• Corporations are embracing AI. MIT’s Sloan Management Review reports that a recent survey of C-level decision makers at “nearly 60” (OK, not a great sample) Fortune 1000 or industry-leading companies, including American Express, Capital One, Ford Motors, Goldman Sachs, MetLife, Morgan Stanley, and Verizon, found that “an overwhelming 97.2% of executives report that their companies are investing in building or launching big data and AI initiatives.” If they’re that serious about AI, I imagine they would expect their law firms to at least be conversant in AI and its legal ramifications.

 

  • A2J: As part of a new class at SMU’s Dedman School of Law in Dallas, law students have created legal apps to help the clients of civil legal-aid providers. NEOTA Logic is being used to develop the apps. This story makes it clear that there are serious obstacles in getting from the concept to actual benefits to the end users, but it seems like a great learning experience — welcome to the real world.

 

  • AI and the EU, from Norton Rose Fulbright: “In a research paper published in Switzerland, it is argued that AI that enjoys legal personality under a member state’s national law can invoke freedom of establishment to have its personality recognised in other member states. A member state would also be prohibited from enacting legislation that curbs AI. This would essentially come down to ‘free movement of algorithms’. If one of the 28 EU member states does in fact grant some form of legal personality to AI, the potential effects will be vast as each of the other 27 would be obliged to recognise such legal personality, regardless of what their own domestic laws state.” “While no EU country currently recognises legal personality of robots, the European Parliament in 2016 issued an official request for the Commission to submit to the European Parliament an official proposal for civil law rules on robotics. The Commission has not yet submitted any proposal to Parliament. These developments indicate that the EU is starting to think about how to treat robots. While the immediate future of legal recognition of AI in the EU is unclear, it is certain that robots will not rust in peace.”

 

  • Deloitte’s Artificial Intelligence Center of Expertise has crafted these top ten lessons for successfully embracing AI within a company. They are consistent with what I have been recommending to law firms.

 

  • DLA Piper has joined several other firms reported here in offering a guide for GDPR preparation. Also from DLA, this guide to “blockchain: background, challenges and legal issues.”

 

  • It has been a while since I’ve posted about the determination of Russia and China to lead in the international AI race. So as not to lose track of this important trend, there’s this about China’s focus on AI research and this from Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle and Bay City Capital managing director David Beier on the US government’s ‘disconcerting nonchalance’.

 

  • Here’s a fun post from Verizon. (I’m surprised I’ve only mention them once before.) They list nine AI developments and rate each according to its place on a “novelty” <–> “utility” scale and in terms of its’ “Terminator” score.