• Here’s a good summary of tools from This Tech Can Turn the Tables in Litigation. “If you can eliminate some of the chance from litigation, if you can bring a higher level of certainty to litigation, why wouldn’t you? Indeed, you might even ask yourself, ‘Is it malpractice not to use analytics?‘”

 

  • Also from Bob: LawNext Episode 21: Blockchain, Smart Contracts and the Future of Law, with Casey Kuhlman of Monax. It’s a 45-minute interview sponsored by MyCase.

 

  • In this short post (Blockchain: Resources To Get On Top Of This Technology), Olga V. Mack offers several good tips for learning about blockchain. “What follows is a compilation of resources in no particular order that I and many other professionals have found useful.”

 

  • This, from EY: Companies ready for leases standard, but only with help, finds EY 2018 Lease Accounting Change Survey. “Automation is a long-term goal, with artificial intelligence (AI) playing an important role. More than 80% of companies are working toward designing a long-term automated solution, with only 5% saying they will use a manual, spreadsheet-based approach long term. Interestingly, more than half (51%) who are implementing automation say the solution includes using AI to identify and abstract lease data.”

 

  • The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) publishedShould we create a certification for AI ethics? “Matthew Stender, a Berlin-based tech ethicist and researcher: ‘…(C)ertainly in the U.S. — regulators’ hands were tied by trade secret laws and the ‘speech is code’ model. ‘For me, the idea of voluntary technical standards provide an interesting alternative to national legislation,” he said.'”

 

  • From Littler: Thought Leaders Predict AI’s Impact on the Workforce. “The consensus of Roundtable participants is that while automation is likely to displace workers in many occupations, it also will spur enormous demand for workers in both existing fields and in new occupations that technological change will generate.” The seven-page report is here.

 

  • Lord Chief backs “smartphone justice” but not so keen on AI. “There is no reason why our online courts and justice systems cannot deliver effective and accessible justice direct to the citizen. Both the Lord Chancellor and I (Lord Chief Justice Burnett) are in agreement on this.” “AI, however, is one area where, while much has been done, we are in the foothills, rather than the uplands, of understanding how and where it can properly be utilised.” More here.

 

  • From Emilie Ducorps-Prouvost of Soulier AvocatsLabor Law And The Challenges Of Artificial Intelligence: 3rd Part Of A Trilogy. “Labor and employment law should be used as a legal tool to steer the obvious changes brought by AI in the workplace.” The article and links to first two parts here.

 

  • Detroit Legal News published: Artificial intelligence in health care: What you need to know. The article includes specific applications and general discussion. And: “It’s all about the data“. “There’s no question that AI can process and analyze information at a rate far beyond any human capacity, but human intellect still remains a key component-not just in further training the algorithm or interpreting the information that’s presented, but in making the connections as how to best use that information in the future.”

 

  • Giangiacomo Olivi of Dentons postedArtificial Intelligence meets AdTech: digital disruption, data privacy and future perspectives. “AI will boost AdTech one-step further and introduce scenarios that will challenge current legal and industry standards, while requesting new and more dynamic approaches to online advertising. So, how is this going to happen and at what future perspectives should we expect?”

 

  • Here’s an interesting essay from How AI and analytics made the billable hour redundant. “If predictive analytics and AI kill off the billable hour for good, they may also prove to be the saviour of a profession that has been under pressure to change for years.”

 

  • Cadwalader postedLabCFTC Explains Functionality And Risks Of Smart Contract Technology, but did not include a link to the report, which I found here. It’s a pretty deep dive (32 pages).

 

  • Tiffany Quach and Stéphanie Martinier of Proskauer postedIs Blockchain Technology Compatible With GDPR? French Data Protection Regulator Provides Guidance. “To address tensions between blockchain technology and the GDPR, Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL), the French data protection regulator, published an initial report analyzing certain fundamental questions regarding the interaction between blockchain technology and the GDPR’s requirements (the “Report”). The Report was the first guidance issued by a European data protection regulator on this topic.”