• Wow. This tool sounds like a serious way for in-house counsel to leverage AI to better choose outside counsel. There’s No Such Thing As A Competitive Legal Market — But There Are Ways To Make It Better. “Bodhala’s legal analytics offer in-house counsel a wealth of information about the entire Am Law 200, high-quality boutiques, as well as a number of local firms that clients can easily customize to find exactly what they want. The platform also leverages machine learning technology to make predictive calls about opportunities to lower costs with other firms. Beyond talent procurement, the product offers spend optimization features that grant clients an opportunity to really market test quotes for legal services.” Press release here.

 

  • From Gerry Riskin: Next Step in Law-Firm AI Implementation? Getting the Lawyers on Board. “Even at DLA Piper, one of the major users of legal technology (such as the contract and document analysis programs available through Kira Systems), Director of Innovation Adam Hembury estimates that his firm is using only one percent of the overall potential AI support currently available to its lawyers.”

 

  • From WombleInnovation in construction and law: unlocking new value. “To address this, law firms are exploring the use of: Artificial Intelligence (AI) powered tools that provide machine learning capabilities. These are being widely adopted by the legal profession and over the next few decades software systems such as that provided by Kira Systems will apply machine-learning techniques to many of the routine tasks presently undertaken by lawyers, in a way which improves accuracy and limits risk. …”

 

  • State Bar of Michigan On Balance podcast: NEXT Conference 2018: Artificial Intelligence, Ethics, and Automation. “Nicole Black talks about artificial intelligence and other legal technology.” “She shares tips for automating your practice, with and without AI, and ethics advice to keep in mind when using the cloud and social media.” Here’s a link to the 13-minute podcast.

 

  • Must you disclose what your bot is up to? California weighs in on AI. “The California Legislature recently tackled this issue and the dilemma between the legitimate and productive use of ‘bots’ and the misleading and often socially disruptive use of this technology. In Senate Bill 1001, which was signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Sept. 28, the Legislature took the approach of requiring disclosure when a company or a political advocacy group is using a ‘bot’ to communicate with people. The operative language of the law is it is illegal for ‘any person to use a bot to communicate or interact with another person in California online …. to incentivize a purchase or sale of goods or services in a commercial transaction or to influence a vote in an election.'” The post is by Glen W. Price of Best Best & Krieger.

 

  • This, from EntreprenuerWhy Big-Name Investors Like Mark Cuban Are Disrupting the Legal Profession. “It does not seem an obvious or exciting industry for big-name investors. But, some of the most famous entrepreneurs — now including billionaire Mark Cuban — are putting their money into disrupting the legal profession.”

 

  • Five9 Aims To Unlock Insight From Contact Center With Artificial Intelligence. “Five9 has offered new AI features, such as the Five9 Genius, that delivers contextual and intelligent routing using unstructured data from emails, chats and other data channels to derive customer intent. It includes real-time natural language processing, business rules, and open AI connectors to create more intelligent routing and agent guidance.” Much more here.

 

  • The objectives of this video from Law Technology Today are:
    • Learn practical tips on how to bring innovation to legal services
    • Discover the key elements of innovation initiatives
    • Hear best practices in the evaluation, deployment, and adoption of technology
    • Understand the building blocks necessary to be successful

It features Jim Lupo of Northwestern Law, Tariq Abdullah of Walmart, and Wendy Curits and Daryl Shetterly from Orrick.

 

  • Press releaseCorporate Counsels and Contract Management: A Guide to Making the Case for Technology. “Exigent’s new guide, Corporate Counsels and Contract Management: A Guide to Making the Case for Technology, dives deeper into the ins and outs of legal technology. It provides some key questions to ask to identify the right solution for your business, including: What are your security needs? What functionality is and isn’t necessary? How much training will members of your organization need to use the new technology?”

 

  • This, from contractworks: An Introductory Guide to Contract Risk Assessment. “How to analyze, measure, and score your contract terms to identify risks, maintain compliance, and improve operational oversight.”

 

  • Artificial Intelligence – A Counterintelligence Perspective: Part IV by Jim Baker: “Instead, in keeping with the counterintelligence focus of this series, I want to discuss two important baskets of implications and risks related to XAI (explainable AI) and ethical AI:  (1) effective management of certain operational, privacy and reputational risks; and (2) adversaries’ use of black-box AI.” Post here.

 

  • Teaching Technology Today: One Law School’s Innovative Offerings. “Lawyers of the future, regardless of practice area, need to be proficient in legal technology.” Here’s what Hofstra Law’s doing about it. Check out the courses!

 

  • What’s Artificial About Ethical AI In The Legal Industry? Everything. “Lawyers are trained and have studied ethics. They must be utilized to succeed in creating ethical AI programs.” Here’s the post by Andy Neill of HighQ.

 

  • Lisa Morgan interviewed Joe Lynyak of Dorsey & Whitney and other experts for this postPrivacy Compliance May Get Tougher Soon. “Organizations have had a tough time trying to comply with the European Union’s GDPR and now they have to consider the potential effect of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).”

 

  • Calif. Looking to Tech to Increase Access to Justice. “How technology can increase access to justice while protecting the public is the focus of a newly appointed California Bar task force. The question is how the legal services industry can integrate new tech to become more efficient and responsive while avoiding ethical roadblocks against fee-sharing with non-lawyers and other arrangements.”

