• Legalweek (formerly Legaltech) is just a few days away, so here’sA Beginner’s Guide To The Biggest Week In Legal Technology.

 

  • Data & Analytics: Transforming Law Firms” has just been published by ALM Intelligence and LexisNexis. Here’s an executive summary and link to the report.

 

  • Here’s a fresh essay about law firm innovation from  of Thomson Reuters Legal Managed ServicesGreasing The Gears Of Legal Commerce — Automatic, Systematic, Hydromatic (alt.legal) Innovation. “CLOs indicated that nearly 25 percent of outside counsel fees are “price-insensitive.”

 

  • The Big 4 continue their relentless march into legal. I skip most of these posts, but this one specifically mentions AI: KPMG expands Asia Pacific legal services. “It will also offer technology enabled legal services, using robotics, artificial intelligence and other technologies developed globally and in China through the KPMG digital ignition centre.”

 

  • This is an interesting post by Charles P. Edwards of Barnes & Thornburg: The Noisy Business of the Law and Insurance Claims. “…(T)he idea we humans are needed for most decisions is an ‘illusion.'”

 

  • Here’s a good example of a law firm (Amsterdam’s De Brauw) using tech as a differentiating marketing strategyHop on board and experience the value of legal tech and project management.

 

  • Bob Ambrogi posted this 47-minute podcast: LawNext Episode 25: Using AI to Enhance Virtual Receptionists, with Smith.ai.

 

  • From Arup Das of Alphaserve Technologies, here’s an interesting discussion of the age-old build vs. buy conundrum: How to Approach Legal Innovation: Options for Every Firm.

 

  • This is a thought-provoking post: Can Deepfakes Pose a Cybersecurity Threat to Legal? ““Deepfakes are real and emerging as an issue but they, like certain types of technology, could emerge very quickly; we talk about this today and it could be a very big deal in six months or it could be nothing,” Reed Smith’s Stegmaier cautioned. “We simply don’t know.””

 

  • This hour-long podcast is from the Lawyerist: “In this episode with Natalie Worsfold, we talk about her law firm’s approach to law practice, and why more firms aren’t following suit. We start by asking Natalie what problem Counter Tax was trying to solve, then explore how they solved it, what their solution does now, and the plans they have to evolve and grow their solution.”

 

  • This is an idea I have been kicking around for a while. Nick Hilborne gives it the thought I believe it’s due: “Reproduction of the legal profession” at risk from automation. “If junior associates are ‘gradually culled’ from law firms as a result of automation, the entire reproduction of the legal profession could be jeopardised….'” And here’s a US write up of the same issue: Junior Lawyers Are Going Extinct And Nobody Knows What To Do About It.

 

  • AI Goes to Court: A Conversation With Lex Machina and Dorsey & Whitney. Post here.

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

  • The Benefits of the LexisNexis LegalTech Accelerator. Post here.
  • EY and Artificial Lawyer Hold Legal Ops + Technology Event.  Post here.
  • Slaughter and May Names 3rd Fast Forward Cohort, Inc. Blockchain Co. Post here.
  • Meet ATJ Bot – The World’s First Legal Aid Voice Assistant. Post here.
  • How to Build Your Business Case For Contract Management – The Juro Guide. Post here.
  • Oz + NZ Professional Services Startup of the Year Award Launched. Post here.
  • Legal AI Co. CourtQuant Predicts Hard Brexit Impact on British Law. Post here.
  • Christian Lang + Former TR Boss, Tom Glocer, Join Reynen Court. Post here.
  • GCs Keen To Embrace Tech Tools + Legal Ops Skills – Survey. Post here. (Note: This story is based on a survey where n=80. Assuming no other methodological problems [big assumption!], this means that in all of the findings each number is well within the margin of sampling error of the statistics above and below it on the graphs.)
  • Meet Fincap Law: A New Tech-Driven Firm For the New Legal Era. Post here.

 

Posts by Law Firms:

 

 

 

 

 

  • Eric A. Klein and Aytan Dahukey of Sheppard Mullin posted: Day 2 Notes From The 2019 JPMorgan Healthcare Conference. “We are seeing a lot of healthcare entities starting to focus on precision medicine – artificial intelligence suggesting which oncology drug works best for your specific genetic condition and cancer – but that essentially is a transactional function. And the market really wants a partnering function ” Post here.

 

 

 

  • From Reed SmithDraft ethics guidelines for trustworthy artificial intelligence published by the European Commission. Post here.

 

 

  • Akin Gump postedPolicymakers Focused on Artificial Intelligence, Write Akin Gump Lawyers in The Journal of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence & Law.

 

  • Hogan Lovells postedLitigating intellectual property issues: The impact of AI and machine learning.

 

Press Releases and sponsored posts:

  • Here’s a thorough explanation of Gavelytics: Want Better Litigation Outcomes? Know Your Judges. “…(W)ith Gavelytics, you finally get the quantifiable and reliable judge information you need to customize your litigation strategy and increase your chances of winning.”

 

 

  • Gibson Dunn launches AI and automated systems group. Post here.

 

  • The world’s first virtual lawyer, built for Amazon’s Alexa, tests whether lawyers will be replaced by robots. “Australian legal-technology company Smarter Drafter have announced a prototype virtual lawyer, built on Amazon’s Alexa, that creates legal.” documents instantly, just like a real human lawyer. Here’s the Smart Drafter release. Hype much?? And then there’s this: “No date has been set for the release of the first working Alexa integration.”

 

  • HaystackID Acquires eDiscovery Managed Services Provider eTERA, Release here.

 

  • Legal IT Newswire New Product News… Alphaserve Technologies launch Execution as a Service. Post here.

 

  • I’m including this because I used to work there! Am Law 200 Firm Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie Selects Litera Desktop, Litera Microsystems Full Document Drafting Suite.

 

Blockchain

 

 

 

 

  • From the Baker & Hostetler Energy BlogNew Blockchain Products, an FBI Raid, the $11 Billion Bitcoin Case, Hackers Strike With a 51 Percent Attack and Crypto Tax Analysis. Post here.

 

 

  • Here’s a deep dive into the legal services offered by Oath ProtocolThe Lay of the Land in Blockchain Dispute Resolution and Governance Designs.
  • Will an A.I. Ever Become Sentient? “The quest for artificial intelligence could yield something that not only out-thinks humanity but can also feel like us.” Interesting (long) post here.

 

  • Also from Medium: Artificial Intelligence, Consciousness and the Self. This one too is interesting but rather long.

 

  • Capital One AI chief sees path to explainable AI. “Nitzan Mekel-Bobrov, head of artificial intelligence work at card issuer Capital One Financial, disputes the notion deep learning forms of machine learning are “black boxes,” and insists sensitive matters such as decisions to assign credit can be made ‘much more interpretable’.” Story from ZDNet here.

 

  • Uber is getting back into the autonomous vehicle game. Coverage here and here.

 

  • Meanwhile, Kia is looking past vehicle autonomy to reading the driver’s state-of-mind: CES 2019: Kia prepares for post-autonomous driving era with AI-based real-time emotion recognition technology. Coverage here.

 

  • This 45-minute podcast is from   LawNext Episode 23: Dan Rodriguez on Innovating Law and Legal Education.

 

  • Here’s another rather lengthy thought piece from Mark A. CohenLaw Is Lagging Digital Transformation — Why It Matters.

 

  • Google is opening another AI lab, this one at Princeton. Coverage here and here.

 

  • Construction Dive postedThe Dotted Line: Mitigating the risks of technology. “It’s finally happening. Robotics, artificial intelligence, virtual reality and other cutting-edge technology that has empowered a number of industries has undeniably made its way to construction sites. But with new tools come new risks and new ways to manage those risks.”

 

  • Google posted this update. If you’re generally following AI, it’s worth your time. “Six months ago we announced Google’s AI Principles, which guide the ethical development and use of AI in our research and products. As a complement to the Principles, we also posted our Responsible AI Practices, a set of quarterly-updated technical recommendations and results to share with the wider AI ecosystem. Since then we’ve put in place additional initiatives and processes to ensure we live up to the Principles in practice.” The text of the post isn’t what matters here, it’s the several links that provide what I consider best practices.

