• Here’s an interesting news site from the Legal Innovation Centre at Ulster University; lots of Legal Tech news.

 

  • “Zero” is a new AI-driven email service for law firms. From their home page: “Zero uses state of the art A.I. technologies to make attorneys more productive and provide custom e-mail usage experience for the users of the organization.” “Zero automatically tracks time spent on mobile email and provides daily reports with logged activity or exports the data into the billing system.” An important differentiator is that the AI capability is all on the phone itself, “making it completely secure.” (Judging from their home page, they need to decide whether they’re “zero,” “Zero” or “ZER0.” They’re not “ZERO.”)

 

  • Jones Day has posted coverage of Italy’s “Anti-Raider Rules to Protect Strategic Assets.” (Their post is similar to the one Hogan Lovells promptly posted more than a month ago.) The decree, “(a)dded high-tech companies (e.g., those dealing with data storage and processing, artificial intelligence, robotics, semiconductors, dual-use technology, and space/nuclear technology) to the industries that are subject to the golden powers.”

 

  • In this LinkedIn post, K&L Gates Australian IP lawyer Sophie Taylor discusses “Machines with Moral Compasses — The Ethics of Driverless Cars,” and AI’s “moral compass.”

 

  • From India, LegitQuest: “New artificial intelligence enables user to browse court cases in seconds.” “With the help of deep learning and natural language processing, users can cull out the issues, facts, arguments, reasoning, and the decision of all judgements of the of India since 1950.” “One would be able to see the treatment of case law condensed in the form of graphics and can map the treatment of being relied on, distinguished, overruled etc up to the latest case law.”

 

  • Here, from Kira Systems’ Noah Waisberg are “Seven Articles Help Understand AI Can Transform Legal Practice.” I have posted most of these before, but they’re still fresh and useful, and this is a good chance to make sure you didn’t miss any.

 

  • Here, very briefly, are Richard Susskind’s latest thoughts about AI and the law.

 

  • Using AI (a neural network and machine learning), “(y)our Apple watch may soon be able to warn you of a coming stroke.” Details here.