• According to Artificial Lawyer, there’s yet another new player in the smart contracts space: Ireland-based Confideal.

 

  • This is a short but interesting discussion of “robo-justice,” the use of AI in administering the law and A2J.

 

  • Still more on facial recognition. It seems to be coming to police dash cams and body cams. Seems to me that every new application has the potential to generate legal work (often IP, litigation and transactions). And for the technically inclined, here’s an overview of how facial recognition works.

 

 

 

  • Speaking of “government,” this 7-minute interview of Michaela Ross of Bloomberg provides an update on US government regulation of drones and autonomous vehicles. We seem to be on a fast track to self-driving passenger vehicles (not necessarily commercial vehicles) nationwide. And this post warns that excessive regulation may “stifle innovation.”

 

  • The Partnership on AI was founded in 2016 to promote the belief that AI technologies hold great promise for raising the quality of people’s lives, the Partnership on AI and its members aim to recommend best practices and conduct and publish research under an open license in areas such as ethics, fairness and inclusivity; transparency, privacy, and interoperability; collaboration between people and AI systems; and the trustworthiness, reliability and robustness of the technology. Founding members include Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google/DeepMind, IBM and Microsoft. Accenture recently signed up through its #AI4Good initiative. I wonder if this might be an opportunity for a law firm; they would certainly be in the company of thought leaders.

 

 

  • And if you happen to be an AI specialist, holy cow! According to yesterday’s NYT, “typical A.I. specialists, including both Ph.D.s fresh out of school and people with less education and just a few years of experience, can be paid from $300,000 to $500,000 a year or more in salary and company stock….” Here’s one such job posting.

 

  • Meanwhile, a survey of 260 large organizations that operate globally, conducted by Vanson Bourne on behalf of Teradata, reports that among those global players “80 per cent of enterprises are investing today in AI,” and “one in three … believe their company will need to invest more over the next 36 months to keep pace with competitors.” “The industries where respondents expect to see the most impact from AI are IT, technology and telecoms (59%), business and professional services (43%) [law firms?], and customer services and financial services were tied for third (32%).

 

 

  • Not exactly Artificial Intelligence, but AI fear monger (too harsh?) Elon Musk has announced that Tesla’s Model 3 will automatically know where to take you without you asking. It will connect to your calendar. When a Twitter user suggested it would be relatively simple to sync your calendar to the car’s Autopilot system, Musk added: “Yeah, don’t exactly need to be Sherlock Holmes.”

 

  • The College of Law Practice Management’s 2017 Futures Conference is sold out, but you can follow on Twitter at #CoLPM.

 

  • Scientific American, Time and now The New Yorker (see above) have recently had AI covers. The New Yorker has a long article titled “Welcoming Our New Robot Overlords.” It’s about robots, automation and jobs. In almost ten thousand words manages to mention AI per se only twice.