 

  • Jason Tashea of the ABA Journal postedCalifornia imposes new regulations on ‘internet of things’ devices. “…(M)anufacturers of connected devices will have to include ‘reasonable security’ features to protect stored or transmitted information from ‘unauthorized access, destruction, use, modification or disclosure’.” More coverage of how California’s new data privacy law could change how companies do business in the Golden State here.

 

  • This is also from Jason Tashea at the ABA JournalAccess-to-justice gap? It’s the economy. “In November, the ABA published Formal Opinion 484. From the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility, the opinion approves of some forms of attorney fee financing, believing that they can help close the access-to-justice gap, defined as those who need but can’t attain legal support.”

 

  • This vendor (VerbIT) is new to me. “A VerbIT transcription process starts with an adaptive AI engine that automatically transcribes content at very high accuracy, regardless of subject matter or accent. A sophisticated algorithm distributes each file through 2-layers of human transcribers within seconds, and checks for congruence, localized spelling and other common inaccuracies. The entire process is extremely fast, and yields +99% accuracy.”

 

Law Firm Posts

 

  • From Ropes & GrayPodcast: Artificial Intelligence and Intellectual Property Considerations. Sixteen-minute discussion of AI-driven technologies here.

 

 

  • How Fenwick Labs‘ Growth Is a Microcosm of Legal Tech’s Evolution. Post here.

 

 

 

  • This, is from Bruce Stachenfeld of Duval & Stachenfeld: Artificial Intelligence: Is It Really A Threat To Us Lawyers? “(S)omeday AI may have an impact on our profession that is more than automating drudge business, but in my view not yet, and not for a long while.”

 

  • Stewart A. Baker of Steptoe & Johnson LLP postedThe Cyberlaw Law Podcast: Blockchain Takes Over The Podcast. It’s a summary of this hour-long podcast.

 

 

  • Today’s release of the 2018 Blickstein Group Law Department Operations Survey Report reveals law departments are taking advantage of #newlaw options. Post here. I would evaluate the survey’s methodology, but to download the report one must agree to “you are opting in to receive Above the Law Sponsored Messages,” and I won’t.

 

Press Releases/Vendor Articles

  • Seal Software releases most comprehensive contract analytics platform for banks and financial services firms. Release here.

 

 

  • DFIN Elevates Artificial Intelligence Platform with Acquisition of eBrevia. Post here.

 

  • Ascertus Limited has achieved over 100% business growth in 2018, including head count and revenue. This growth has come equally from existing client retention and new business, which has been driven primarily by increasing interest in iManage Work cloud deployments as well as BusyLamp legal spend management implementations.” Post here.

 

  • Dean Sonderegger of Wolters Kluwer posted: New Year’s Resolutions For Legal Tech. “We’ve covered several different use cases for AI in this column — and while the technology holds tremendous potential, we know that there’s no silver bullet or one-size-fits-all solution for everyone and every challenge. As we continue to see new offerings enter the market, the professionals who have a clear understanding of their business will ultimately be successful in unlocking the value of these tools and driving innovation within their organizations.”

 

From Artificial Lawyer

  • The eBrevia/Donnelley Merger, Start of A Legal AI Consolidation Wave? Post here.

 

  • This is a guest post by Michael Burne, Founder and CEO, Carbon Law PartnersA New Year’s Evolution: Is the Traditional Law Firm Model Finished…? “Are traditional firms a busted flush? Well, if by traditional we mean ‘unwaveringly wedded to a construct in the face of rapid change’ – then yes. If we mean ‘a broad adherence to values and a purpose driven organisation’ – then no.”

 

  • 2019 Legal Tech Predictions from the Market. Post here. Leaders of vendors are a few law firms make their predictions.

 

  • This look back is especially blockchain-focused. Christmas News Stocking from Artificial Lawyer.

 

  • Artificial Lawyer Year in Review – 2018 – What a Year! Post here.

 

Blockchain

  • This is a good, brief overview by Thomson Reuters Legal: Blockchain and Its Implications within Legal.

 

  • “The European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) announced Tuesday that it has launched a new industry specification group for blockchain.” Post here.

 

  • “Earlier this month, Malta held its blockchain conferenceDELTA Summit, attracting more than 3,500 industry experts and government officials. The Summit operates as a platform for investors and experts to share their experience and opinions, specifically on the controversially debated issue of regulation, with fellow entrepreneurs and investors of all ages.” LOTS of topics are covered in this post.

 

AI and Blockchain Prognostications and Looking Back (also see Artificial Lawyer above)

  • From Health IT SecurityBlockchain, HIPAA Regulation Lead Top 10 Stories of 2018. “(T)o get a sense of the topics that matter most to executive and clinical leadership, HealthITSecurity.com compiled the top stories from 2018. Here are the most read stories of 2019, leading down to the most popular article.”

 

  • This, from Medium: 2018 in Review: 10 AI Failures. Several are law-related.

 

  • Team Ripple posted this rather technical look back: 2018: The Year of Breakthroughs in Blockchain.

 

  • From iappTop 10 Privacy Perspectives of 2018.

 

  • The Big Four’s Big Year: Expansion, Immigration and Evaluation. “Deloitte, KPMG, EY and PwC all made moves in 2018 aimed at building their law practices.” You really should read this summary. It includes coverage of law firms hiring from the Big 4!

 

  • This is by Frank Ready of ALM: Blockchain Made Big Strides in the Legal Services Market During 2018.

 

  • Market intelligence firm Tractica posted: Artificial Intelligence Deployments Have Expanded to Include 258 Unique Use Cases Across Enterprise, Consumer, and Government Markets. “Annual Artificial Intelligence Software Revenue Will Total $8.1 Billion Worldwide in 2018.”

 

  • This commentary is from Information WeekPredictions for Artificial Intelligence in 2019. I found these especially interesting.

 

  • 5 Legal Tech Trends to Watch in 2019. This post is from Sysero.

 

  • From Rachel WolfsonBlockchain And Crypto Leaders Share Their 2019 Industry Predictions. This post isn’t very long and it’s quite interesting.

 

  • This one is from ComputerWorldBlockchain in 2019 and beyond: 5 predictions. “After a year where cryptocurrencies lost 80% of their value, and the hype around blockchain as a panacea for business transaction problems has cooled, 2019 will be a year of building real-world solutions.”

 

  • Crypterium posted this look ahead: 4 Major Blockchain Trends to Watch for in 2019. It’s short and straightforward.

 

  • IBM Artificial Intelligence Chief Shares His Predictions For 2019. 4-minute video here. Interesting thoughts re progress toward General AI.

 

  • Wow. This tool sounds like a serious way for in-house counsel to leverage AI to better choose outside counsel. There’s No Such Thing As A Competitive Legal Market — But There Are Ways To Make It Better. “Bodhala’s legal analytics offer in-house counsel a wealth of information about the entire Am Law 200, high-quality boutiques, as well as a number of local firms that clients can easily customize to find exactly what they want. The platform also leverages machine learning technology to make predictive calls about opportunities to lower costs with other firms. Beyond talent procurement, the product offers spend optimization features that grant clients an opportunity to really market test quotes for legal services.” Press release here.

 

  • From Gerry Riskin: Next Step in Law-Firm AI Implementation? Getting the Lawyers on Board. “Even at DLA Piper, one of the major users of legal technology (such as the contract and document analysis programs available through Kira Systems), Director of Innovation Adam Hembury estimates that his firm is using only one percent of the overall potential AI support currently available to its lawyers.”

 

  • From WombleInnovation in construction and law: unlocking new value. “To address this, law firms are exploring the use of: Artificial Intelligence (AI) powered tools that provide machine learning capabilities. These are being widely adopted by the legal profession and over the next few decades software systems such as that provided by Kira Systems will apply machine-learning techniques to many of the routine tasks presently undertaken by lawyers, in a way which improves accuracy and limits risk. …”

 

  • State Bar of Michigan On Balance podcast: NEXT Conference 2018: Artificial Intelligence, Ethics, and Automation. “Nicole Black talks about artificial intelligence and other legal technology.” “She shares tips for automating your practice, with and without AI, and ethics advice to keep in mind when using the cloud and social media.” Here’s a link to the 13-minute podcast.

