• O’Melveny is getting a lot of coverage of its recent announcement that it will use neuroscience-based games in its recruitment process. See stories here, here, here and here.

 

  • This post was prepared by Kurt Watkins of Contextum and Matthew Savare of Lowenstein Sandler and published by the ACC via Lexology: The Rise of Artificial Intelligence and its Impact on General Counsel. It’s a solid deep dive and includes specific advice for GCs. “The technological advancement of AI and its concomitant increased adoption in the legal profession cannot be stopped. For many years, lawyers believed that AI would not impact them or their profession. Think again. In order to stay ahead of the proverbial curve, general counsel need to understand this transformation, adjust their ways of thinking….”

 

  • Seyfarth’s Hannah L. JacksonRaymond Tran and Theodore E. Woodward postedWave Of The Future: The Effect Of AI And Robotics On Commercial Real Estate. It’s a solid, rather in-depth look. “Advancements in AI robotics and integration with the IoT have the potential to change the way that commercial properties are owned, leased, managed and operated in the future.”

 

  • The Centre for Information Policy Leadership (“CIPL”) at Hunton Andrews Kurth recently published the first report in its project on Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) and Data Protection: Delivering Sustainable AI Accountability in Practice. The report, entitled “Artificial Intelligence and Data Protection in Tension” aims to describe in clear, understandable terms: what AI is and how it is being used all around us today; the role that personal data plays in the development, deployment and oversight of AI; and the opportunities and challenges presented by AI to data protection laws and norms.” Overview here.

 

  • This, from DLA Piper: International Trade Alert. “The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) on November 19, 2018 requesting public comment on identifying ’emerging technology.’ Under the Export Control Reform Act of 2018 (ECRA), which was signed into law on August 13, 2018, the Department of Commerce is authorized to establish export controls on emerging and foundational technologies under the framework of the Commerce Control List (CCL). In the ANPRM, BIS indicated that it will issue a separate ANPRM for ‘foundational technology’.”

 

  • The Alliott Group (Maciej Kokotposted: An Alternative Perspective On Use Of Artificial Intelligence In Professional Firms. “This article, written by Alliott Group Polish accounting and law firm member ALTO, provides an alternative perspective on AI’s role in the mid-size firm. Authors Maciej Kokot and Wojciech Kokot propose we question the preconceptions and fears we have surrounding AI, and instead invite accountants and lawyers to familiarise themselves with its capabilities. From automating rudimentary accounting services to streamlining first-line support using chatbots, this article outlines why we have every reason to feel positively about the rise of AI.”

 

  • This post is from Switzerland’s Bär & Karrer‘s Andrew M. GarbarskiThe Sealing Of Evidence Under Swiss Criminal Procedure Law. “The fast-changing technical landscape and the potentially endless capabilities of artificial intelligence may ultimately offer better solutions for judicial authorities and practitioners alike. However, in the meantime, both must turn towards the case law of the SFSC to find practical ways of dealing with the increasing complexity of unsealing procedures.”

 

  • If you’re interested in how the Skunkworks approach to innovation adoption can work at a law firm (I am!), check out this podcast interview with Orrick’s Chair, Mitch Zullie.

 

  • Here’s a rather academic piece from the University of Toronto — Faculty of Law’s Benjamin Alarie, Anthony Niblett and Albert YoonHow Artificial Intelligence Will Affect the Practice of Law. “In the short run, we can expect greater legal transparency, more efficient dispute resolution, improved access to justice, and new challenges to the traditional organization of private law firms delivering legal services on a billable hour basis through a leveraged partner-associate model.” “In the longer term, it is difficult to predict the impact of artificially intelligent tools will be, as lawyers incorporate them into their practice and expand their range of services on behalf of clients.”

 

  • “A subsidiary of the German arm of Clifford Chance has entered into a partnership to advance the development of an AI platform. Clifford Chance Tech GmbH and German firm EVANA will work together to enhance EVANA’s platform for corporate law and M&A transactions.” More here, here and here.

 

  • In this post, Law Society Council member, addresses the question, “…if you are going to receive advice or even representation from either a solicitor or a robot with artificial intelligence, should the criteria for the product be the same in each case?” Interesting read.

 

  • Dentons’ Todd D. DaubertPeter G. FeldmanJason M. Silverman and Michael E. Zolandz posted: BIS Begins Process For Export Controls Of “Emerging And Foundational” Technologies: What Tech Companies Need To Know. “On November 19, the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), which controls the export of sensitive dual-use and less-sensitive military goods and technology, took an important preliminary step in establishing the review and control process required under ECRA. The agency published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM), soliciting comments from the public on specific matters related to identifying and controlling emerging and foundational technologies.” More here.

