Happy GDPR day! I’m sure you’re getting plenty of news about it already, so I’ll try not to go there.

 

  • HT to Elonide Semmes for this, the Ad Age Year in AI Fact Pack. If you’re at all involved in advertising or branding, at least a skim will be worth your while.

 

  • From Holland & Knight: “Artificial Intelligence Rapidly Transforming South Florida Law Firms.” (Biz Journal subscription required.)

 

  • Mayer Brown has released, Technology Transactions: Thriving in an Age of Digital Transformation. Press release here. Link to request the guide here.

 

  • From the UK’s Joseph Hage Aaronson: Robotics and Tax Compliance. “From introducing digital tax accounts to creating a Digital Strategy, the goal is to help customers get their tax calculations right and make tax easier.”

 

  • Bernard Marr has another post about AI and law. Here’s How AI And Machine Learning Are Transforming Law Firms And The Legal Sector. “Now is the time for all law firms to commit to becoming AI-ready by embracing a growth mindset, set aside the fear of failure and begin to develop internal AI practices. There are many who believe innovation is the key to transforming the legal profession.” “It’s clear that AI and machine learning are already transforming law firms and the legal sector.”

 

  • Here’s a rather academic piece, Law and Autonomous Systems Series: Paving the Way for Legal Artificial Intelligence – A Common Dataset for Case Outcome Predictions, by Ludwig Bull (Scientific Director at CaseCrunch), an AI startup specializing in legal decision predictions and Felix Steffek (University Lecturer at the Faculty of Law and a Senior Member of Newnham College, University of Cambridge). “This article provides an overview of our current project, which aims to contribute to artificial intelligence (AI) research in law. We are preparing a standardised dataset of 100,000 US court cases to test AI approaches for analysing court decisions and predicting case outcomes.” “This article deals with three issues: What are the characteristics of the dataset, and what is the process of its creation? What are the benefits of our dataset for the research and application of AI in law? How can private actors, institutions, lawmakers and researchers put the dataset to good use?”

 

  • From Law.comWhat’s Next: Our Robot Overlords Should Be Regulated. “Litigators don’t usually draft legislation. But that isn’t stopping Bradford Newman, a Paul Hastings partner focusing on employment and trade secrets law, from putting forward a proposal to regulate artificial intelligence by taxing companies that benefit from AI and granting legal protections to machine-generated IP.”

 

  • Not a day goes by that I don’t see a post about the impact on AI on jobs. Trying to keep this blog fresh, I only post few of those. But it has been a while, so here (rather lengthy but good), here (tech-specific) and here (law-specific) are three with a bit of a fresh perspective.

 

  • Here I go citing Westworld again. This time it’s from a post by Adam R. Banner of Oklahoma Legal Group, a criminal defense law firm in Oklahoma City. He notes that “Under the terms of service in the HBO series, the fictional company operating the park, Delos Destinations, has the right to collect, control, and use guest saliva, blood and other ‘secretions and excretions.’ If that sounds fairly ominous, it’s because it most certainly is. Facebook’s terms of service (thankfully) pale in comparison to those of Delos as far as what the company can and can’t do with the personal data it collects on its users.”

 

  • Here‘s a real AI Friday thought piece from the “National Review,” Transhumanism: A Wail of Despair in the Night. “Its promise of a kind of immortality is an ersatz version of Christian hope for a resurrection in a glorified body.”