 

  • Must you disclose what your bot is up to? California weighs in on AI. “The California Legislature recently tackled this issue and the dilemma between the legitimate and productive use of ‘bots’ and the misleading and often socially disruptive use of this technology. In Senate Bill 1001, which was signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Sept. 28, the Legislature took the approach of requiring disclosure when a company or a political advocacy group is using a ‘bot’ to communicate with people. The operative language of the law is it is illegal for ‘any person to use a bot to communicate or interact with another person in California online …. to incentivize a purchase or sale of goods or services in a commercial transaction or to influence a vote in an election.'” The post is by Glen W. Price of Best Best & Krieger.

 

  • This, from EntreprenuerWhy Big-Name Investors Like Mark Cuban Are Disrupting the Legal Profession. “It does not seem an obvious or exciting industry for big-name investors. But, some of the most famous entrepreneurs — now including billionaire Mark Cuban — are putting their money into disrupting the legal profession.”

 

  • Five9 Aims To Unlock Insight From Contact Center With Artificial Intelligence. “Five9 has offered new AI features, such as the Five9 Genius, that delivers contextual and intelligent routing using unstructured data from emails, chats and other data channels to derive customer intent. It includes real-time natural language processing, business rules, and open AI connectors to create more intelligent routing and agent guidance.” Much more here.

 

  • The objectives of this video from Law Technology Today are:
    • Learn practical tips on how to bring innovation to legal services
    • Discover the key elements of innovation initiatives
    • Hear best practices in the evaluation, deployment, and adoption of technology
    • Understand the building blocks necessary to be successful

It features Jim Lupo of Northwestern Law, Tariq Abdullah of Walmart, and Wendy Curits and Daryl Shetterly from Orrick.

 

  • Press releaseCorporate Counsels and Contract Management: A Guide to Making the Case for Technology. “Exigent’s new guide, Corporate Counsels and Contract Management: A Guide to Making the Case for Technology, dives deeper into the ins and outs of legal technology. It provides some key questions to ask to identify the right solution for your business, including: What are your security needs? What functionality is and isn’t necessary? How much training will members of your organization need to use the new technology?”

 

  • This, from contractworks: An Introductory Guide to Contract Risk Assessment. “How to analyze, measure, and score your contract terms to identify risks, maintain compliance, and improve operational oversight.”

 

  • Artificial Intelligence – A Counterintelligence Perspective: Part IV by Jim Baker: “Instead, in keeping with the counterintelligence focus of this series, I want to discuss two important baskets of implications and risks related to XAI (explainable AI) and ethical AI:  (1) effective management of certain operational, privacy and reputational risks; and (2) adversaries’ use of black-box AI.” Post here.

 

  • Teaching Technology Today: One Law School’s Innovative Offerings. “Lawyers of the future, regardless of practice area, need to be proficient in legal technology.” Here’s what Hofstra Law’s doing about it. Check out the courses!

 

  • What’s Artificial About Ethical AI In The Legal Industry? Everything. “Lawyers are trained and have studied ethics. They must be utilized to succeed in creating ethical AI programs.” Here’s the post by Andy Neill of HighQ.

 

  • Lisa Morgan interviewed Joe Lynyak of Dorsey & Whitney and other experts for this postPrivacy Compliance May Get Tougher Soon. “Organizations have had a tough time trying to comply with the European Union’s GDPR and now they have to consider the potential effect of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).”

 

  • Calif. Looking to Tech to Increase Access to Justice. “How technology can increase access to justice while protecting the public is the focus of a newly appointed California Bar task force. The question is how the legal services industry can integrate new tech to become more efficient and responsive while avoiding ethical roadblocks against fee-sharing with non-lawyers and other arrangements.”

 

  • This, from Freshfields: People Analytics: The Opportunities and Legal Risks of a Brave New World. “Advances in technology and artificial intelligence are allowing companies to solve strategic issues in ever quicker, more innovative ways. These advances are just as applicable to people management. People Analytics is the application of digital tools and algorithms to data about or relating to people, including through profiling. The data that is collected, processed and interpreted by People Analytics tools can allow employers to make better HR decisions and run their businesses more efficiently through cost reductions and enhanced operational capabilities. In our briefing we discuss the benefits, the challenges and the legal risks associated with the use of People Analytics.”

 

  • Frances Wilding and James Ward of Haseltine Lake postedUK: Updated Guidelines For Examination At The EPO In Force 1 November 2018. “In the 2018 Guidelines, a group of sections relating to CII have been significantly revised and newly added: … New section added about the field of artificial intelligence and machine learning, aimed at better defining the criteria for their patentability (G II, 3.3.1).”

 

  • This, from Craig W. Adas and Alex Purtill of Weil Gotshal: Valuation Issues in Acquiring Artificial Intelligence Companies.

 

  • “Further, regarding emerging technology, 68% of solos and 72% of lawyers in firms with 2-9 attorneys report it is “very” or “somewhat” important to receive training and education on emerging technology like blockchain and artificial intelligence.” More from the annual ABA Legal Technology Survey Report here. (It’s huge.)

 

  • From Gwynne MonahanFalling for Legal Technology Recent updates and releases. “…(L)egal technology product updates and release announcements over the past month.” Just in case I missed something.

 

  • Press release: “Consilio, a global leader in eDiscoverydocument reviewrisk management, and legal consulting services, has announced it has acquired DiscoverReady, a premier eDiscovery, document review, and compliance solutions provider. The combined company will operate more than 70 offices, review centers, and data centers around the world in 11 countries. The company’s global operations will continue to serve investigation, litigation, and compliance matters of all sizes and complexities, anywhere in the world.:

 

  • Lawyers safe from brave new AI world… for now. “James Kwan, partner at Hogan Lovells, said there are ‘few laws’ that explicitly ban robots from being decision makers. He alluded to the Code of Civil Procedure in France, which makes references to arbitral decisions being made by a ‘person’, as one that does appear to reject the prospect. ‘Other laws may have implicitly excluded the possibility,’ he added. However, Kwan referenced proposals going through the European Parliament that would afford ‘legal status’ to robots and ensure that highly capable AI have recognised rights and responsibilities. ‘It’s amazing that we have even got to the point where we can have a discussion on this,’ Kwan said, adding: ‘I think lawyers are safe for the time being’.” Story here.

 

  • This, from Bernard MarrHow The UK Government Uses Artificial Intelligence To Identify Welfare And State Benefits Fraud. “Investment in data strategy, technologies that support machine learning and artificial intelligence, and hiring skilled data professionals is a top priority for the UK government. Ministers of the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) have rolled out and tested AI to automate claims processing and fight fraud within their department.”

 

  • Criminal justice system ‘really creaking’, warns outgoing CPS chief. “She would also see how technology can be improved to support everyone’s roles: ‘Digital forensics offer us valuable evidence in cases, but at the moment they simply take too long. And everything from faster Wi-Fi connections in court to the use of Artificial Intelligence could make everyone’s roles easier and the system faster and more effective for victims, witnesses and defendants.'” Story here.

 

  • “Charles Ciumei QC of Essex Court Chambers in London said the use of prediction tools “to assist human judicial decision making” was more achievable than “robot judges”.” Post here.

 

  • This, from Shanti Berggren of Optus Legal: Law, the digital age and change to come. “It is technology that facilitates our Optus Legal Team operating nationally allowing some of our lawyers to live and work away from our Sydney headquarters. In short, technology is changing legal culture and what it means to be a lawyer. But how should that change be managed?” The story has some answers.

 

  • Press release: Dentons Rodyk will use XION.AI’s deep learning bots as part of its wider technology initiative designed to enhance productivity and further innovate its legal service offerings in the region. It is part of the firm’s strategy to leverage on technology to optimise legal services for its clients.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:
    • AL Caffeine, Feat: Relativity, QDiscovery, Taylor Wessing, TLT, Luminance + AI Art. Post.
    • TL, DR: The 14 Key Lessons From Juro’s Legal Operations eBook. Post.

 

  • Not AI, but pretty cool tech: (New Zealand’s) TMJAM launches real time IPONZ trade-mark filings. “New law tech company TMJAM disrupts traditional intellectual property lawyering with an advanced platform allowing the public to file their own trade mark applications online.” Story here.

