• This story has received VERY wide coverage, with headlines including:

Stephen Schwarzman Makes Anchor Gift For New $1 Billion School Of Artificial Intelligence At MIT;

MIT announces $1b outlay for study of artificial intelligence, computing; 

M.I.T. Plans College for Artificial Intelligence, Backed by $1 Billion;

MIT commits $1 billion to make AI part of every graduate’s education;

M.I.T. wants to build an AI-focused college using a ‘planned investment’ of $1 billion.

From Simpson Thatcher: “The Firm represented Blackstone Chairman and CEO Stephen A. Schwarzman’s foundation in connection with the foundation’s $350 million gift to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The gift is a portion of a $1 billion investment to establish a college for computing and artificial intelligence. The college, called the M.I.T. Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, will address the global opportunities and challenges presented by the prevalence of computing and the rise of artificial intelligence.”

Coverage herehereherehere and here.

 

  • William Hays Weissman of Littler postedWhy Robot Taxes Won’t Work. Several arguments to support the thesis are presented, including: “… from a tax administration perspective, robots pay no income tax because they do not earn income, pay no sales tax because they do not purchase items, and pay no property tax because they do not own anything”

 

  • Knobbe Martens publishedFDA Expresses Priorities for Clinical Trial Efficiency, Artificial Intelligence. “According to (FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.), clinical trials “are becoming more costly and complex to administer” while “new technologies and sources of data and analysis make better approaches possible.” In order to take advantage of these better approaches, Gottlieb pointed to the FDA’s Breakthrough Devices Draft Guidance, which proposes streamlined procedures to develop flexible clinical trial designs for important medical devices. This will allow the FDA to “evaluate . . . innovative devices more efficiently.” Six breakthrough devices have already been cleared using this program.”

 

  • From GoodwinTreasury Department Imposes Mandatory Filing Requirement on Parties to Certain Foreign Investments in U.S. Critical Technology Companies. “‘Emerging and foundational technologies’ soon to be controlled pursuant to a separate, interagency process underway and expected to target technologies not currently subject to ITAR or EAR controls, possibly including technologies relating to artificial intelligence, robotics, cybersecurity, advanced materials, telecommunications, and biomedicine, among others.”

 

  • From Osborne ClarkeShaping future competition law enforcement in digital markets | Furman review calls for evidence. “The first set of questions in the call for evidence asks about the substantive analysis of competition in digital markets and considers: … artificial intelligence tools and their impact on competition, including whether algorithmic pricing raises new competition concerns.”

 

  • Can artificial intelligence change construction? “As IBM’s Watson adds its computational power to construction sites, tech sees an industry in need of an upgrade.” “On especially complicated projects, Fluor (a global engineering and construction company) will begin using two new tools, the EPC Project Health Diagnostics and the Market Dynamics/Spend Analytics, to make sense of the thousands of data points found on a crowded construction site. Constant analysis will help forecast issues before they show up, and automate how materials and workers are distributed.” “Fortune found many tech firms investing billions in construction tech firms, including Oracle, which purchased Aconex for $1.2 billion in February, and Trimble, which bought Viewpoint for $1.2 billion in April.” Much more here.

 

  • Mintz publishedStrategies to Unlock AI’s Potential in Health Care, a Mintz Series. “The Journal of the American Medical Association in its September 18, 2018 issue included four articles on deep learning and Artificial Intelligence (AI). In one of several viewpoint pieces, On the Prospects for a (Deep) Learning Health Care System, the author’s conclusions aptly describe why health care providers, entrepreneurs, investors and even regulators are so enthusiastic about the use of AI in health care: Pressures to deploy deep learning and a range of tools derived from modern data science will be relentless, given the extraordinarily rich information now available to characterize and follow vast numbers of patients, the ongoing challenges of making sense of the complexity of human biology and health care systems, and the potential for smart information technology to support tomorrow’s clinicians in the provision of safe, effective, efficient, and humanistic care.”

 

  •  of Hunton postedLawyering Cashierless Technologies. “There is no doubt that there’s a revolution coming to the way consumers buy goods at brick and mortar stores as retailers seek to better meet customers’ need for speed and create novel shopping experiences. However, with this revolution comes new risks. There are a wide range of potential issues that retailers should consider before launching cashierless technology….”

