• Here’s a follow-up to yesterday’s deep dive into facial recognition. Following protests from “rights and privacy groups” such as the ACLU, Orlando Police End Test Of Amazon’s Real-Time Facial ‘Rekognition’ System.

And this post about smart cities (How Cities Are Getting Smart Using Artificial Intelligence) includes a few thoughts about AI, facial recognition and privacy. “There will be 50 billion devices connected by 2020 including a billion cameras–all feeding data to artificial intelligence platforms. Perhaps you’ve noticed the marked improvement in facial recognition on Facebook this year. Police in Shenzhen are already ticketing jaywalkers using facial recognition. We are approaching radical transparency where every search, every move, every test informs a merchant, authority, or insurer. Want to preserve any privacy? That will take some new policies.”

 

  • How ARM Is Using Artificial Intelligence To Supercharge Its Patents. “When it came to doing the due diligence on ARM’s patents, the usually long-and-labourious process that can last for weeks on end, sped through in just a couple of days. The reason was software powered by artificial intelligence that could read documents at light speed, compared to humans. Both Softbank and the law firm Slaughter & May, which represented ARM during the deal, used the same AI-based tool to trawl through both ARM’s and Softbank’s patent portfolios.” More here.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer:

– Legal Data Talent War Heats Up With Kennedys Hires.

– AI: Moving Legal Research + Innovation Forward. This post is a review of a presentation by Anand Upadhye of Casetext and Nina Jack of Fastcase. Among the comments, “By the end of 2019, Microsoft is aiming to move 90% of the company’s legal work to alternative fee arrangements.”

 

  • Lately, Above the Law has been more AI-focused than usual. Here are a couple such worthwhile posts:

– AI And The Practice Of Law: Realizing Value. “How does one reasonably prioritize and choose which projects to pursue and which vendors to work with?” This is not the only approach to such choices, but is one worth considering.

The Bleeding Edge Of Law: The long aversion to leveraging capital in law is changing fast. “(A)s a result of a number of factors — including the equity structure of law firms, the difficulty in measuring and quantifying legal risk, and the ability of underwriters to understand both finance and law — law had previously seemed immune to using capital as a force for positive change. That is changing fast, as capital is applied to litigation and a growing array of other areas of the law.” This is mainly a look back, but it sets the stage for profound change.

 

  • Blockchain – fFrom Perkins CoieBlockchain in Review – Weeks of May 7th through May 25th, 2018. Hearings in the House, before the Federal Reserve and SEC are reported.