 

  • EPIC calls for US adoption of AI guidelines. “In its letter to the NSF, EPIC argues the principles match up well with AI strategies already laid out by the U.S. “By investing in AI systems that strive to meet the [universal] principles, NSF can promote the development of systems that are accurate, transparent, and accountable from the outset,” EPIC President and Executive Director Marc Rotenberg writes.” Full story here.

 

Blockchain

  • Here’s a collection of TED talks about blockchain.
  • I can’t wait to see a demo of this. Neota Partners With Legal Consultants for AI-Based Billing Tool. “Neota Logic and legal pricing consultants Burcher Jennings and Validatum teamed up to launch Virtual Pricing Director, a collaboration years in the making.”

 

  • Here’s more news from Neota Logic: Legal tech education: Neota partners with three new universities. “Neota Logic will today (19 October) announce three new education partnerships, with The University of Limerick, Ulster University and London South Bank University, which has launched a new law and technology option for students. Over the course of a semester, students at these schools will learn how to design, build and test digital legal solutions that solve a specific access to justice problem.”

 

  • Slaughter and May expands scope of its technology entrepreneurs programme. “The first two cohorts of the programme, originally named Fintech Fast Forward, focussed on UK-based start-up and high growth companies operating in the fintech sector, including paymentstech, insurtech, regtech, data analytics and AI. Under its new name, Fast Forward, the programme will be expanded to cover young companies operating in a diverse range of emerging technology sectors including IOT, cryptography, cyber, robotics, machine learning and DLT, as well as fintech.” More here.

 

  • Corrs postedAlong for the Ride: Considering the Legal and Practical Consequences of Self-Driving Vehicles. “If you’re over seven years of age – and have completed an online registration process – you can be part of Australia’s first Automated Vehicle Trial, by taking a ride on the Royal Automobile Club of Western Australia (RAC) Intellibus, a fully automated, electric shuttle bus launched on public roads with the support of the WA State Government and the City of South Perth.”

 

  • Gavelytics Partners with CourtCall, Expanding Judicial Analytics to New States, Markets. “Remote court appearance provider CourtCall will offer a ‘simplified version’ of Gavelytics judicial analysis as it expands to Florida, Texas and California.” Details here.

 

  • From LittlerWhat Construction Attorneys Need To Know About AI. (Subscription required.)

 

  • This post isn’t as “legal” as the title might suggest, but it’s an interesting consideration. Artificial intelligence — Who is responsible for the outcomes?

 

  • Thomson Hine postedDepartment of the Treasury Releases Interim Rules Expanding Scope of CFIUS and Creating Pilot Program for Certain Transactions. “While the text of ECRA does not define the term “emerging and foundational technologies,” the following industry sectors could be included: artificial intelligence….”

 

  • Neil Rose postedNew tech demands code of “cyber ethics” for lawyers.

 

  • More from the Mintz seriesStrategies to Unlock AI’s Potential in Health Care, Part 2: FDA’s Approach to Protecting Patients & Promoting Innovation. “Artificial intelligence—AI—is the future of everything. But when patient health is on the line, can we trust algorithms to make decisions instead of patients or their health care providers? This post, the second in our blog series about AI in health care, explores FDA’s proposed regulatory model that is supposed to be better suited for AI (and similar technologies) while still protecting patients.”

 

  • This from HR Daily Advisor: “Like it or not, it’s time to prepare your employees for the fourth industrial revolution, where automated technologies and artificial intelligence are becoming mainstream. Below is more information about what you can do to accomplish this as an L&D professional.”

 

  • From WombleA.I. in the TCPA Crosshairs: TCPA Class Action Challenges Hotel’s Use of IVY Concierge Artificial Intelligence SMS Platform.

 

  • This from the International Association of Privacy Professionals: Perspective: Should robots have rights? “(California) Bill 1001 implicates a hitherto-abstract, philosophical debate about when a simulation of intelligence crosses the line into sentience and becomes a true artificial intelligence.”

 

  • This 5-minute podcast is from Shook Hardy: Can Robots Be Sued? Q&A With Cory Fisher.

 

  • Fully digital conclusion of contracts via Alexa becomes possible for clients of insurtech firm Deutsche Familienversicherung. “Customers can now not only receive advice from Alexa, but can also simultaneously conclude an insurance contract within only a few seconds.” Story here.

 

  • At least in the UK: “There may need to be some coverage disputes before professional indemnity (PI) insurers work out how to deal with bad advice given by artificial intelligence (AI) systems used by lawyers, a leading City firm has warned. It said the widespread use of technology that utilised AI ‘contributes to additional complexity and uncertainty for insureds and insurers when assessing risk and apportioning liability’. More here.

 

  • From Legal Futures: Law firms look to leverage data in battle with new providers. “Law firms big and small are increasingly viewing artificial intelligence (AI) software and particularly the exploitation of data as integral to business health, a survey has found. The annual law firm benchmarking survey by accountancy and consultancy firm Crowe, also found a growing fear of non-lawyer legal services providers, especially among City firms.” I could not find the survey methodology, so let the reader beware.

 

  • “Above the Law and Thomson Reuters present Big Data and the Litigation Analytics Revolution, the fourth and final installment of our Law2020 series, a multimedia exploration of how artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge technologies are reshaping the practice and profession of law.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:
    • “Global legal tech company, Thomson Reuters (TR), has partnered with contracting automation platform Synergist.io, in a move that will see the Germany-based startup integrate with the well-known Contract Express document automation system.” Story here.
    • We Are All Lawyers Now – The Rise of the Legalish. Interesting perspective here.
    • Language and Machine Learning – A Lawyer’s Guide. Post by Johannes Stiehler, CTO, of text analytics company Ayfie
    • More A2J news! California Starts Special Task Force on A2J Tech, Legal AI Founder Joins.

 

Blockchain

  • China’s Internet Censor Releases Draft Regulation for Blockchain Startups. ” The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) published a draft policy on Friday, called “The Regulation for Managing Blockchain Information Services” and is now looking for public feedback before it will take effect.” Story here.

 

 

  • What Carl Sagan has to do with regulating blockchain smart contracts. “If policymakers seem flummoxed by the rise of cryptocurrencies, wait until they get to smart contracts. Just ask Brian Quintenz, commissioner for the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission. At a conference in Dubai this week, Quintenz expressed a sense of awe at the vast unknown that blockchain-based computer programs have created for his agency. “Post here.

 

  • Blockchain developments in Nashville:
    • “Stakeholders in the creation, growth and connectedness of blockchain- or distributed ledger-enabled jobs and wealth creation in Tennessee gathered twice within the past 24 hours with representatives of Tennessee Economic and Community Development (ECD) to explore the technology’s status, the state’s competitive assets and its potential strategic options.” “A nonprofit organization is to be formed to support the collaborative’s aims, according to Waller Lansden attorney Kristen Johns, who is the prime mover in this emerging initiative. Waller cosponsored the event with Brooklyn-based Consensys, a distributed-ledger-oriented tech company.” More here.
    • And check out Tokenize Tennessee here.

 

  • From Goulston & Storrs‘ Retail Law Advisor,  penned Augmented Retail – The Use of Artificial Intelligence and Augmented Reality to Enhance the Customer Shopping Experience. The use of these technologies by Amazon, American Apparel, Ikea, Williams Sonoma and Sephora are discussed.

 

  • Standardization of legaltech, what a concept!! “…12 law firms (including LathamClifford ChancePaul WeissCravath, Freshfields, Linklaters and Skadden) have joined a consortium to support a legal tech startup called Reynen Court LLC, which is creating a platform to allow law firms to more quickly deploy legal tech tools such as contract analysis, discovery and practice management. In short, the effort is akin to creating an App Store that will allow law firms to quickly and more securely fire up third-party software.” These Big Law Firms Are Backing an App Store for Legal Tech Products. Coverage of this development here and here.

 

  • From Allen MatkinsKeith Paul BishopIs Artificial Intelligence The Future Of Rulemaking? “I can foresee a time when artificial intelligence is used to identify agency rulemaking proposals and to craft comments.  Agencies may in turn use artificial intelligence to categorize, analyze and even respond to comments.  In this dystopian future, regulations may be entirely drafted, commented on and promulgated by computers.”

 

 

  • This post is from Covington’s Inside Privacy blog: IoT and AI Update: California Legislature Passes Bills on Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, and Chatbots. The post describes the law’s provisions.

