• There’s AI-related work afoot in the US Congress:

Yesterday, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation’s Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet, met to discuss advancements in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, “to discuss the new and emerging role of AI in the nation’s growing digital environment.” Among the issues discussed were: threats to jobs, workforce diversity, bias, weapons, anticompetitive business, consumer safety, the ‘black box’ nature of AI (lack of transparency), lack of applicable laws and regulations, and developments in other nations (especially China). Details here.

A new bill (pdf) drafted by Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA) (‘‘Fundamentally Understanding the Usability and Realistic Evolution of Artificial Intelligence Act of 2017’’ or the ‘‘FUTURE of AI Act of 2017’’) asks the Department of Commerce to establish a committee on artificial intelligence to advise the federal government on how AI should be implemented and regulated. The bill includes five definitions of AI. Discussion here, and here’s the bill. Congressmen Ted W. Lieu (D-CA), John Delaney (D–MD) and Pete Olson (R–TX) introduced a companion bill in the House.

 

  • According to Bob Ambrogi, for 2017, “The Legal Technology Word Of The Year Is …” (I disagree a bit, as you might expect.)

 

  • Artificial Lawyer reports that, “UK law firm, TLT, has … entered into a strategic, multi-year partnership with Pittsburgh-based legal AI company LegalSifter, which includes a minority equity share in the US business.”

 

  • Norton Rose Fulbright today announced the launch of “Parker”, the first Australian law firm chatbot to respond on privacy law, powered by artificial intelligence.

 

  • “A Working List of Things Accounting Firms Will Be Fretting About in 2018.” I expect pretty much the same for law firms.

 

  • Here’s Major, Lindsey & Africa’s “2018 Industry Outlook.” Among the predictions, generally “uneven footing,” and “(g)reat opportunities … for those who are willing to adapt to the evolving needs of the profession and the changing conditions of the marketplace.” Most interesting: “(w)hile ominous predictions hint at AI ultimately replacing lawyers, this is far from reality. Instead, AI combined with personnel will make way for a supercharged lawyer.”

 

  • More prognostications (nothing earth shattering): “5 Artificial Intelligence Predictions For 2018.”

 

  • This report looks a bit further down the road: “Gartner Says By 2020, Artificial Intelligence Will Create More Jobs Than It Eliminates.”
  • In this piece, Frost Brown Todd LLC‘s Jane Hils Shea provides a good overview of some of the cybersecurity and privacy concerns generated by consumer-facing AI (e.g., autonomous vehicles and children’s toys).

 

  • I love this idea from Artificial Lawyer — a law firm seconding an associate to an AI firm.

 

  • I agree with this post by EY’s Chris Mazzei and Nigel Duffy (Global Innovation AI Leader) in which they discuss the risk of and barriers to businesses’ adoption of AI, and posits that “(t)he biggest risk is non-adoption.” Duffy says, “AI is likely to create winners and losers, and those who start adopting the technology early stand to be at a significant advantage.”

 

  • From Finance Monthly, “With the introduction of blockchain technology and the implementation of the token economy, Gary McKay, CEO and founder of APPII, believes the 4th industrial revolution is about to take place, potentially in the coming year.”

 

  • This is so 2018 — an online app store where all of the apps are AI-related and the transactions are conducted in cryptocurrency.

 

  • Here’s is a very interesting essay by Carlos E. Perez about AI’s facility with intuition, a capability impossible with rules-based systems.

 

  • And following up on yesterday’s post about Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), this article by  digs into the possibilities of AI being self-aware (i.e., conscious). Very interesting. (Time for some quantum physics!)

In this related interesting piece, Daniel Shapiro, PhD argues that AGI is really not much of an existential threat, at least for a while.

  • In this post, Tom Lingard (Partner) and Camille Arnold (Trainee) at Stevens & Bolton discuss the state of AI IP regulation in the UK (especially copyright). Bottom line, regulation significantly trails technology, and needs to catch up. (Same in the US.)

