It has been almost a week since my last post. The College of Law Practice Management‘s Futures Conference was awesome, but my absence means I’m going to have to break the latest news into two posts, with the second to follow Wednesday.

 

 

  • Above the Law, in partnership with RSM, has produced an eBook, Using Data Analytics to Combat Fraud. Here’s how to download your copy.

 

  • In this post from Information Age (Applying AI and ‘new maths’ to solve complex real-world challenges), James Loxam of Luminance discusses the challenges around the application of AI with special emphasis on Cybersecurity. “What we’re now seeing is the emergence of AI-powered technology which is reading and understanding contracts and documents in the same way a human can. Machine learning algorithms are giving the technology the ability to learn and teach itself from the data it is shown, without needing explicit programming. The technology is only as good as the human operating it, but it is fair to suggest that the human is no longer as good at their job without the technology.”

 

  • LexisNexis has released the results of a new survey: Legal Technology: Looking Past the Hype. Register for the report download here. The methodology description is sparse and not very clear, but I believe they conducted 30 in-depth interviews with in-house counsel and 110 responded to an online survey. Assuming no non-response bias (always a big assumption), the overall findings are probably accurate within about +/- 10 percentage points. (E.g., “37% of GCs do not know what technology their law firm is using” should be read as “between 27 and 47% …”) The breakdowns into respondent categories should be ignored.

There is some interesting third-party data reported. For instance, “Crunchbase estimates that over $1.5B has been invested by venture capitalists into legal start up. This number excludes private equity investments nor does it look at the money spent by law firms and larger corporates operating in this space.”

 

  • “Artificial Intelligence software provider, Neota Logic and leading law firm, McCann FitzGerald have announced a partnership with University of Limerick to deliver the first-ever third-level legal tech course from spring 2019. In what is a first for the legal industry and legal education in Ireland, students will have the opportunity to learn how to design, build and test digital legal solutions using the Neota Logic System, a no-code development platform for the automation of professional services.” Details here.

 

  • Press releaseUS service makes data available on 100,000 lawyers’ litigation history. “Bloomberg Law’s enhanced Litigation Analytics tool now enables users to search, review, and analyze company representation information for more than 100,000 attorneys at over 775 law firms.”

 

  • “(T)he French data protection authority, the CNIL, the European Data Protection Supervisor and Italian DPA, the Garante, co-authored a new declaration on ethics and data protection in artificial intelligence. Along with the declaration’s six principles, the ICDPPC, ‘in order to further elaborate guidance to accompany the principles,’ will establish “a permanent working group addressing the challenges of artificial intelligence development,” an ICDPPC release states.” Much more from The International Association of Privacy Professionals (iapp) here.

 

  • From DLA Piper‘s Ileana M. Blanco: Artificial Intelligence: from diagnostic programs to sex robots – unresolved liability questions. “No lawsuits involving AI have been found to date. It is foreseeable that traditional defenses – such as that there was no safer alternative design or that the product was “unavoidably unsafe” – may be available to potential defendants. This area of law remains unsettled – definitely one to monitor in the coming months and years.”

 

  • Here’s a post from Norton Rose announcing yet another enhancement to their chatbot, Parker. “Global law firm Norton Rose Fulbright has launched a new chatbot powered by artificial intelligence that has been trained to respond to queries in relation to emerging regulatory developments in the insurance sector. The chatbot is the latest iteration of the firm’s NRF Parker chatbot and will operate under the name of ‘Parker Insurance’. It is intended to help clients navigate new laws and regulations relevant to the insurance sector. Parker will continue to evolve and learn in order to develop its knowledge of the sector.”

 

 

  • This 40+ page white paper from Deutsche Bank (Regulation driving banking transformation) is an excellent case study of how today’s tech can transform an industry (banking being the industry in this example). There are chapters on Cloud, AI and Blockchain; and discussion of the state of regulation of each. “(T)the financial services industry will be transformed by technology. The extent to which this will happen, and the extent to which all participants experience the benefits, will depend on a wide range of factors. Regulation is almost certainly one of the most important.”

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

  • UK Well-Positioned To Compete with AI Superpowers US + China – Report. Story here.
  • SimpleLegal Launches ‘Auto Correct’ Billing App to Fix Dodgy Invoices. Details here.
  • Bloomberg Law to Offer Lawyer-Client Representation Analysis. Post here.
  • The Third Wave of AI, Big Data and the Dodo. More here.

 

Blockchain

  • Hunton Andrews Kurth posted this in-depth look at French Data Protection Authority (“CNIL”)’s initial assessment of the compatibility of blockchain technology with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). “In its assessment, the CNIL first examined the role of the actors in a blockchain network as a data controller or data processor. The CNIL then issued recommendations to minimize privacy risks to individuals (data subjects) when their personal data is processed using blockchain technology. In addition, the CNIL examined solutions to enable data subjects to exercise their data protection rights. Lastly, the CNIL discussed the security requirements that apply to blockchain.”

 

  • This post by Ron Friedmann presents John Alber’s interesting analogy between evolutionary biology and Blockchain. I found the closing paragraph especially useful: “How we record, transact and enforce agreements has been a constant almost since the inception of the common law. Yet we let the digital age be born and grow to maturity without ever considering that perhaps our paper‐bound and extraordinarily inefficient service model for managing agreements might need changing. It took computer scientists to reimagine how to make agreements concerning digital assets. With the digital age exploding around us, what else about the law needs reimagining? Everything? Where do we begin? What do we have to learn to continue to stay relevant? And does KM need reimagining too? Is it also a relic from another age?”