 

  • This, from Freshfields: People Analytics: The Opportunities and Legal Risks of a Brave New World. “Advances in technology and artificial intelligence are allowing companies to solve strategic issues in ever quicker, more innovative ways. These advances are just as applicable to people management. People Analytics is the application of digital tools and algorithms to data about or relating to people, including through profiling. The data that is collected, processed and interpreted by People Analytics tools can allow employers to make better HR decisions and run their businesses more efficiently through cost reductions and enhanced operational capabilities. In our briefing we discuss the benefits, the challenges and the legal risks associated with the use of People Analytics.”

 

  • Frances Wilding and James Ward of Haseltine Lake postedUK: Updated Guidelines For Examination At The EPO In Force 1 November 2018. “In the 2018 Guidelines, a group of sections relating to CII have been significantly revised and newly added: … New section added about the field of artificial intelligence and machine learning, aimed at better defining the criteria for their patentability (G II, 3.3.1).”

 

  • This, from Craig W. Adas and Alex Purtill of Weil Gotshal: Valuation Issues in Acquiring Artificial Intelligence Companies.

 

  • “Further, regarding emerging technology, 68% of solos and 72% of lawyers in firms with 2-9 attorneys report it is “very” or “somewhat” important to receive training and education on emerging technology like blockchain and artificial intelligence.” More from the annual ABA Legal Technology Survey Report here. (It’s huge.)

 

  • From Gwynne MonahanFalling for Legal Technology Recent updates and releases. “…(L)egal technology product updates and release announcements over the past month.” Just in case I missed something.

 

  • Press release: “Consilio, a global leader in eDiscoverydocument reviewrisk management, and legal consulting services, has announced it has acquired DiscoverReady, a premier eDiscovery, document review, and compliance solutions provider. The combined company will operate more than 70 offices, review centers, and data centers around the world in 11 countries. The company’s global operations will continue to serve investigation, litigation, and compliance matters of all sizes and complexities, anywhere in the world.:

 

  • Lawyers safe from brave new AI world… for now. “James Kwan, partner at Hogan Lovells, said there are ‘few laws’ that explicitly ban robots from being decision makers. He alluded to the Code of Civil Procedure in France, which makes references to arbitral decisions being made by a ‘person’, as one that does appear to reject the prospect. ‘Other laws may have implicitly excluded the possibility,’ he added. However, Kwan referenced proposals going through the European Parliament that would afford ‘legal status’ to robots and ensure that highly capable AI have recognised rights and responsibilities. ‘It’s amazing that we have even got to the point where we can have a discussion on this,’ Kwan said, adding: ‘I think lawyers are safe for the time being’.” Story here.

 

  • This, from Bernard MarrHow The UK Government Uses Artificial Intelligence To Identify Welfare And State Benefits Fraud. “Investment in data strategy, technologies that support machine learning and artificial intelligence, and hiring skilled data professionals is a top priority for the UK government. Ministers of the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) have rolled out and tested AI to automate claims processing and fight fraud within their department.”

 

  • Criminal justice system ‘really creaking’, warns outgoing CPS chief. “She would also see how technology can be improved to support everyone’s roles: ‘Digital forensics offer us valuable evidence in cases, but at the moment they simply take too long. And everything from faster Wi-Fi connections in court to the use of Artificial Intelligence could make everyone’s roles easier and the system faster and more effective for victims, witnesses and defendants.'” Story here.

 

  • “Charles Ciumei QC of Essex Court Chambers in London said the use of prediction tools “to assist human judicial decision making” was more achievable than “robot judges”.” Post here.

 

  • This, from Shanti Berggren of Optus Legal: Law, the digital age and change to come. “It is technology that facilitates our Optus Legal Team operating nationally allowing some of our lawyers to live and work away from our Sydney headquarters. In short, technology is changing legal culture and what it means to be a lawyer. But how should that change be managed?” The story has some answers.

 

  • Press release: Dentons Rodyk will use XION.AI’s deep learning bots as part of its wider technology initiative designed to enhance productivity and further innovate its legal service offerings in the region. It is part of the firm’s strategy to leverage on technology to optimise legal services for its clients.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:
    • AL Caffeine, Feat: Relativity, QDiscovery, Taylor Wessing, TLT, Luminance + AI Art. Post.
    • TL, DR: The 14 Key Lessons From Juro’s Legal Operations eBook. Post.

 

  • Not AI, but pretty cool tech: (New Zealand’s) TMJAM launches real time IPONZ trade-mark filings. “New law tech company TMJAM disrupts traditional intellectual property lawyering with an advanced platform allowing the public to file their own trade mark applications online.” Story here.

 

  • EPIC calls for US adoption of AI guidelines. “In its letter to the NSF, EPIC argues the principles match up well with AI strategies already laid out by the U.S. “By investing in AI systems that strive to meet the [universal] principles, NSF can promote the development of systems that are accurate, transparent, and accountable from the outset,” EPIC President and Executive Director Marc Rotenberg writes.” Full story here.

 

Blockchain

  • Here’s a collection of TED talks about blockchain.