• What’s Next by Ben Hancock promises to provide a regular update on the convergence of law and tech: 1) How the law is coping (or not) with technology; and 2) How technology is changing the practice of law. This post provides an overview of what’s to come.

 

  • From the UK’s Law Gazette: “Last week’s Alternative AI conference included sessions about the business value and pricing implications of introducing and implementing AI tools across professional services organisations. The debates raised questions about where to embark on a legal AI initiative, and the challenges of selecting from the mass of new products and services on offer (and in particular introducing technology that impacts on working practices).” Several law-related technologies are discussed in the post; be sure to see CheckRecipient and Clerksroom’s chatbot, Billy Bot, who works as a ‘trainee robot junior clerk’.

 

  • Blank Rome Partner Elaine D. Solomon serves on the Board of Editors of the new journal, ‘RAIL: The Journal of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence & Law’. In the inaugural edition Blank Rome attorneys Sean Pribyl and Alan Weigel provide a brief history of autonomous vessel operations and discuss advanced automation in shipping and the perceived benefits and risks of this emerging technology.

 

  • Financial Services: This article from Canada’s McCarthy Tétrault LLP is an overview of the Financial Stability Board (the “FSB”) report on the market developments and financial stability implications of artificial intelligence (“AI”) and machine learning in financial services. It also digs into the possible impact of AI on market stability and discusses legal and ethical issues.

 

  • Rhim Young-yik, an attorney with a background in brain science and mathematics is the chief executive of Intellicon Meta Lab, a Korean firm researching artificial intelligence. His company has developed U-Lex, a system that streamlines legal research. Rhim hopes U-Lex will put Korea on the map for “legal technology,” For now, it is only available in Korea.

 

  • In this post, radiologist Hugh Harvey discusses the possibility of patients making malpractice claims (even class actions) on the basis of tumors their doctors missed, but AI analysis of their scans undertaken by plaintiff’s lawyers could find. The title (Could Artificial Intelligence destroy radiology by litigation claims?) is a bit alarmist, but the possibility real.

 

  • Today, Artificial Lawyer announced: “(t)he world’s largest ever legal hackathon will take place next February and bring together as many as 10,000 lawyers, law students, tech companies and many others from around the planet’s legal ecosystem. The multiple teams will all have one aim: to build something great using legal technology.” Details here.

 

  • This rather technical (and extensively footnoted) article takes a deep dive into the convergence of blockchain and cryptocurrencies with AI. “Blockchain and AI are the two extreme sides of the technology spectrum: one fostering centralized intelligence on close data platforms, the other promoting decentralized applications in an open-data environment. However, if we find an intelligent way to make them working together, the total positive externalities could be amplified in a blink.”

 

  • This from bizjournals sounds interesting, but there’s a paywall. “COVER STORY: How artificial intelligence is changing the practice of law.”

 

 

  • Click here for a fun infographic from Adweek about the likely impacts of AI on marketing.

 

  • Google continues to make strides with AI teaching AI. Here’s the story. (Check out the embedded video about how Australia will begin to replace passports with facial recognition systems in 2018.)

 

  • Here are 13 other predictions as to where AI will take us in 2018.

 

  • More women and minorities are needed in AI. Here’s why. I expect AI4All may help.