There was very little real AI or blockchain news over the holidays, especially legal-related. But there was a plethora of posts reviewing 2018 and forecasting 2019 and beyond, so that’s the focus of this post. I suggest you skim these titles and then skim through the lists included in most of the posts; you’re likely

Must Read: If you’re especially interested in blockchain or just want to learn what it’s all about, read this fresh report from McKinsey & Co.: Blockchain beyond the hype: What is the strategic business value? (The interactive infographics are outstanding.) “Blockchain was a priority topic at Davos; a World Economic Forum survey suggested that 10

  • The big news yesterday was Thomson Reuters’ launch of “…Westlaw Edge, an updated, artificial intelligence-assisted legal research platform. The updates include new warnings for invalid or questionable law, litigation analytics, a tool to analyze statutory changes and an improved AI-enhanced search called WestSearch Plus.” Here’s their video promo piece, and here the press release. Kudos

  • As expected, AI-wise, Legaltech kicked off strong yesterday, including an “AI Bootcamp” called, “Use Cases and Applications of AI in Legal Services.” One of the earliest summaries I have seen is this from Artificial Lawyer. I’m especially pleased to see the emphasis on Access to Justice (A2J). The summary includes:

“(AI) can help you do

  • From Down Under: Dean of Swinburne Law School, Professor Dan Hunter, and Swinburne researcher Professor Mirko Bagaric say artificial intelligence (AI) could improve sentencing procedures by removing emotional bias and human error. Seems these gentlemen are unaware of 2017’s several instances of AI exhibiting bias and even racism. AI has a way to go