 

  • Here’s the story of Keystone Law from it’s founding in 2002 as a different kind of law firm to the decision to float on the London Stock Exchange. AI and blockchain are mentioned.

 

  • Included in this critique of the Legal Services Act (Tensions in Legal Services Act coming to fore, says review by Neil Rose), “The current structure therefore pre-dates the global financial crisis (which has led to austerity, shortfalls in the funding of legal aid and the wider courts and justice system, and then to a rise in litigants-in-person). It also pre-dates a use of technology that has become more extensive and pervasive, as well as the rise of artificial intelligence in law.”

 

  • Here’s Part Three of Squire Patton Boggs’ Artificial Intelligence Law Is Here by Huu Nguyen. “Our discussion of AI Law turns now to the topic of robo-advisors, AI speech and AI legislations before Congress.” It includes reviews of and links to the first two parts. “it is clear that AI Law is here, and here to stay. The advice I can give to the law or computer science student today in this fast changing arena is to be part of the debate of where AI Law should be and not just focus on the technology.”

 

  • This, from Legal FuturesFrom lawyer marketplace to global law firm? “An online lawyer-matching business (Lexoo) targeted at companies has secured £3.4m in its latest funding round with an investor predicting that it could become ‘a virtual and distributed tech-driven global law firm’. Lexoo will use the funding to invest in new technology, including automated contract drafting and project management tools to further increase efficiencies of its lawyers.”

 

  • “The Solicitors Regulation Authority has been awarded £700,000 in taxpayers’ money to support innovations involving artificial intelligence to transform the legal services market for small businesses and consumers.” “According to the department, the SRA’s project, Data-Driven Innovation in Legal Services, ’will seek out and accelerate ethical AI-powered business innovations that support its regulatory objectives. The focus will be on growing the large underdeveloped legal services market for small businesses and consumers, where AI and automation can have a transformative impact’.” More from The Law Society Gazette here.

 

  • From Darren Hau of Marks & Clerk: Patenting AI: the EPO’s new guidelines: “In its annual update of the “Guidelines for Examination”, the European Patent Office (EPO) has provided further guidance for its examiners in relation to the patentability of inventions relating to mathematical methods and computer programs. This updated guidance is of particular relevance to inventions relating to the fast-growing field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). In part 1 of this article, we provide a summary of the key points from the updated guidelines that are relevant to AI inventions. Part 2 will follow, in which we will provide an in-depth assessment of the impact of the new guidelines on the patentability of AI inventions.”

 

  • “The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) will hold its annual Legal Issues Forum with the 2018 theme Legal and Ethical Issues of Artificial Intelligence, from 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, October 16, 2018, at the FHI 360 Conference Center, 1825 Connecticut Avenue, NW, in Washington, DC.” Details here.

 

  • Since the release of Westlaw Edge, Thomson Reuters has been on an AI publishing tear. Some of the material is by their own folks and some by third parties touting the advantages of Thomson’s approach or their specific products. Here‘s another: Artificial Intelligence: The Debate Between Point and Platform Solutions by Sally Gonzalez.

 

Here are the latest headlines from Artificial Lawyer:

  • Legal Tech Leaders: Sam Moore, Innovation Manager, Burness Paull. Story here.
  • Meet LegalForce, Japan’s First Ever Legal AI Platform. Story here.
  • SRA Targets Legal AI A2J Applications with ‘Innovate Testbed’. Story here.

 

Blockchain

  • How Can Blockchain Thrive In The Face Of European GDPR Blockade? “In an almost direct clash of intentions, the GDPR has effectively banned the use of blockchain technology in Europe because of its immutable nature. The GDPR offers the power back to the individual to edit and delete data which falls into the hands of centralized authorities, but when there is no centralized authority, there is no need for data to be moved around. This is the crux of the GDPR’s clash with blockchain. So, what happens to Europe and the next technological wave?” The post by Darryn Pollockdescribes the situation in some detail and says the regulations should change, but does not offer specific suggestions.

 

  • Here’s a brief summary of the second and the final day of Ripple’s Swell conference, including a link to this 20-page report. (“Conducted in August of 2018, the Blockchain in Payments Report analyzed data from 676 respondents across 22 countries who are directly involved with payment services at their organization.” There is no mention of the response rate of other methodology. Assuming no problems there, 676 responses should support robust analysis.)

 

  • From Anastasios Antoniou of the Oxford Faculty of Law: Bridging the divide between code and law in distributed ledger ecosystems. “Code and law have been entangled in a silent tension ever since the advent of cyberspace.  The centralised architecture of cyberspace paved the way for law to prevail.  The latest manifestation of this tension, however, appears to be opening up a Pandora’s box.  Blockchain and law are on a silent collision course that must be addressed. This post argues that in bridging the divide between code and law in blockchain, a radical rethink of regulation is imperative.”
  • In this post, Jordan Furlong discusses the future of law librarians as impacted by technologies such as AI and as roles evolve into more focus on Competitive Intelligence (here, called Market Intelligence). This article by Jordan is referenced.

 

  • Press releaseGridlogics Launches PatSeer 360™ – IP Strategy Takes a Quantum Leap with Introduction of This Disruptive New IP Intelligence Platform. “PatSeer 360™ correlates patent data with business and legal data points to give you insights for refining your IP protection, management and commercialization strategies. The solution combines Artificial Intelligence, Big Data and immersive visualizations in a versatile and easy to use platform that requires minimum learning curve.”

 

  • From Canadian UnderwriterManaging your client’s M&A risk with A.I. “Lawyers are using machine learning – a type of artificial intelligence in which computer software does something without being explicitly programmed to do so – to identify potential liabilities in contracts. AI lets computer programs learn from experience and identify patterns, Strategy Meets Action notes.”

 

  • From Canadian Lawyer: Critical topics facing the legal community. “The topic of technology continues to dominate the minds of leadership in the legal community. Whether it’s artificial intelligence, whether it’s how you manage the overall data research client information, I think technology is overwhelming for a lot of firms.”

 

  • Richard Burnham, solicitor and co-founder of Eallium CMS, posted: The ethics of lawtech. “For now, lawtech is simply a wide-ranging label that describes technology created with a view to reducing law firm overheads and/or increasing the availability of access to justice. You typically see it deployed within case management systems, document analysis algorithms, case outcome predictors, and chat bots designed to provide interim legal advice to consumers. The ethical conundrums of lawtech are many, sprouting mostly from its complexity.”

 

  • In this podcast, Bob Ambrogi interviews Rick Merrill of Gavelytics to discuss “the product one year after its launch, how lawyers use analytics for strategic and competitive purposes, and how analytics and AI are being used more broadly in law.” LawNext Episode 12: Judging Judges – How Gavelytics’ Judicial Analytics are Reshaping Litigation.

 

  • In Japan, artificial intelligence enters the legal field. “Artificial intelligence has moved into the world of corporate legal matters: A Tokyo-based start-up founded by young lawyers is using AI to check for omissions and mistakes in contracts, sometimes taking only one second.” “LegalForce Inc. was established in April last year, and is led by 31-year-old lawyer Nozomu Tsunoda, who quit a leading law firm to go into business for himself. Even with only seven employees, LegalForce checks contract documents such as a confidentiality agreement between companies.” Coverage here.

 

  • Here’s an interesting article discussing the legal rights of self-aware entities. Apes, dolphins, AI??

 

  • Two posts from Kemp IT Law in as many days! Here‘s a video titled What does the future hold for AI and product liability? “Liability will see extensive AI-influenced legal developments, especially in the areas of autonomous vehicles, robots and other ‘mobile’ autonomous systems.”

 

  • From Osborne ClarkeHave your say | How should competition law apply to the digital economy? “…(O)ther questions look at challenges which are specific to digital markets or new technology, such as: the impact on competition of ownership of big data by a small number of big firms; the impact on competition and cartel enforcement of artificial intelligence and machine learning; and how to deal with mergers and takeovers in digital markets.”

 

  • “Burford Capital Ltd. raised $250 million this week by selling new shares on the London Stock Exchange, the publicly traded litigation finance company announced Tuesday.” “The London-based litigation financier, which had a market cap of $5.4 billion as of Monday, said a debt issue and a private fund raise would follow “shortly.”” Coverage here.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:

– UK Takes Another Step Toward Blockchain Property Register with R3. Story here.

