• From CBS News: “Cyberattacks targeting the 2018 midterm election aren’t just relying on tested tactics like phishing attacks, social media influence campaigns, and ransomware targeting critical infrastructure — they’re also harnessing technology in new and ever more threatening ways. Cybersecurity experts are concerned that emerging technology like artificial intelligence and automation powered by 

  • Here’s a deeper dive into Ron Friedmann’s argument that legal tech is in the midst of “evolution” rather than a “revolution”. It’s an interesting read, well-reasoned with several examples. “…(I)n-house counsel change buying habits slowly, which in turn slows legal innovation.” I love that he focuses on the “voice of the client,” as should we

  • From Above the Law, Patrick Fuller’s thoughts on law firms’ obstacles to adoption of AI-based technologies. “The biggest obstacles for getting firms to adopt AI tend to be combinations of different factors — most notable are attorney compensation structure, the matter’s fee arrangement, and the practice area as well.” More of Patrick’s thoughts and findings

Must Read: This (Lola v. Skadden and the Automation of the Legal Profession) long (77 pages), heavily annotated (404 footnotes) scholarly article from the Yale Journal of Law & Technology “analyzes the long-term impact of the Second Circuit’s opinion in Lola v. Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP, 620 F. App’x 37

  • Here’s some good news from North Carolina: North Carolina Bar considers requiring technology CLE credits. (Note the word “considers”.) “If adopted, the amendments will go into effect in 2019.” This is in response to “the American Bar Association … amendment to Comment 8 to Model Rule 1.1 in 2012. The comment imposed an ethical