 

  • Artificial Lawyer reports that: “Legal AI company Seal Software has formed a joint venture partnership with global procurement and supply chain management consultancy State of Flux, to better help mutual clients extract value from supplier contracts and handle GDPR data compliance issues.” Details here.

 

  • Also from Artificial Lawyer: “Swedish law firm MAQS Advokatbyrå has chosen legal AI company Luminance for its M&A due diligence work as the uptake of AI systems across the Nordics accelerates.” “…MAQS was able to reduce a week-long manual review process to two hours. As a result MAQS has chosen to permanently adopt Luminance’s platform.”

 

  • Six tips for executives re getting started with AI. They all apply to law firms.

 

  • Here are some cool infographics about the predicted use of AI in various industries and countries (legal is not mentioned).

 

  • It seems we still need humans to review social media content. I posted earlier that Facebook is hiring thousands to help screen content and now Google reports that it will hire up to 10,000 in 2018 to manually screen YouTube videos. That’s not to say that AI can’t help: “In addition, the company plans to continue using machine learning to help supervisors eliminate almost five times more videos than they would be able to do so by reviewing manually. According to YouTube, the content it reviewed and identified algorithmically would have required the supervision of 180,000 people working 40 hours a week.”

 

  • In the spirit of “fair and balanced” reporting, here’s a post that is not nearly as optimistic and many I have cited as to how soon Artificial General Intelligence will surpass human intellect. (Or, if you see AI as an existential threat to humanity, “pessimistic.”) Note: Almost all of the data cited here is from 2012 or before, and AI progress has certainly accelerated since then. Here’s a more in-depth discussion of AGI.

 

  • In this sponsored piece from Artificial Lawyer, Kira presents three use cases for it’s AI-based solutions: Brexit, GDPR and IFRS 16.

 

  • Compliance: the growing threat from money laundering and terrorist financing has required anti-money laundering legislation to become more stringent worldwide. AI can be a major part of the solution as it is able to search for unstructured data in the Deep Web and across languages much better, faster and cheaply than humans.

 

  • Squire Patton Boggs has advised Appen Limited (developer of high-quality, human-annotated datasets for machine learning and artificial intelligence) in debt financing associated with its acquisition of Leapforce, Inc. and RaterLabs, Inc.

 

  • There’s a LOT of M&A and IP legal work being generated by the big AI players, and in this article Annie Palmer expects much more to come. As I have said before, the smartest law firms should be considering use of AI in practice of law, in their businesses, and possibly establishing an AI industry group to serve the dispute, deal and IP work being generated by this industry.

 

  • New for the 2018 CES show will be the “Artificial Intelligence Marketplace.” “the destination for the latest innovations in AI infrastructure and computer systems able to perform human-intelligence tasks.”

 

  • Google’s DeepMind has recently proven to be the master of board games “generally.” Just give it the rules and it will beat all computer and human challengers — with no training. While this may be an important step toward the holy grail of General AI, Oren Etzioni, head of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, who called this an “impressive technical achievement” echoed the words of Hamlet: “There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in DeepMind’s philosophy.” To put it another way: the Google subsidiary has made a name for itself by beating humans at board games, but it is important to keep things in perspective.

 

  • News you can use: Check out the tips at iPhone J.D. My favorite of these is the text replacement feature; I type “millc” on my iPhone or iPad, and “Market Intelligence LLC” appears.

 

  • It’s Friday, so here’s a thought piece. One of the biggest criticisms of AI is it’s ‘black box” nature. That is, we know AI systems can be extraordinarily effective in making good predictions, but the inherent nature of its algorithms (e.g., neural networks) makes it very difficult to understand how and why those predictions are made. I have recently posted a couple of articles about using AI to better understand the decisions made by AI. (Is you head spinning yet?) Anyway, this article goes into some of the reasons it’s important for us to understand the how & why of AI decisions. (Not to mention the need for courts to have these questions answered when assigning liability.)