The Launch of the Manchester LegalTech Consortium – (…which Is Now to Be Called the ‘Manchester Law & Technology Initiative’.). Story here.

– Legal AI Platformisation Continues with Diligen/QRX Data Partnership. Story here.

– Legal AI Co. Luminance Goes After The eDiscovery Market. Story here.

– Declare Your Legal Bot! New California Law Demands Bot Transparency. Story here.

 

Blockchain

  • Bullish on Blockchain, Young Phila. Lawyer Launches Boutique. Bull Blockchain Law. “His client base includes various technology industry players with some connection to blockchain technology, he said. They’re using the technology for matters in real estate, data storage, supply chain management, and even gaming. Smart contracts are the most popular business application of blockchain technology, he said. Bull said he’s already in talks with other attorneys about joining the firm, with the goal of ultimately organizing the firm into various departments for different industries.” Industry focus; smart!! Details here.

 

  • This post (Bill Clinton: ‘Permutations and Possibilities of Blockchain are Staggeringly Great’) summarizes an interview with Clinton following his keynote address at Ripple’s annual Swell conference in San Francisco on October 1. “While Clinton acknowledged the potential of disruptive technologies like blockchain, the former president urged that economic and social policy ‘work better as positive sum games.'”

 

  • From DentonsPractical application of distributed ledger technology: Maintaining corporate records on the blockchain. “…(B)usinesses may want to explore implementing DLT (Distributed ledger technology)-based platforms; we believe they can increase efficiency, accuracy, transparency and security in record management and finance while minimizing cost, providing significant competitive advantages to companies that adopt this technology.”
  • It’s easy to make long term predictions, largely because it’s so rare for anyone to go back and see how you did. In this post, (The Long View of Legal Innovation) Ron Friedmann goes back 15 years to take a look at his own prognostications. Some of it was pretty obvious (“change management remains a hard problem to solve: many lawyers resist new ways of working”), but I believe the basics of his Federalism & Foundations “grant” model was/is interesting and holds up. Not bad!

 

  • With AI, it’s all about the data. I expect the data in almost every firm’s matter intake system could be improved by both doing less and doing more. It’s time for some serious process engineering! This article by  takes a look at some of these issues.

 

  • From DLA Piper’s IPT Italy BlogPrisca, the DLA Piper chatbot that will become your personal assistant. “We are thrilled to announce the launch of Prisca, DLA Piper chatbot that will be able to answer data protection law questions and intellectual property questions on trade secrets. Prisca is an artificial intelligence system based on IBM Watson technology that can help you to find the information you need about the GDPR and trade secrets, their provisions, definitions and what you should do to be compliant.”

 

  • Speaking of Italy, this is from Dentons Italy. Rise of the machines: could the increasing use of technology lead to a four-day working week for all? “Frances O’Grady, the TUC’s general secretary, said: ‘Bosses and shareholders must not be allowed to sweep up all the gains from new tech for themselves. Working people deserve their fair share and that means using the gains from new tech to raise pay and allow more time with their families.'”

 

  • From Kelly Twigger via Above the Law: Why Review Is Much Harder Than You Think. “…(D)o we really need all of this linear review?  Is it worth the money? Review is essential — no question. But what you review needs careful consideration and it should almost always be a small subset of what you’ve collected. To get to that subset takes thoughtful preparation and time, together with input from the client, consideration of the case strategy and your obligations.”

 

  • MoFo postBig Data and AI: “The Algorithm Did It” Defense Will Not Fly in Court.

 

  • Also from MoFo, these brief observations: Artificial Intelligence vs. Emotional Intelligence. (The post’s title sounds promising, but the content doesn’t really deliver.)

 

  • Senators introduce the ‘Artificial Intelligence in Government Act’ “Per a news release, the bill would seek to “improve the use of AI across the federal government by providing resources and directing federal agencies to include AI in data-related planning.” Details here and here.

 

  • This, from  of EffortlessLegal: Top Five Reasons Why Outdated Technology May Be Hindering Your Firm’s Potential. “Even if your legal services are the best available, not measuring up when it comes to technology will give the perception that you are slow, outdated, or otherwise not qualified to handle the client’s legal matter.”

 

  • Law firms join forces with university in lawtech initiative. “The University of Manchester will bring together an interdisciplinary academic team from its schools of law, business and computer science, to form a consortium with City giant Freshfields Brukhaus Deringer and DWF Ventures, the national law firm’s research and development arm. The consortium is the first research collaboration of its type in the UK to draw on business and academic expertise to develop research and teaching focused on the potential application and the impact of digital technology in legal services provision.” More here.

 

  • This post is from Stephen Beney and Reshika Dhir of Bereskin & Parr Inventorship in the Age of AI. “(T)he pervasive use of AI has given rise to a very interesting legal question of who should be considered the true inventor(s) of AI-generated inventions.”

 

  • This article features Ari Kaplan’s interview of Anthony W. Crowell, the Dean and President of New York Law School regarding the newly launched Business of Law Institute. “The Business of Law Institute is going to start with a series of programs that tap into our alumni and other experts, who will teach master classes that give an in-depth review of different areas, including data privacy, artificial intelligence, blockchain, and other pressing issues.”

 

  • Here’s a detailed look at the PwC/Fragomen hookup: The PwC / Fragomen Alliance Unpacked: A Peek Inside The Big Four’s Legal Market Playbook.

 

  • From Kemp IT LawLegal Aspects of Artificial Intelligence (v2.0). It’s a 47-page white paper on the subject.

 

  • It seems I’ve fallen behind re the always-interesting posts from the UK’s Artificial Lawyer. Here are some recent headlines:

– O Silo Mio! – LegalTech Silos Are On The Rise, and That’s Bad. Story here.

AI Doc Review Co. Evisort Partners with LSI Translator. Story here.

– Smart Contract Org. Accord Bags Clifford Chance + More. Story here.

– 5 Questions Lawyers Should Ask About AI. Story here.

– BCLP Launches New Post-Integration Global Innovation Group. Story here.

– Legal Tech Popcorn, Feat: ContractPodAi, HSF, OpenLaw + vLex. Story here.

– Demystifying AI For Lawyers: Supervised Machine Learning. Story here.

 

Blockchain

  • Araa Group of Advocates and Legal Consultants has become Dubai’s first blockchain based law firm after signing a collaborative partnership with e-Mal. Here’s the press release. “By signing the partnership with Araa, e-Mal will bring more efficiency and uniformity in contracting like done by OpenLaw, ContractCode, Integra Ledger within the Legal Industry. By introducing the blockchain based platform, legal documents within the chain will now be a ‘single source of truth’ within the legal blockchain.”

 

  • From India’s AMLegalsIs Your Contract Safe and Healthy? The post offers a bit of a contract check-up via a series of questions.

 

  • Walmart to salad growers: If you want to sell, you have to blockchain. Full story here.

 

  • Shearman & Sterling post: Gaps in Current Legal Framework Hindering Blockchain-based Trade Finance. “…(W)hile it has become technologically possible to execute transactions using negotiable instruments registered via blockchain technology, existing U.S. law recognizes negotiable instruments only if they are on paper and signed, which hinders the advancement of blockchain-based trade finance.”

 

  • Hogan Lovells postedNational Science Foundation Seeks Comments on Artificial Intelligence, Continuing Policy Makers’ Focus on AI.

 

  • Perkins Coie is the latest to join the Accord Project. Here’s their press release.

 

  • This, from Deepika Sharma of Khurana & Khurana Smart IP: Blockchain Technology in China. “Chinese government is introducing measures to protect blockchain IP they are also trying to bring it under China’s cyber security law.”

 

  • California Governor passes two bills in favor of blockchain. Details here. “That it was signed into law is a great testament to the work being done around the state by folks like the Blockchain Advocacy Coalition to advance this rapidly growing technology.”

 

  • Regarding federal blockchain legislation: “Ripple will lead a group of crypto startups to lobby lawmakers and financial regulators in D.C. to support crypto and blockchain innovation, Bloomberg reported on Thursday, September 27.” More here.

