• I love this “back of the envelope” answer to “Is it AI?” from Karen Hao and the MIT Technology Review.

 

 

  • This half-hour podcast from MeDermott’s Week in Health Law series addresses AI & the Practice of Medicine. Five guests participate (Terry Dee, Jiayan Chen, Kate McDonald, Dale Van Demark, Eric Fish). Topics include where AI in medicine is headed, the need for regulation, privacy, liability, insurance and more. Sorry about the audio quality.

 

  • From Buckley Sandler, here’s a brief summary of Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard’s remarks at the 11/13 “Fintech and New Financial Landscape” conference. “Brainard’s prepared remarks emphasize the benefits and potential risks to bank safety and consumer protection that new AI applications pose.”

 

  • AI probe hears calls for ethics code. “Calls for a code of ethics, concerns about ‘Minority Report’-style crime prediction systems and a proposal for a new legal framework governing data ownership were among the evidence presented to the second public meeting of a landmark probe into the use of algorithms in the justice system. Appearing before the Technology and Law Policy Commission last week, The Hon. Mr. Justice Knowles called for the development of an ethical and legal framework for artificial intelligence. ‘AI is going to go deeper into people’s lives than many things have before,’ he told the commission chaired by Law Society president Christina Blacklaws. ‘It is imperative that we take the opportunity for law and ethics to travel with it.’” Here’s the brief summary from The Law Society Gazette.

 

  • Also from The Law Society GazetteEmbrace technology before your business model is threatened, Welsh firms told. This article summarizes “a seminar held by the National Assembly for Wales on the challenges presented by artificial intelligence and automation to legal services….”

 

  • Greenberg Traurig’s Paul Ferrillo posted this along with SDI Cyber’s George PlatsisQuantum Computing to Protect Data: Will You Wait and See or Be an Early Adopter? “So while we are still very much in the “zone of the unknown” a word of advice: if you’re a data-heavy organization and you plan to use and keep that data for years to come, you need to start thinking about new and alternate forms of encryption today.”

 

  • Here’s another thought piece from Mark A. CohenWhat Are Law Schools Training Students For? “Law is entering the age of the consumer and bidding adieu to the guild that enshrined lawyers and the myth of legal exceptionalism. That’s good news for prospective and existing legal consumers.” He addresses the challenges this will present for law schools. “These changes are affecting what it means to ‘think like a lawyer’ and, more importantly, what skills “legal” skills are required in today’s marketplace.”

 

 

  • From MobiHealthNews: Roundup: 12 healthcare algorithms cleared by the FDA. “As AI cements its role in healthcare, more and more intelligent software offerings are pursuing 510(k) and De Novo approvals.” Each of the 12 are summarized here.

 

  • Here (Geek comes of age), Joanna Goodman provides a good summary of this year’s Legal Geek event and the look into the future presented.

 

  • This story appeared in the New Hampshire Union LeaderIs Alexa’s speech protected? “The proper police procedures for searching a home or briefcase have been hammered out through decades of case law. But the question of how easy it should be for police to access the vast troves of data collected by the so-called internet of things — devices like Amazon’s Echo, Google’s Home, smart toasters, and other household objects equipped with sensors and connected to networks — is far from settled law.” Several credible sources are cited for opinion.

 

  • Ashley Deeks of the University of Virginia Law School penned: Artificial Intelligence and the Resort to Force. “How will AI change the way states make decisions about when to resort to force under international law? Will the use of AI improve or worsen those decisions? What should states take into account when determining how to use AI to conduct their jus ad bellum analyses?” This post is an overview of a larger article by Deeks and two colleagues.

 

  • Eamonn Moran of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton wrote: A Regulator’s Assessment of the Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Financial Services. The Federal Reserve Board’s “Fintech working group is working across the Federal Reserve System ‘to take a deliberate approach to understanding the potential implications of AI for financial services, particularly as they relate to our responsibilities.'” Here’s the full post.

 

  • Former Lehman lawyer predicts big role for AI post-Brexit. “A former senior counsel for Lehman Brothers investment bank and artificial intelligence (AI) technology pioneer has predicted AI will be crucial in helping companies alter thousands of contracts rapidly in the aftermath of Brexit. Beth Anisman, former global chief administrative officer in Lehman’s legal compliance and audit department, who subsequently co-founded an AI company, Apogee Legal – recently sold to e-discovery giant Seal Software – said disentangling contracts following Lehman’s collapse 10 years ago would have benefited from AI.” More here.

 

Blockchain

  • From BlockTribuneBlockchain, AI and the Legal System – Will Tech Lead The Law? “What happens when technologies, such as deep learning software and self-enforcement code, lead legal decisions? How can one ensure that next-generation legal technology systems are not unfairly biased against certain groups or individuals? And what skills will lawyers need to develop in order to properly assess the quality of justice that flows from data-driven decisions?” “Mireille Hildebrandt, professor at the law, science, technology and society research group at Vrije Universiteit Brussels in Belgium, will formulate and respond to during a five-year project to investigate the implications of what she calls ‘computational law’.” More here.

 

  • K&L Gates has posted Volume 38 of it’s Blockchain Energizer Energy Alert, this time summarizing three recent developments.

 

  • West Virginia Secretary of State Reports Successful Blockchain Voting in 2018 Midterm Elections. “…(I)n the 2018 midterm elections, 144 military personnel stationed overseas from 24 counties were able to cast their ballots on a mobile, blockchain-based platform called Voatz….” More here.