• Here’s an interesting thought piece by Bruce Hambrett (Australian Chair of Baker McKenzie) and Professor Nick James (Executive Dean of Bond University’s Faculty of Law) from Australia’s Lawyers Weekly about the future of law, including law schools, law firms, and corporate legal departments. Reimagining the delivery of legal services in Australia — ‘The New Lawyers’. “First, the new delivery model will be underpinned by a culture of innovation. There will be no place for anything but a growth mindset. Second, there will be need for increased investment by law firms, not only in technology and artificial intelligence on a scale not yet seen, but also in their talent, because at the centre of the new legal service model will be the strategic legal adviser — The New Lawyers.”

 

  • This article from the ABA Journal makes a compelling argument for publicly available training datasets for developing legal AI solutions. Want to improve AI for law? Let’s talk about public data and collaboration.

 

  • This new law firm is all about Blockchain: “Launched in May, DLx Law is a law firm that is designed to align with the culture of blockchain and address legal issues arising from the technology’s use.” So far, it consists of two ex-Big Law partners, but they’re growing.

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer: UK Law Firm Wiggin Raises $21m Investment for Its AI-Driven IP Tool. “(T)he company will use the investment to accelerate the development of its Talisman online brand protection technology to help businesses safeguard their brands from counterfeit and piracy threats online. … Talisman monitors IP infringements by scouring the web in real time using machine learning technology, pulling in data from major platforms ranging from online marketplaces and social media through to websites and app stores.” More details here.

 

  • This post is right out of sci-fi, but also very realistic. Can AI Help Us Predict And Prevent Crimes In The Future? “It is clear that there is potential to use AI to predict and prevent crime. Unfortunately, the capabilities of these technologies are only as good as the data they rely on. When that data is incomplete, or is biased, the same issues that law enforcement and citizens face already tend to remain prevalent.”

 

  • “Artificial intelligence (AI) is set to “revolutionise” trademark prosecution and enforcement, according to Hogan Lovells’ latest brand benchmarking report, released yesterday.” Here is an overview, and here is a link to request the report.

 

  • Hogan warns that clients need to pay more attention to AI and other technologies or risk missing the time and cost saving benefits. There’s a lack of AI awareness says Asia Pacific practice head.

 

  • From FreshfieldsPeople Analytics: The Opportunities and Legal Risks of a Brave New World. “Advances in technology and artificial intelligence are allowing companies to solve strategic issues in ever quicker, more innovative ways. These advances are just as applicable to people management.”

 

  • Irish law firm William Fry’s Catherine O’Flynn and Darran Brennan authored Artificial Intelligence in the Workplace (Part 2): AI-Assisted Recruitment and Employment Equality Law. “While AI has been proven to improve the recruitment process for employers through efficiency, speed and the circulation of roles to a more diverse grouping of candidates, there is also potential for discrimination in AI-assisted recruitment.”

 

  • Toronto’s Aird Berlis publishes this interesting blog, including links to events and other blogs. Legal Tech and the Changing Legal Services Industry.

 

  • From Epstein Becker, “In this Thought Leaders in Health Law® video, Gail H. Javitt, Robert E. Wanerman, Joshua J. Freemire, and Alaap B. Shah, Members of the Firm in the Health Care and Life Sciences practice, discuss the legal implications and concerns that have arisen from the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) by the health care and life sciences industry.” It’s an interesting seven minutes.

 

  • Alex Eagle, an associate in Weil Gotshal’s London office, has these useful tips for lawyers trying to understand evolving legal tech and its implications. Navigating the brave new world of LawTech.

 

  • From The Washington Post, this is a pretty thorough discussion of the abilities of and concerns about Amazon’s facial recognition technology. The Cybersecurity 202: Lawmakers worry Amazon’s facial recognition tech could reinforce racial profiling.

 

  • There has been a great deal written lately about AI’s threat to the privacy and security of our homes. Here’s a much more positive post about the potential benefits of AI: Turn Your Home Into A Fortresses with Artificial Intelligence.