• From CBS News: “Cyberattacks targeting the 2018 midterm election aren’t just relying on tested tactics like phishing attacks, social media influence campaigns, and ransomware targeting critical infrastructure — they’re also harnessing technology in new and ever more threatening ways. Cybersecurity experts are concerned that emerging technology like artificial intelligence and automation powered by big data and the Internet of Things is helping hackers attack election systems faster than officials can keep up.” Frightening story here.

 

  • Speaking of Cybersecurity, here’s a summary by Heidi Alexander of last week’s College of Law Practice Management Futures Conference that focused on the subject. “Over and over, speakers described cybersecurity as a moving target owing to the constantly evolving nature of cyberthreats. The first panel aptly quoted computer security expert Bruce Schneier: ‘You can’t defend. You can’t prevent. The only thing you can do is detect and respond.’ And here’s some coverage by Nicole Black.

 

  • “Oliver Duchesne, Client Operations Associate at Priori, sits down with Richard Susskind to discuss the future of law, technology and the evolving relationship between the two.” “One illustration (of the change coming to the legal world) is in the area of online courts, which is the subject of my next book. They weren’t really on anyone’s radar in 2013. However, I’m now aware of twenty or so jurisdictions around the world that are taking them seriously. Fifteen years from now, our courts, a fundamental legal institution, will be changed beyond recognition because physically congregating in a courtroom will be a rarity, particularly for lower value claims.” Here‘s the interview.

 

  • Here‘s an interesting and engaging interview 45-minute with Joshua Fireman, Ron Friedmann and Tom Baldwin, partners at Fireman & Company: “Join us as we discuss with them the changes in the legal industry, particularly challenges and opportunities for knowledge management programs. They review the evolution of KM from 1.0 to 2.0 to 3.0, from a cost center to a revenue driver, and from being useful to being critical. They also give advice for those looking to enter the profession or to develop their skills.” (Don’t let the low-quality audio production deter you.)

 

  • From CooleyAlert: European Patent Office Gives Guidance on Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. “In order to receive a European patent for an invention, the invention needs to be novel, inventive and susceptible of industrial application. As part of meeting these requirements, the claimed subject-matter needs to have a technical character as a whole. The new guidance helps to assess whether inventions relating to artificial intelligence have the necessary technical character.”

 

  • Brief: Advocates Call For New US Federal Authority On Artificial Intelligence. “Public Knowledge, a Washington, DC advocacy group, today released a paper calling for the formation of a new federal government authority to develop expertise and capacity on artificial intelligence (AI), to be able to effectively regulate and govern these technologies in the future.” More here.

 

  • In this story about the move to the Cloud, the legal industry is cited as an example: “The Legal industry is an example of one not moving quite as fast, but there’s still a huge number of start-ups or Software-as-a-Service providers that are offering really unique solutions in the legal industry,…” “Whether they’re trying to just target the individual to say you don’t need to get a lawyer, or a solicitor; what you really need to do for your estate plan is just go through this wizard online and pay us £20. That’s disruptive to a traditional law firm. So even in an industry slow to adopt the cloud, I know that there are active pressures in the market that are going to change the way that lawyers interact with technology, and they way they interact with their clients. They’re going to have to really be thoughtful about how they work their way through this…”

 

  • From MacLean’s: “Your mall map sees the expression on your face. It knows how you feel. Creeped out yet?” “…(N)owhere in the mall does it say there are all-but-hidden cameras that are able to use facial-recognition technology on unsuspecting shoppers. As shoppers go about their day, buying everything from shoes to books, most are unaware of the latest technology their mall may be using to gather data on them—be it their age, their gender or even their mood.” Story here.

 

  • Press release: “Consilio, a global leader in eDiscovery, document review, risk management, and legal consulting services, has announced it has acquired DiscoverReady, a premier eDiscovery, document review, and compliance solutions provider. The combined company will operate more than 70 offices, review centers, and data centers around the world in 11 countries. The company’s global operations will continue to serve investigation, litigation, and compliance matters of all sizes and complexities, anywhere in the world.”

 

  • Press release: Search Acumen: Legal proptech will “hit warp speed” within five years. “(With) much-hyped technologies like artificial intelligence and blockchain becoming firmly established within property processes. Legal professionals will increasingly rely on property data visualisations and insights derived from millions of data points, analysed in seconds, to replace traditional search reports which take weeks to source.”

 

  • This, from Foley: Artificial Intelligence now being used to predict the Next Big Earthquake! (Somewhat interesting little post, but I’m not sure why Foley posted it.)

 

  • In NewLaw Journal, “Sophie Gould reports on how in-house lawyers are adopting & adapting advances in legal technology.” Several interesting case studies are cited as are some recent stats.

 

  • IPKat postedAuctioning Art(ificial Intelligence): The IP implications of Edmond de Belamy. More about that story and the IP implications of AI-generated art here.

 

Blockchain

  • This, from Artificial Lawyer: OpenLaw Launches Blockchain-Based IP Ownership System. “…(T)o that end, smart contract pioneer, OpenLaw, has just launched a blockchain-based system for helping artists securely control and profit from their IP, which will no doubt be of interest to many lawyers, not just the ones who do the art collecting for their firms.”

 

  • Here’s the latest from K&L Gates’ blockchain energy blog: Blockchain Energizer – Volume 37. Five interesting stories are covered.

 

  • Coding Abilities Becoming Valuable to Lawyers as Blockchain Tech Develops. “Opportunities for lawyers with a firm grasp of technology are most robust in areas related to compliance or incident response. Hands-on experience with computer programming and coding could become more valuable to attorneys as legal blockchain technologies develop over the next five years.” Story here.