• This surprised me. I post a lot about Silicon Valley, Shanghai, London, etc. as AI hubs. Turns out NYC is doing pretty well. See this post (New York Is the Capital of a Booming Artificial Intelligence Industry) from Bloomberg. “If you’re looking to get into AI, set your sights on New York, according to the report. Surprisingly, New York—not San Francisco—boasts the highest percentage of AI and machine learning positions in a single metro area, with more than 11 percent of national job postings.”

 

  • AALL Annual Meeting Session Recap: Powered by AI, Built in the Law Library. “Fastcase CEO Ed Walters has had enough with the magic and the unicorns and the hype surrounding artificial intelligence, or AI.  He urged attendees at the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) session, “Powered by AI, Built in the Law Library,” to think of AI like pivot tables in Excel: they’re just tools. They’re not magic, but they can be to those who don’t understand them.” Good insights and examples in this piece.

 

  • The folks at Artificial Lawyer prepared this recapILTACon 2018 – Legal AI Comes of Age. “This time the most remarkable thing at ILTACon was how accepted it has all become, which in turn also signalled a far more mature understanding of the tech involved and the questions that needed to be grappled with. In short, the debate has moved on now to substantive issues around data quality needs for NLP training and real opportunities grounded in discussions around improvements to profit margins.” Definitely worth reading. (Blockchain is included.)

 

  • This summary (Changes to Law Firm Business Model Could Spur Innovation) of an ILTACON 2018 keynote panel includes some examples of modest inovation.

 

  • Also from ILTACON, via law.com, these four “Stories of Innovation: The Power of Personal Stories to Influence Behavior Change.” The examples are from Orrick, Troutman Sauders, Littler Mendelson, and Freshfields. Some funny, all interesting.

 

  • From Reed SmithProposed amendments to the ePrivacy Regulation. “The ePR will repeal and replace the Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive 2002/58/EC. The ePR will align Europe’s ePrivacy regime more closely with privacy regime set out in the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The GDPR took effect on 25 May 2018.” Amendments to three articles are discussed.

 

  • On Fridays, I try to provide some thought pieces and primer sorts of stuff. So, here’s Artificial intelligence definitions – upgrade your AI IQ, a good, pretty comprehensive, set of introductory definitions.

 

  • From Casepoint’s David Carns, here’s an interesting overview of the general implications of legal tech for “Law 3.0.” “(W)hile the Law 3.0 technology stack enables the digital transformation of real business processes and workflows, it does not replace those processes and workflows. It enhances them. It gives legal practitioners a big boost in speed and efficiency, but it will never replace the people who are practicing law.” Hmmm. Some might disagree.

 

Blockchain

  • “Commonwealth Bank of Australia and the World Bank have claimed the world’s first bond to be created, allocated, transferred, and managed via blockchain.” “According to CBA, the “$AUD Kangaroo bond”, Blockchain Offered New Debt Instrument (bond-i), which uses a private Ethereum blockchain, was created, allocated, transferred, and managed through its life cycle solely using distributed ledger technology. The two-year bond raised AU$110 million.” More here.

 

  • From Artificial LawyerPwC Legal Switzerland Joins the Global Legal Blockchain Consortium. “PwC Legal Switzerland has been exploring the impact of blockchain technology on various industries and ‘recognises the transformative potential of blockchain in the legal sector’.”

 

  • From Loeb & Loeb: Mini Law Lesson: What the Heck is Blockchain? It’s a five-minute video. (Focus on the content, not the production values.) Very high level.

 

  • Bob Ambrogi posted this Access-to-Justice news: Legaler Raises $1.5M To Build Blockchain To Help Bridge Justice Gap. Australia seems to do more than just about any other country re A2J tech.

 

  • Here’s Volume 34 of K&L Gates’ Blockchain Energizer. If you’re really interested in news about blockchain and law, you should be following these posts.

 

  • DWF’s Dominic Watkins contributed this brief post to the UK’s Food ManufactureLegal implications as blockchain disrupts food.