• This post from “legal automation provider,” Plexus exposes much of the hype associated with AI in legal (largely because of systems masquerading as AI that aren’t really), but predicts that, “in the short-term, clients should expect to be disappointed by promises of A.I. In the long term, they should expect to be astounded.”

 

  • Orrick has announced “the formation of Orrick Labs, a dedicated in-house team of technologists focused on accelerating the development of leading-edge and innovative legal service solutions.” Finally, an AI ‘skunkworks.’ I believe this is the best way to start implementing AI and related technologies in a law firm.

 

  • In this post from Morgan Lewis, the authors summarize a recent report by the Gartner Blog Network explaining several impediments to successful AI implementation in business.

 

  • On November 30, Finnegan will be hosting a webinar titled, “Artificial Intelligence (AI) and IP: Forward-Looking Strategies.”

 

  • Australia’s Allens has selected iManage as their Work Product Management tool. Reasons cited include need for a system that can “access to prior work product through advanced search and AI technology,” and “the integration with RAVN Systems.”

 

  • Here’s an interesting interview by Artificial Lawyer of Kerry Westland, Addleshaw Goddard‘s new Head of Innovation and Legal Technology discussing her new role and how the firm continues to evolve its approach to the use of legal tech, including AI.

 

  • Artificial Lawyer also reports that New Zealand’s Chapman Tripp “has selected Luminance’s legal AI doc review capability for due diligence work in domestic and international M&A transactions. It has also launched a new dedicated legal tech as a service platform for its clients.”

 

  • In this paper, Florian Möslein of Universität Marburg (Institut für Handels- und Wirtschaftsrecht), Munich Center on Governance, discusses the history and future of AI in the boardroom, beginning in 2014 with Deep Knowledge Ventures, a Hong Kong based venture capital firm, appointing an algorithm named Vital (Validating Investment Tool for Advancing Life Sciences) to its board of directors.

 

  • The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has established a new data analytics unit to help crack down on the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence in price-fixing which will hold Australian businesses liable and responsible for the actions of their algorithms by enforcing competition laws in relation to the use of big data and computer algorithms, thanks to this new data.

 

  • iManage will hold an EMEA CIO briefing in London on 6th December featuring sessions on security and AI with the CIOs of several Magic Circle Firms presenting on the challenges the industry faces, as well as sessions on moving to the iManage Cloud and Work 10. For details: Leyton.Austin@iManage.com

 

  • This post by Conrad Karageorge, managing director of legal analytics start-up Jurimetrics presents “5 ways that big data (and AI) can build law firm value.” (He’s quite optimistic.)

 

  • Here are some ideas as to how small businesses (e.g., small firms) can use AI in various aspects of their enterprises.

 

  • Here are some informed guesses as to AI’s uses over the next few years.

 

  • Boy, could I use this! “Researchers at University of Southern California have developed a brain implant that can improve short-term memory by roughly 15 percent and working memory by 25 percent….” Potential applications include dementia and Alzheimer’s.

 

  • A robot failed China’s medical exam miserably, scoring 100 of a possible 600 (with 300 passing); “then knuckled down, absorbing the contents of dozens of medical textbooks, 2 million medical records, and 400,000 articles to develop the kind of reasoning needed to be a doctor.” It then scored 456 in fraction of the allowed time to complete the test. “More than half of the questions in the test are about [patient] cases….”  “So it’s impossible to purely rely on memorising and searches.”