 

  • Press releaseFirst-Ever Virtual Law Firm Puts Clients First. “By using Artificial Intelligence and robots, they’re (“2nd.law”) able to provide legal services for their clients at a steeply discounted price — up to 75% lower than the rates and fees that traditional firms offer — all while putting client relationships first.”

 

  • Lloyd Langenhoven of Herbert Smith Freehills posted this thoughtful piece: The symbiotic relationship between lawyer and legal tech. “Continued and efficient success for the legal profession, on both a macro and micro scale, lies in the ability of the profession to foster a symbiotic relationship between legal technology, client’s expectations and traditional legal knowledge. The future looks bright and exciting for the legal profession and it is about time our professional dusted the cobwebs off and donned a new, futuristic suit.”

 

  • This article from The Law Society Gazette frequently cites Brown Rudnick’s Nicholas Tse: IBA Rome: Artificial intelligence must mean strict liability – and higher insurance premiums. “‘The law needs to try not to multiply problems of dealing with AI and should not invest AI with legal personality,’ he told a session moderated by Law Society president Christina Blacklaws. ‘The work of the law is to try and be pragmatic, ensuring accountability while not stifling progress.’”

 

  • This from an associate at a major City law firm: “For at least a year I have been reading in the legal press how wonderful corporate law firms are with technology and how their pioneering work with artificial intelligence is unleashing a ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’/’profound paradigm shift’/’New Law 2.0 era’/insert buzz-term of choice that will fundamentally change the profession. But when I look around all I can see is some new laptops and phones given to us by our supposedly tech-savvy firms. This despite my own employer aggressively marketing itself as some kind of futuristic Silicon Valley-style start-up.”

 

  • From Lawyerist.comHow an Online Game Can Help AI Address Access to Justice (A2J). “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that the majority of those in possession of legal problems, remain in want of solutions.1 Also, ROBOTS!  Ergo, we should throw AI at A2J. There is considerably less consensus, however, on how (or why exactly) this should be done. But don’t worry! There’s an app/game for that, and it let’s you train artificial intelligence to help address access-to-justice issues.”

 

  • Holly Urban, CEO at EffortlessLegal posted: Artificial Intelligence: A Litigator’s New Best Friend? “This article is intended to help litigation attorneys looking to utilize AI to maximize their outcomes with minimal additional effort or expense.” In conclusion, like several before her, she reminds us: “As the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct states, ‘To maintain the requisite knowledge and skill, a lawyer should keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice, including the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology, engage in continuing study and education and comply with all continuing legal education requirements to which the lawyer is subject.'”

 

  • This story has been widely reported: Stephen Hawking feared race of ‘superhumans’ able to manipulate their own DNA. “Before he died in March, the Cambridge University professor predicted that people this century would gain the capacity to edit human traits such as intelligence and aggression. And he worried that the capacity for genetic engineering would be concentrated in the hands of the wealthy. Hawking mulled this future in a set of essays and articles being published posthumously Tuesday as ‘Brief Answers to the Big Questions….‘” “Once such superhumans appear, there are going to be significant political problems with the unimproved humans, who won’t be able to compete.” More coverage here and here.

 

From Artificial Lawyer:

 

  • Suffolk Law School Uses Reddit to Create Legal Question A2J Taxonomy. “A collaboration of Suffolk Law School’s Legal Innovation and Technology Lab in the US and Stanford Law School’s Legal Design Lab with funding from The Pew Charitable Trusts is taking legal questions from consumers posted on social media site Reddit, and using them to create a taxonomy of legal issues to help train A2J tech applications. Sounds unusual? At first it does, but when you look deeper it all makes sense. David Colarusso,  Director of Suffolk University Law School’s Legal Innovation and Technology Lab, explained to Artificial Lawyer what this is all about.” Here‘s the post.

 

  • I particularly enjoyed this opinion piece by the founder of Artificial Lawyer, Richard Tromans: The Politics of Legal Tech – Progressives vs Conservatives. “There are clearly then a wide range of views and goals when it comes to legal tech. We are not all on the same page. There are divisions. There are competing narratives. There is a battle of ideas to see which ones win out and different people, firms and organisations are arguing for different points of view. The legal tech world is, in a word, political.”

 

Blockchain

  • The state of blockchain: 11 stats. “How many CIOs are actively adopting or experimenting with blockchain? Dig into telling data from multiple sources.” Here’s the story from The Enterprisers Project.

  • This from Artificial Lawyer: Integra Ledger Launches Tools to Add Blockchain Tech to All Legal Software.