• AI news from Manzama: Manzama Signals is ready for prime time. “Manzama Signals is our newest innovation designed to help firms leapfrog the competition by using proprietary algorithms to identify activities or indicators that may signal opportunities for law firms thereby helping legal professionals to better act upon opportunities. Signals employs data driven models to inform decision-making by identifying key indicators signaling that a company may have a need for legal services, or that trends are developing within industries which may lead to significant increases in the need for legal services within those industries.”

 

  • Here, from Amy Spooner, is an interesting discussion of investments in Alternative Legal Service Providers (ALSPs). I particularly like this quote: “Innovation is not occurring in law firms or legal departments, …(i)t’s occurring among the businesspeople who want to get around the legal department, and then it’s adopted by younger lawyers who recognize that it will make their lives easier. It’s almost got to overwhelm the powers-that-be before they officially endorse it.” And this one: “Lawyers shouldn’t cede that ground to vendors, computer scientists, or venture capitalists. They should embrace, own, create, and contribute to the development of tools that can make them better able to serve in whatever capacity they act as lawyers.” Ethics are touched on in the piece and there’s a pretty deep dive into the state of A2J.

 

  • In this piece, attorney Philip Segal has some good tips for lawyers beginning to work with AI tools, though he does underestimate AI’s ability to “guess” and “imagine.”

 

  • From Artificial Lawyer: “…Berwin Leighton Paisner has chosen litigation tech company Opus 2‘s electronic trial platform, Magnum. … (I)ts key benefit is that it allows parties involved in litigation to work together seamlessly, annotate documents, create hyperlinks between them and operate in a gated wholly digital space, which removes the need for huge paper bundles.”

 

  • Also from Artificial Lawyer, a deeper dive than my prior post into email (and other time spent on mobile devices) management tool Zero. “Boosting Law Firm Profits By Capturing Mobile Device Time”

 

  • IMHO, Salesforce (Einstein) has been the leading AI-enabled CRM platform for some time. Now they are partnering with IBM (Watson); they’re now “preferred providers” of/for each other. This press release doesn’t have a lot of specifics, so we’ll have to watch to see what really comes of the partnership.

 

  • Here’s a very brief but interesting overview of the industries to which Elon Musk is applying AI.

 

  • Welcome to the club: India and Japan have announced plans to collaborate in the development of military AI and robots. And here’s a rather deep dive into how AI is being used by the US military and beyond. How’s this for just a bit scary: “(c)yber- and electronic warfare-hardened, network-enabled, autonomous and high-speed weapons capable of collaborative attacks,” and “AI devices that allow operators of all types to ‘plug into and call upon the power of the entire Joint Force battle network to accomplish assigned missions and tasks.'”

 

  • Maybe not scary, but I find this useful advance in AI at least a bit creepy: “FDA Approves Artificial Intelligence That Can Predict Death.”

 

  • These 10 AI predictions for 2018 are more insightful than most — worth a quick read.

 

  • Perhaps I should have saved this little 150-pager from Microsoft for a weekend, but I didn’t want to wait. Here’s “The Future Computed, Artificial Intelligence and Its Role in Society.” “Law” is mentioned 93 times, looking back, discussing the present, and even forecasting a bit. Topics such as privacy, ethics, the need for regulation, jobs, anti-trust, liability, and data protection are covered. There’s a full chapter titled, “Principles, Policies and Laws for the Responsible Use of AI.” “The authors say, as I have time and again, smart lawyers will take up a new practice called “AI Law.”