• Here’s a very interesting article from Oxford’s Internet Institute and Faculty of Law. It’s more than six months old, but I just found it. Artificial Intelligence Crime: An Interdisciplinary Analysis of Foreseeable Threats and Solutions. “Artificial Intelligence (AI) research and regulation seek to balance the benefits of innovation against any potential harms and disruption. However, one unintended consequence of the recent surge in AI research is the potential re-orientation of AI technologies to facilitate criminal acts, which we term AI-Crime (AIC).”

 

  • Baker McKenzie helped score a crucial win for Volt Bank, which has become the first Australian neobank to be granted a full banking license. “This is likely to drive materially improved banking services and further fintech innovation. It unlocks access to state-of-the-art software in the context of AI and data analytics in the banking space….” Story here.

 

  • AI patents: Who Profits From AI? It’s Getting Harder to Find Out. “The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is making it increasingly difficult to obtain legal protections for inventions related to AI, a field that encompasses autonomous cars, virtual assistants and financial analyses, among countless other uses. The agency, seeing an influx of AI applications, is grappling with how to comply with a law that PTO Director Andrei Iancu has called ‘anything but clear’.” Story here.

 

  • This, from Bloomberg: Artificial Intelligence Creeps Into Big Law, Endangers Some Jobs. “Major law firms are preparing to incorporate AI at a speedier pace than ever before in 2019, as the anticipated industrialization of legal services picks up steam. Client pressures have been mounting on law firms—often slow technology adopters—to address concerns that old tech is keeping bills unnecessarily high. Clients are demanding that firms use AI-infused tools to speed work, lower costs, and provide better information.”

 

  • MyCase’s  postedI, For One, Welcome Our New Robot Lawyer Overlords. “Ready or not, the robot lawyers are coming. Or not. It really depends on who you ask.”

 

  • Here’s an innovative ALSP idea: What Happens When Legal Tech Meets Blockchain. “The result was a creation of an online platform that provides entrepreneurs with an access to a global network of ‘Legal Nodes‘– competent tech-savvy legal experts worldwide, from which businesses can “mine” relevant information to ease their journey through complex data sets of law, just like one would normally mine Bitcoin by connecting to thousands of nodes worldwide.”

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

  • Kerrrrching..! DISCO Bags $83m Investment – Now Has $125m in Total – A World Record. Post here.

 

  • The Global Legal Hackathon Is One Month Away – Get Your Teams Ready! Post here.

 

  • Insurer ARAG Links With LawDroid In Legal Bot Project World First. Post here.

 

Law Firm Posts:

  • From Tim Watkins of Coffin Mew: Will AI replace lawyers? Assessing the potential of artificial intelligence in legal services. “To suggest that this symbolises the imminent end of human lawyers is perhaps leaping to a hasty conclusion. But it does raise a number of interesting questions. Are lawyers – or indeed any professional advisers and service providers – ultimately replaceable? And if so, how, where, and to what extent?” Post here.

 

 

  • This post is from Skadden’s John Adebiyi Pascal Bine Matthias Horbach Dmitri V. Kovalenko Jason Hewitt and Mikhail KoulikovForeign Investment Control Reforms in Europe. “Key sectors that will be subject to the framework are: critical infrastructure, critical technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, semiconductors, dual-use, cybersecurity, space, nuclear), critical inputs, sensitive information, media, land and real estate, water supply infrastructure, data processing and electoral infrastructure.”

 

Press Releases and Sponsored Content:

  • ContractPodAi launches Salesforce App as it continues its push outside the legal function. Release here.

 

  • Building a Brilliant Brief Library: Your How-To Guide. “In this article, we’ll cover the basics of building your own brief library, from tips on finding the best available documents to developing winning strategies to stay one step ahead of opposing counsel in litigation.” This piece is by Josh Blandi of UniCourt.

 

  • Tikit Carpe Diem introduces Intelligent Time. “(Which) interprets free form text and / or dictated notes and converts it (using Natural Language Processing), into structured and fully validated time entries. It turns unstructured data into structured data by converting attorney’s thoughts into fully formed time records.” Release here.

 

  • Litigation In The Age Of Big Data: How Everlaw Is Tackling The Most Complex Technical Issues In eDiscovery. “As technology continues to evolve at a rapid pace, lawyers and eDiscovery professionals are seeing their workloads and challenges expand.” Post here.