy, no — just spend an hour or two perusing the discussion (hype) going on about AI in medicine/pharmaceuticals.]

For a bit more fine distinctions than just “general” and “specialized” AI, check out this brief post.

 

  • Here’s (link to full response at bottom) the European Commission’s initial response to its mandate to lead the way on liability rules and ethical standards for Artificial Intelligence. And here’s a bit of analysis thereof.

And here’s a bit of a flip on that; instead of regulating AI, in the UK, progress is being made on using AI to enforce financial regulations: “The Financial Conduct Authority, an independent U.K. financial regulatory body, is looking into the possible use of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine-learning tools to enforce regulatory compliance.”

 

  • If you think AI is poised to rock the legal world, just check out the agenda of Day Two of MB 2017 (MB=”Mobile Beat”) for what’s going on in retail marketing. Wow.

“Artificial intelligence is affecting the entire marketing ecosystem. Every brand, marketer, product manager and innovator must be ready to harness the disruptive impact AI is having as it pushes forward intelligent assistants, bots, smart voice and predictive analytics and more. We’ll be exploring it all over two intensive days at MB 2017.”