• As I was making an AI presentation earlier this week, I made my usual comments about this history of AI from mythology to Turing to the Dartmouth Conference and up to the present. A bit later I mentioned the news about Google Duplex. Then it clicked. Duplex may have just passed the Turing Test! (Not in terms of general AI, but certainly with narrow/vertical AI.) Judging from this post, it seems I’m not the only one to have made this connection.

 

  • This, from Michael Mills via “Law Practice Today”: Siri, Esq.—The AI Robots are (not) Coming. Michael divides AI into three sorts of knowledge and reasoning: semantic, logical and statistical. He then uses this taxonomy to organize a discussion of today’s use of AI in legal and to take a look into the future. (Spoiler: some legal jobs will be replaced.) Good stuff.

 

  • Jordan Furlong has prepared a very thoughtful piece titled, Thinking Differently about Legal AI. He briefly reviews the post by Michael Mills discussed above, then presents a “new framework” for dividing legal AI tasks into those concerned with “volume costs” versus those dealing with “scarcity costs.” It’s an interesting approach.

 

  • Here’s more such thinking about AI in legal from HighQ’s Andy Neill: Are robot lawyers the future?

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer: CLM Co. Apttus Partners with Legal AI Pioneer Kira Systems. “Apttus has all the legal data that clients send to it, Kira has the ability to really do something special with that legal data that is of value to the clients. In short, this makes a lot of sense.”

 

  • From CooleyAI’ll be back… EC strategy paper on AI targets liability and safety laws for further review. “The EC’s paper recommends further steps to prepare for the arrival of AI and ensure European leadership in the technology.”

 

 

  • India is trying to catch up with the US and China in AI. Here’s how, why and in what sectors. But, as this article shows, China is not about to be left behind.