 

  • Here’s Volume 36 of K&L Gates’ Blockchain Energizer, summarizing three blockchain news stories.
  • I had to post this from Steptoe’s CYBERBLOG, if only for the title: Episode 232: “I’m afraid you can’t say that, Dave.” Will AI save the Internet from Vladimir Putin – and Matt Drudge? “It’s a deep conversation that turns contentious when we come to his prescriptions, which I see as reinstating the lefty elite that ran journalism for decades, this time empowered by even less self-doubt – and AI that can reproduce its prejudices at scale and without transparency.”

 

  • “According to the 2018 LexisNexis Australian Legal Tech Survey, across the board the Aussie legal profession is seeing a significant repositioning in the responsibilities set for junior lawyers when compared to past years, creating a shift in their law firm’s set up.” “The changing nature of work for junior lawyers is clearly a key driver of change within the legal industry, as 44 per cent of the respondents identified the removal of grunt work as a key implication of technologies such as analytics and AI”. More here.

I could not find any description of the survey’s methodology, so caveat emptor.

 

  • From The Law Society GazetteCall for regulation of police prediction algorithms. “A study published by the Royal United Services Institute and the Centre for Information Rights, University of Winchester, says that while machine-learning algorithms in policing are in their infancy, there is potential for the technology to do more: ‘The lack of a regulatory and governance framework for its use is concerning.’”

 

  • Brian McElligott of Mason Hayes & Curran posted this pieceIreland: AI From The Lawyers’ Perspective. “Machine learning, and to a much lesser extent artificial intelligence, has well and truly landed. The challenge for lawyers and their clients is how to navigate a legal and regulatory environment that is playing catch up and how to simultaneously steer innovators on a path to protection that may be paved with gaps.”

 

  • Dean Sonderegger of Wolters Kluwer wrote Building The Case For Innovation Within The Law Firm. I really appreciate this sort of mathematical demonstration of how driving out a bit of cost can translate to a firm’s bottom line.

 

  • I did not see this coming. This post from DLA Piper (Sharpen the nails: 8 ideas for empowering jurors In complex trials) includes, “Beyond simple note-taking tools, lawyers should consider more modern options, such as giving jurors access to interactive tablets to use for note keeping, and finding suitable ways to use artificial intelligence to assist jurors in maintaining and retrieving the evidence they hear and see during trial. … Allowing jurors the use of appropriate AI – for instance, teaching them how to search for trial testimony and admitted exhibits, or allowing them to query the judge – would allow more efficient deliberations.”

 

  • Holly Urban, CEO at EffortlessLegal wrote this piece for Law Technology Today: Five Ways for Law Firms to Become More Efficient. All five make sense for law firms and in-house legal departments.

 

  • John Frank Weaver of McLane Middleton prepared this scholarly piece: Everything Is Not Terminator We Need the California Bot Bill, But We Need It to Be Better. “There are some specific revisions that would make the Bot Bill a constitutional bill, a better bill, and a bill that we need.” He presents in-depth arguments for each suggested revision.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer: “After a very successful closed Beta programme, covering 161 users from 24 countries, they will be opening Clause to all on September 26th i.e. tomorrow. It will still be called a Beta programme, but in opening to all it will massively scale up the opportunity to use this tech and to give the team feedback to perfect the product.” Details and a demo video here.

 

  • From Sky News: Driverless car makers could face jail if AI causes harm. “Under the Health and Safety Act of 1974, directors found guilty of “consent or connivance” or neglect can face up to two years in prison.” “Companies can also be prosecuted under the Act, with fines relative to the firm’s turnover. If the company has a revenue greater than £50 million, the fines can be unlimited.” Several lawyers are quoted in this story.

 

  • intapp and The Lawyer just released this research report: Navigating a new reality in the client-empowered era. There is a section devoted to “An eye to the future: the emerging applications of artificial intelligence (AI).” “Clearly, firms are already reaping benefits from intelligent automation, whether through time saved or performance of the firm. The advent of artificial intelligence capabilities opens new possibilities above and beyond the ways in which law firms are currently automating workflows.” “In the future, using AI, we’ll be able to enhance the accuracy of the narratives suggested by time capture, so the process becomes even more automatic.” There is also a summary of some findings here. And here.

These survey results are based on the responses of 111 firms out of 300 who were solicited to participate. Not bad. The findings presented as percentages/proportions should generally be considered accurate within about +/- 10 percentage points.

 

  • Also from Artificial Lawyer: ‘Don’t Shoot the AI Puppy!’ – The United eDiscovery Case. “Last week, doubters of legal AI tech had a fleeting moment of validation – or at least they thought so – after a major ediscovery project involving United Airlines appeared to go wrong, leading some to suggest that there had been an ‘AI Snafu‘ after only 17% of the millions of docs analysed turned out to be ‘responsive’ i.e. of any potential use to the case. The problem with pointing the finger at the technology is that experts think (see response below from leading ediscovery consultant, Jonathan Maas) that this had far less to do with the Technology Assisted Review (TAR) itself and more about the way the humans involved ran the matter and used the tech.” Details here.

 

  • Here’s another interesting piece from Artificial Lawyer (It’s Not A Legal Snowflake – AI + Legal Costs Prediction): “To succeed in this environment, law firms must cost out litigation matters more accurately and competitively than they have ever done in the past. In fact, getting this right is mission critical. Fortunately, modern technology can provide an unprecedented degree of transparency and precision in cost estimation. The key is using artificial intelligence to unlock the predictive power of billing data.”

 

  • This (Data Localisation: India’s policy framework) is a thorough look at India’s new data protection policies. “Digital India and building a thriving Digital Economy in India, building strong competencies in artificial intelligence, protecting nation’s security and data of its citizens are very critical and is now becoming mandatory for India.”

 

  • This from Kennedy’s: Legal AI Beyond the Hype: A Duty to Combat Bias. “(T)o what extent have firms considered whether the AI they are licensing, building or selling (if that is what they are doing) has the potential to produce biased results?”

 

  • When asked, “(w)hat do you think is going to be the biggest game changer in the legal industry?” Martin Felli of JDA Software replied “(t)he use and application of Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the in-house environment, allowing legal departments to implement solutions to permit their clients to engage in self-help without having to involve the legal department on every item, such as NDA reviews and processing.” Here’s the rest of the interview.

 

  • Press release: “Thomson Reuters and ModuleQ announced today a partnership to assist professionals with time sensitive insights. The companies are integrating their AI technologies to help provide proactive distribution of mission-critical business information to clients’ front-line personnel.”

 

  • In this post, Mike Quartararo of eDPM Advisory Services urges law firms to proactively contact their clients about innovation, before they call another firm or one calls them.

 

  • Here’s another pitch for Westlaw Edge — this one with a government focus. Westlaw Edge: Helping Overburdened Government Attorneys Work Faster And Smarter With The Power Of AI.

 

  • To liven up your Wednesday and broaden your perspective on the range of AI’s impact, here’s a story about AI and the cannabis business and two (here and here) about AI and sex.

 

Blockchain

  • IBM and MIT in consultation with the Congressional Blockchain Caucus prepared this reportThe Impact of Blockchain for Government: Insights on Identity, Payments, and Supply Chain. “How can blockchain benefit government? How can government lead the way to a broad-based blockchain evolution that drives economic vitality? In this report, Thomas Hardjono—Director of the MIT Trust: Data Consortium—addresses these and related challenges by drawing insight from three roundtable discussions in 2017-18 among key leaders and stakeholders, hosted by the Congressional Blockchain Caucus.”

 

  • Over 75 New Banks: JPMorgan Expands Blockchain Payments Trial. “(A)ccording to a report from the FT on Tuesday, a large group of major banks – including Societe Generale and Santander – has joined the trial in response to the rising number of rival payments offerings coming to market.” More here.

 

  • From Entrepreneur: Smart Contracts: Here Are the Practical Applications of This Exciting Blockchain Technology. “Ever wanted to leave the lawyers out of your client transactions? Now you can.” “Smart contracts aren’t just the future of business; they are already in play. These agreements save time and money while improving communication and transparency. And you don’t need to be a programmer to get in on the action.”

 

  • Tom Kulik of Dallas’ Scheef & Stone posted Why Blockchain Is No Panacea For The Digital First Sale Doctrine (For Now). “…(T)echnology and the law don’t evolve at the same rate, and the digital first sale doctrine is no exception.  As this technology matures, it will inevitably pull copyright law forward in fits and starts…”

 

  • More from Mayer Brown’s Rebecca Eisner: Mayer Brown’s Tech Talks, Episode 1: Staying Ahead Of AI. The 24-minute lecture is aimed at “technology lawyers.” It starts with the basics of AI and gets to (the paltry) regulation of AI, AI IP, and specific legal applications. Good speaker with good material!