 

  • And here’s one of my favorite topics for your weekend cogitation. Can AI be conscious?
  • These are solid for any marketer, even legal! “Get Smarter With Artificial Intelligence: 11 Ways Marketers Can Leverage AI.” (Nadja Blagojevic of Axoim even participated.)

 

  • Artificial Lawyer reports that Pittsburgh-based legal AI doc review provider “LegalSifter has secured $1.86 million in funding from venture capital fund Birchmere Ventures and several high-net-worth individuals.”

 

  • Epstein Becker partner Bradley Merrill Thompson, was quoted in the Bloomberg BNA Medical Devices Law & Industry Report, in “Who Is Liable for Faulty Artificial Intelligence in Health Care?” by Sara Merken.

 

  • Here are “five legal tech apps disrupting the legal market,” a good summary of the offerings of:
    • CaseCrunch (AI software that can predict legal decisions with high accuracy),
    • Premonition, (which lawyers, win which cases, in front of which judges),
    • Cognitiv+ (monitor changes in legislation and then compare its analysis to a company’s own contracts),
    • Check Recipient (studies your emails and alerts the user when it believes an email has made its way to the wrong person, blocking the attempt), and
    • FLEXEBOSS (online legal marketplace which enables people to search, select and interact with high quality, affordable (20% cheaper than the market rate), vetted UK solicitors to solve their legal issues).

 

  • I have often posted about the international competition to lead in AI, both commercially and militarily. Some of those participating in The Neural Information Processing System (NIPS) conference in Long Beach expect that the US lead may be vulnerable and is threatened by policies such as the tax plan now working its way through Congress. “I’m with everyone else—this is devastating,” says Erik Brynjolfsson, a professor at MIT’s Sloan School of Management who is studying the impact of AI on economic growth and inequality. “It’s honestly like it was designed by America’s enemies who want to take us down a notch. American policy is contributing to having AI research leave the country, literally.”

 

  • The ladies have justly received the Time POY award, but “Artificial Intelligence” has been chosen as the “marketing word of the year,” according to the Association of National Advertisers. (Voting was conducted online the week of Nov. 27 with 403 ANA members participating.) “It’s not just the marketing word of the year,” one advertiser said in verbatim comments selected by the ANA. “It’s the transformative phenomenon that’s going to reshape the world as we now know it.”

 

  • Reinforcement learning has done it again. AlphaGo Zero, developed by Google subsidiary DeepMind, only needed four hours of training to defeat the current world champion chess-playing program, Stockfish 8. Out of 100 games, it won 28 and drew the remaining 72. Even more impressively, it achieved this feat almost completely autonomously. “The AI was given a few basic rules, such as how the different chess pieces move, but was programmed with no other strategies or tactics. It simply got better by playing itself over and over again at an accelerated pace….”

 

  • AI News you can use! “Five New AI-Powered Features In Google Sheets Help Businesses Make Better Decisions.” For instance: “Using the ‘Explore’ feature, Sheets will intelligently suggest the right pivot table for you based on the data you have in a spreadsheet. What used to take six or seven steps to look at massive amounts of data (if you knew what you were looking for) just became as easy as clicking a button to visually represent data.”
  • The Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet, will convene a hearing titled “Digital Decision-Making: The Building Blocks of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence,” at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, December 12, 2017. The hearing will examine the benefits of artificial intelligence (AI) in today’s digital economy, the development of algorithms powering AI, and what practices are in place or should be in place to ensure proper use of this technology.

 

  • Here’s the final installment of Thomson Reuters’ series about the use of AI by in-house counsel. “Part IV: AI ADOPTION AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR IN-HOUSE.” It includes a discussion of ethics and ‘what to do.’ Good stuff.

 

  • In this six-minute video, Erin Hawley, vice president of public sector at Data Robot and Dan Conrad, federal chief technology officer at One Identity, discuss the potential application of artificial intelligence in the government background investigations process.