 

  • Also from Dentons (this time, Eric J. TanenblattCrawford Schneider and James A. Richardson): Autonomous Vehicles Start Act Legislative Update. “Republicans are eager to finally advance a light-touch autonomous vehicle regulatory framework after the proposal has languished for more than a year in committee over cyber and safety concerns.”

 

  • Here’s part 6 of Mintz’ Strategies To Unlock AI’s Potential In Healthcare, Commercialization Of AI Tools In Healthcare – The Challenge Of Securing Adequate Data Rights.

 

  • A blog on behalf of CILEx Regulation by Eve Dullabh, managing director of the Law Training Centre in Kent: Reality versus the robot lawyers. “…(L)egal training will be required to adapt accordingly to provide the skills to the modern lawyer in order to remain indispensable in the era of AI technology. Cyber-security training, management of risk training and coding will, inevitably, become part of every lawyer’s legal training and, already, some of the top firms in the country have recognised this and instructed that all their trainees undertake coding training. The future is now and embracing the evolution of the new legal era will prepare us for the things to come.”

 

  • Steven D. Lofchie of Cadwalader postedFRB Governor Brainard Focuses On Risks And Supervisory Approaches Associated With AI. “Federal Reserve Board (“FRB”) Governor Lael Brainard urged firms to be mindful of risks associated with artificial intelligence (‘AI’) innovation and advised regulators to remain diligent in the quest to understand and regulate the use of AI by supervised firms.”

 

  • Also from Steven D. Lofchie, FDIC Chair McWilliams Urges More Collaboration On FinTech. “In remarks delivered at the FinTech and the New Financial Landscape Conference, Ms. McWilliams underscored that innovation is expanding bank access to more customers, and that new technology has enhanced ‘customer experience, [lowered] transaction costs, and increase[d] credit availability’.”

 

  • WilmerHale‘s Timothy Syrett and Natalie R. Pous prepared this articleThe Developing Landscape Of Internet Of Things Standards For Cars, “the first in a series of five articles written by WilmerHale discussing how the emergence of IoT technologies will impact the automotive industry. “The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the connection of a multitude of devices through the Internet to collect and exchange data. One area of particular promise for the IoT is cars. Exchanges of data between cars on a street, between cars and pedestrians crossing the street, between cars and traffic lights on the street, and between cars and the Internet could improve safety, reduce traffic, save fuel, and make for a more entertaining drive.”

 

  • And here‘s a closely related article, also from Wilmer (this time by Christian DuvernoyFrédéric LouisDr. Martin BraunAnne ValleryItsiq Benizri and Naboth van den Broek): The European Commission Launches A Public Consultation On Connected And Automated Vehicles. “The ambition of the European Union (“EU”) is to become a world leader in the deployment of connected and automated mobility. The EC believes that driverless mobility and connectivity will help bring down the number of road fatalities and reduce harmful emissions and congestion. In this context, the EC published a Communication in which it identified the actions it would take to guide the sector and EU countries to reach its objectives. One of these actions is to issue a Recommendation to complement the regulatory framework for connected and automated mobility and to help EU countries achieve a coordinated approach in this respect.”

 

 

 

  • From Jones DayDriverless, Networked Vehicles on the Rise, French Liability Regulations Lag Behind. “The Situation: Autonomous cars with incorporated artificial intelligence (“AI”) are now a reality whereas French regulations have yet to adjust. The Issue: The phenomenon of new autonomous cars using AI gives rise to questions about how product liability principles will apply and adapt thereto. Looking Ahead: Carmakers should already be considering what liability risks could be created by incorporating AI in autonomous cars and how to mitigate such risks.”

 

  • Andy Neill of HighQ postedWhat’s artificial about ethical AI in the law? Everything. “Lawyers are trained and have studied ethics. They must be utilised to succeed in creating ethical AI programs.” It’s an interesting read.

 

  • Here’s an important and useful study conducted by Dentons: Dentons submits results of research into the development of global legislation in robotics, AI and cyberphysical systems. “Dentons global law firm has carried out unique, large-scale research of the development of law and legislation on robotics, artificial intelligence and cyberphysical systems. The research was commissioned by the Competency Center for Statutory Regulation of the Digital Economy, which operates at the Skolkovo Foundation. It is the first such research done in Russia.”

