• MUST Read. Of all the AI innovations in the legal industry to-date, this application of predictive analytics is my favorite. Kudos to DLA Piper! Data-Driven Client Retention Program Wins Fans at DLA Piper.

 

  • Who can own the copyright then a robot takes a selfie? Same for a monkey? Davies Collison Cave lawyers weigh in here. And more discussion here

 

  • From Bond Buyer: Orrick sees an AI advantage in public finance law. “With its recent expansion into Texas public finance, Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe is expected to extend its lead as the nation’s top bond and disclosure counsel this year. As it expands geographically, the law firm is also offering clients a growing array of tools that incorporate artificial intelligence and related technology.”

 

  • There’s a long-standing adage that legal innovation comes from the Big 4 (née Big 8), moves to the Magic Circle, then to America’s biggest “coastal” firms. Then maybe it finds its way to mid-sized firms in the “Heartland.” I expect there has been a lot of truth in that. But if the Heartland firms wait to see how all of those precursor steps play out before becoming involved in the current wave of tech innovation (e.g., AI), they are likely to be severely hurt, and not even know what hit them. For instance, if you’re doing quite well in your midwestern city, co-existing with relatively new offices of national firms (e.g., Greenberg Traurig or DLA), and those national players decide to launch an AI offering nationwide (or even globally), you could experience substantial client migration to “better, faster, cheaper,” and never know exactly what happened. This post by Bob Ambrogi taps into this idea from a different angle.

 

  • From Law.comUK Law Firms Struggle to Understand Financial Value of Legal Technology. “(A) survey, conducted by LexisNexis of 91 midlevel U.K. law firms with less than $35 million in annual revenue, found that 24 percent of respondents increased their tech spend by up to 10 percent over the past three years, though nearly all, 87 percent, believed their law firm technology contributed “some extent” to their firms profit growth.”