 

  • Speaking of law enforcement, here’s a “Handbook of Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems in Law Enforcement.”

 

  • This rather lengthy article does a good job of describing various scenarios in which harm may be caused by AI but the assignment liability is unclear. Interesting read. Again, the tech is way ahead of the laws and regulations.

 

  • Here’s a bit more about the need for healthcare-related AI regulation from Geoffrey Hinton, VP with Alphabet’s Google, at a Reuters Newsmaker event in Toronto on Monday.

 

 

  • Artificial Lawyer recently had rather in-depth discussion with iManage’s VP of Strategy, Peter Wallqvist. The merger with RAVN has provided a trove of NLP training data from 3500 clients which will lead to sophisticated products to come. (Related: UK law firm Stone King has selected iManage for document and email management.)

 

  • Michael Dell takes the anti-Musk, pro-AI side of the existential AI debate. “There’s all sorts of scary scenarios — science fictions movies, those sorts of things — but when you look at the actual results, it’s been way way more positive for humans than anyone would have predicted,” said Dell during a conference sponsored by software company Pivotal. “I think that will continue.”

 

  • What’s Next by Ben Hancock promises to provide a regular update on the convergence of law and tech: 1) How the law is coping (or not) with technology; and 2) How technology is changing the practice of law. This post provides an overview of what’s to come.

 

  • From the UK’s Law Gazette: “Last week’s Alternative AI conference included sessions about the business value and pricing implications of introducing and implementing AI tools across professional services organisations. The debates raised questions about where to embark on a legal AI initiative, and the challenges of selecting from the mass of new products and services on offer (and in particular introducing technology that impacts on working practices).” Several law-related technologies are discussed in the post; be sure to see CheckRecipient and Clerksroom’s chatbot, Billy Bot, who works as a ‘trainee robot junior clerk’.

 

  • Blank Rome Partner Elaine D. Solomon serves on the Board of Editors of the new journal, ‘RAIL: The Journal of Robotics, Artificial Intelligence & Law’. In the inaugural edition Blank Rome attorneys Sean Pribyl and Alan Weigel provide a brief history of autonomous vessel operations and discuss advanced automation in shipping and the perceived benefits and risks of this emerging technology.

 

  • Financial Services: This article from Canada’s McCarthy Tétrault LLP is an overview of the Financial Stability Board (the “FSB”) report on the market developments and financial stability implications of artificial intelligence (“AI”) and machine learning in financial services. It also digs into the possible impact of AI on market stability and discusses legal and ethical issues.

 

  • Rhim Young-yik, an attorney with a background in brain science and mathematics is the chief executive of Intellicon Meta Lab, a Korean firm researching artificial intelligence. His company has developed U-Lex, a system that streamlines legal research. Rhim hopes U-Lex will put Korea on the map for “legal technology,” For now, it is only available in Korea.

 

  • In this post, radiologist Hugh Harvey discusses the possibility of patients making malpractice claims (even class actions) on the basis of tumors their doctors missed, but AI analysis of their scans undertaken by plaintiff’s lawyers could find. The title (Could Artificial Intelligence destroy radiology by litigation claims?) is a bit alarmist, but the possibility real.

 

  • Today, Artificial Lawyer announced: “(t)he world’s largest ever legal hackathon will take place next February and bring together as many as 10,000 lawyers, law students, tech companies and many others from around the planet’s legal ecosystem. The multiple teams will all have one aim: to build something great using legal technology.” Details here.

 

  • This rather technical (and extensively footnoted) article takes a deep dive into the convergence of blockchain and cryptocurrencies with AI. “Blockchain and AI are the two extreme sides of the technology spectrum: one fostering centralized intelligence on close data platforms, the other promoting decentralized applications in an open-data environment. However, if we find an intelligent way to make them working together, the total positive externalities could be amplified in a blink.”