 

  • This post is from Hungary’s KCG Partners Law FirmFree Flow Of Non-Personal Data In The European Union. “According to the communication of the European Parliament, the Council of the EU will adopt the regulation in the coming weeks, before it will enter into force by the end of the year. The Member States will have 6 months to apply the new rules from the date of the formal adoption of the regulation.”

 

  • Here’s a taste of what to expect at the “Emerging Legal Departments: Legal Tech 101” roundtable (Evolve the Law, Above the Law’s Legal Innovation Center at Logikcull’s San Francisco headquarters) on December 5. Monica Zent and Stephanie Corey will lead the discussion.

 

  • From José Santacroce of Moeller IP Advisors we have: The European Patent Office (EPO) Publishes New Guidelines On Computer-Implemented Inventions (CII). “…(T)he new EPO CII Guidelines include for the first time new sections on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), and on Simulation, design or modelling.” Post here.

 

  • Philip Cupitt of Marks & Clerk posted: Artificial Intelligence: Is Your Business Ready? “Our own research at Marks & Clerk reveals that more than 78,000 patent applications relating to AI were filed around the world in 2017. On current trends, we’ll see around 86,000 such patent applications filed in 2018, which represents almost a twofold increase in the past decade.”

 

  • Government invests to research how AI can improve the law was posted on Legal Futures by Dan Bindman, “The government is funding research into the potential for artificial intelligence (AI) to improve the legal system, with a warning that, if the technology is mishandled, it could have dire consequences. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) will fund three research projects into aspects of AI costing £3m, of which ‘Unlocking the potential of AI for law’ is one.”

 

  • HBR Consulting postedLaw firms must act with urgency to keep pace with law department analytics maturity. “…(L)aw departments are gathering, centralizing and sharing more data than ever, and many law firms are lagging behind.”

 

  • Law schools are often (and often justifiably) accused of not keeping pace with innovations in the business of law. But here are some noteworthy exceptions: You Think Legal Education Can’t Change? 8 Innovative Ideas from Law Schools.

 

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

– Few GCs Have ‘Digital Transformation Skills’ – LawGeex Report. Link.

– Nordic Law Firms Go All-In For Legal AI, (Especially Luminance), But Why? Link.

– UK Gov + MoJ Back Major Research Project to Boost Legal AI Use. Link.

– Relativity Partner QDiscovery Buys Evidox in eDiscovery Consolidation Move. Link.

 

Blockchain

 

  • Smart Contracts May Have Weaknesses. This Tool Helps Find Them. “ released a blockchain security monitoring service that includes a tool by ConsenSys Diligence allowing users to scan smart contracts for vulnerabilities.” Story here.

 

  • Pinsent Masons postedMEPs call for business GDPR ‘guarantee’ on using blockchain. “Businesses should not begin using blockchain technology to process personal data until they can ‘guarantee compliance’ with EU data protection laws, a committee of MEPs has said.”

 

 

  • This, from Sheppard Mullin: United States: The Hammer Falls On The First Major Blockchain-Based Art Auction. “Christie’s made history again last night during its evening sale, An American Place: The Barney A. Ebsworth Collection, at 20 Rockefeller Center in New York. This time, the history was not in the form of a record-setting sale (though the sale brought in $317.8 million), but as the first major art auction to be recorded by distributed ledger technology.”

 

 

  • Here’s a blockchain milestone: “Abu Dhabi-headquartered Al Hilal Bank has carried a blockchain-based transaction for an Islamic bond worth $500 million. The bank, an investment arm of the Abu Dhabi government, announced Monday that it settled the Islamic, shariah-compliant bond, or sukuk, worth $500 million on the secondary market, using blockchain tech.”

 

  • And here’s another: Real Estate on the Blockchain: $20 Million Sale ‘. “In the first offering of its kind, U.S. investors can now acquire a piece of South Carolina real estate in the form of blockchain tokens. The tokens represent ownership in a luxury student residence called The Hub … which is located near the University of South Carolina in the state’s capital.”

 

  • This is an interesting article from the December issue of the ABA JournalWhat do AI, blockchain and GDPR mean for cybersecurity? “…(W)e close this series by looking around the bend to understand how major emerging technologies will affect cybersecurity in the coming years. While experts disagree when technologies such as artificial intelligence and blockchain will play a larger role in cybersecurity and data protection, there is broad agreement that their roles will be pivotal. This could, in turn, create new solutions, risks and regulatory headaches.”