 

  • This article (What the ML Patent Application Boom Means for Tech) reports that in spite of a lack of precise numbers, it’s clear that there has been a substantial upswing in AI-related patents. “Lauren Hockett, … a partner in the San Diego office of intellectual property law firm Knobbe Martens, says … “My practice does involve a large number of machine learning and artificial intelligence patent applications, and that’s really blossomed over the past two to three years.” “Most of the applications I’ve prepared and filed in the machine learning and artificial intelligence space are relatively recent. Most of those are still waiting in line.” The patent backlog and reasons for it are discussed in-depth as are patent litigation (and the use of Machine Learning patents) as business tools/weapons.

 

  • This is an excellent post from ALM’s Erin Hichman and Patrick (still proud of that high school portrait) Fuller. AI: The Next Big Thing Is Already Here. It features “…five key takeaways to help keep your firm on top with technology.” “For law firm leaders, the question is not if they should invest in AI, but rather where should they start? Learn from early adopters both in and outside the legal industry to make smart AI investments.”

 

  • “Above the Law and Thomson Reuters launched Law2020, a four-part, multimedia exploration of how artificial intelligence and similar emerging technologies are reshaping the practice and profession of law.” “To accompany these articles, we have launched the Law2020 podcast, in which I interview distinguished legal and technology experts about AI’s effects on different fields and issues within the law. The episodes and experts are as follows:

1. Access to JusticeDaniel Linna, Professor of Law in Residence and the Director of LegalRnD – The Center for Legal Services Innovation at Michigan State University College of Law.

2. Legal EthicsMegan Zavieh, ethics and state bar defense lawyer.

3. Legal ResearchDon MacLeod, Manager of Knowledge Management at Debevoise & Plimpton and author of How To Find Out Anything and The Internet Guide for the Legal Researcher.

4. Legal AnalyticsAndy Martens, SVP & Global Head Legal Product and Editorial at Thomson Reuters.”

 

  • Shearman & Sterling has posted a link to “How can we ensure that big data does not make us prisoners of technology?” by Charles Randell, Chair of the FCA and Payment Systems Regulator. A brief summary is here.

 

  • Pillsbury’s Tim Wright wrote this piece for ComputerWeekly.com: AI: Black boxes and the boardroom. “Isaac Asimov, the famous science fiction writer, once laid down a series of rules to protect humanity from AI. Perhaps it is time businesses did the same. After all, we can’t know the future, but we can prepare for it. And with AI, the future is now.”

 

  • From the ABA Journal, Nicole Black of MyCase: Finding treasure with litigation data analytics software. “There is a treasure trove of litigation data that for years was virtually inaccessible. While court rulings and filings were available and individual documents could be accessed and viewed, the technology needed to search and analyze the data and provide useful, actionable information simply did not exist. In 2018, that’s no longer the case.”

Also from Nicole Black: The Duty of Legal Technology Competence: How To Keep Up and 3 Ways Law Firms Can Improve the Client Experience Using Technology.

 

  • Chatbots for law firms: “Tom Martin created LawDroid, a chatbot that drafts and files California incorporations over Facebook Messenger.” Details here.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:

– Legal AI company, LexPredict, has launched a new User Interface (UI) for its ContraxSuite NLP/ML platform to make it easier for a broader range of people, especially those who are not tech experts, to use the system. More here.

– Legal data collaboration company, HighQ, has just announced legal AI company, Kira Systems, as its launch partner for its new AI Hub platform, which allows supported third-party AI engines to be integrated into legal processes and workflows within HighQ. Details here.

Here’s their detailed summary of the first session of ILTACON 2018, 1st Legal AI Session Write Up, Looks Like ILTACON Loves AI.

 

Blockchain

  • “Chinese tech companies may outpace their foreign counterparts in developing blockchain technology with the help of government moves to foster intellectual property protections, IP attorneys told Bloomberg Law.” “Between 2008 and 2017, Chinese companies submitted 550 patent applications on blockchain technology around the world, surpassing the U.S. and South Korea to become the world’s largest applicant worldwide, according to a report by Chinese media site Sina.com.” Details here.
  • From Jones DayMajor Patent Offices Meet to Discuss Adoption of AI Tools.

 

  • In this post, Jones Day suggests that Trump may impose tariffs on AI: “President Trump is reportedly considering another round of Section 232 duties of potentially up to 25 percent on automobile and auto parts imports. … Additionally, the administration has suggested that it is considering whether to initiate Section 232 cases on other industries, including semiconductors and artificial intelligence.”

This opinion piece from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette suggests that China may resist. Here’s how a trade war over tariffs between America and China could play out.

 

 

  • From Fisher PhillipsRobots, Automation and A.I., Oh My – California Proposes to Establish “Commission on the Future of Work”

 

  • JDJournal posted this discussion of AI as a threat to legal jobs. “Perhaps the biggest challenge for law firms will be adapting to a new business model that embraces and incorporates AI. The hope  is that an increase in capabilities by a law firm will result in an increased ability to take on additional legal projects.”

 

  • Peter Darling, AI consultant to the legal industry has some interesting thoughts in this provocatively titled post: Start Learning to Trust Artificial Intelligence; You’ll Make More Money. “…(O)ne of the most important levers firm management can move to increase profitability is to make these processes more accurate, more efficient, faster and above all, less dependent on human beings. This saves the firm money and time and, ultimately, helps the bottom line. Artificial intelligence is ideal for automating a lot of these processes.”

 

 

  • JP Morgan is unleashing artificial intelligence on a business that moves $5 trillion for corporations every day. (It’s the treasury services division.) Details in this post.

And JP Morgan’s treasury management services unit “…is reportedly testing an artificial intelligence (AI)-powered bot to support corporate clients and anticipate their needs. The publication said such a bot would be a first for the corporate payments industry.” Story here.

 

  • I post about investments in legal AI every now and then, but I skip about 20 such stories for every one I post. This one seems particularly interesting: Seal Software unveils global partnership with DocuSign, announces $30 million in growth capital from Toba.

 

  • This teaser includes the link to a deep dive report by Deloitte titled: Machines with purpose. From theory to practice: Artificial Intelligence in professional services. The report is a review of where we are, the story of how we got here, and suggestions for selecting and implementing AI solutions. Oh, and they make the business case for doing so. Good stuff.

 

  • From the Law Society Gazette: “Britain has an opportunity to be a global leader in new technologies transforming legal business and access to justice – but should beware of complaceny, the minister for legal services said last night. ‘There is a lawtech revolution happening all over the world and I want to make sure the UK not only keeps pace with it but leads it,’ Lord Keen of Elie (Richard Keen QC) told an event to launch the latest ‘lawtech incubator’. However Keen warned ‘We cannot afford to be complacent’, pointing to competing initiatives in Canada and Singapore.”

 

  • This editorial from The Irish Times suggests that AI in legal may take a while, but “better faster cheaper” (my words) will come. Making a case for artificial intelligence in the legal profession.

 

  • Blockchain News:

– Cloudsight adds Bitcoin Lightning payment to allow instant AI-to-AI transactions. Story from VentureBeat here.

From Bloomberg LawBlockchain Patent Holders Look to Dodge Trolls, Lawsuits. “A surging number of blockchain experiments and related patent applications across various industries present ripe opportunities for patent assertion entities or trolls, as they’re often known, who could hamper innovation if not properly contained, patent attorneys say.”

 

  • Here’s more on MIT’s recent breakthrough on reading brainwaves. How to control robots with brainwaves and hand gestures. “Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory system enables people to correct robot mistakes on multiple-choice tasks.”

 

  • This is a cool infographic presentation about using AI in a small business. It includes sample vendors. Many of these applications are relevant for law firms. 12 Actionable Tips on How to Leverage Artificial Intelligence in a Small Business.

 

  • Because it’s Friday, here’s the link to a very good intro to AI from the Discovery Channel, it’s clear, pretty comprehensive, and very up-to-date. Here’s a review from c|net.