 

  • This from bizjournals sounds interesting, but there’s a paywall. “COVER STORY: How artificial intelligence is changing the practice of law.”

 

 

  • Click here for a fun infographic from Adweek about the likely impacts of AI on marketing.

 

  • Google continues to make strides with AI teaching AI. Here’s the story. (Check out the embedded video about how Australia will begin to replace passports with facial recognition systems in 2018.)

 

  • Here are 13 other predictions as to where AI will take us in 2018.

 

  • More women and minorities are needed in AI. Here’s why. I expect AI4All may help.

 

  • Artificial Lawyer reports that PactSafe ” is developing novel ways of signing legal documents including a ‘smile to sign’ application that uses facial recognition.” “The application, which also works on mobile devices, allows businesses to send contracts over text message, giving people the ability to then sign by return via a text message by simply replying ‘I Agree’.” Much more here.

 

  • I’ve mentioned document management provider iManage (they’ve gone well beyond that initial category) several times in my posts. Yesterday they were recognized for their good work: “iManage, the company dedicated to transforming how professionals work, announced it was named Technology Supplier of the Year at the British Legal Awards ceremony this evening in London. This award honors the contribution suppliers make to improving the delivery of legal services.”

 

  • Here’s an interesting question re IP: “Could intelligent machines of the future own the rights to their own creations?” Paresh Kathrani Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Westminster weighs in here. The answer is a bit complicated.

 

  • Still more from the UK: Sir Geoffrey Vos, chancellor of the High Court said in a speech forecasting the spread of online dispute resolution and ‘smart contracts’ based on blockchain encryption, that “judges will need to learn about computer code to handle disputes.” He also stressed the importance of online justice in maintaining the credibility of the courts. “We will need to move fast to develop online dispute resolution and other forms of speedier alternative dispute resolution, before the millennials lose faith in the way the older generation is content to deliver justice.”

 

  • Danish law firm Bech Brunn took advantage of their presence at the IBA conference in Sydney to conduct a survey of 52 firms from 17 countries on their use of AI. “The survey showed that artificial intelligence technology has already been implemented by several law firms around the world, and that it is considered significant to the future practice of law.” Details from this informal polling here.

 

  • In AI, so much is changing so fast. This post describes a course offering at MIT that combines hardware and software design to facilitate fast and efficient AI.

 

  • Here’s an interesting news site from the Legal Innovation Centre at Ulster University; lots of Legal Tech news.

 

  • “Zero” is a new AI-driven email service for law firms. From their home page: “Zero uses state of the art A.I. technologies to make attorneys more productive and provide custom e-mail usage experience for the users of the organization.” “Zero automatically tracks time spent on mobile email and provides daily reports with logged activity or exports the data into the billing system.” An important differentiator is that the AI capability is all on the phone itself, “making it completely secure.” (Judging from their home page, they need to decide whether they’re “zero,” “Zero” or “ZER0.” They’re not “ZERO.”)

 

  • Jones Day has posted coverage of Italy’s “Anti-Raider Rules to Protect Strategic Assets.” (Their post is similar to the one Hogan Lovells promptly posted more than a month ago.) The decree, “(a)dded high-tech companies (e.g., those dealing with data storage and processing, artificial intelligence, robotics, semiconductors, dual-use technology, and space/nuclear technology) to the industries that are subject to the golden powers.”

 

  • In this LinkedIn post, K&L Gates Australian IP lawyer Sophie Taylor discusses “Machines with Moral Compasses — The Ethics of Driverless Cars,” and AI’s “moral compass.”

 

  • From India, LegitQuest: “New artificial intelligence enables user to browse court cases in seconds.” “With the help of deep learning and natural language processing, users can cull out the issues, facts, arguments, reasoning, and the decision of all judgements of the of India since 1950.” “One would be able to see the treatment of case law condensed in the form of graphics and can map the treatment of being relied on, distinguished, overruled etc up to the latest case law.”

 

  • Here, from Kira Systems’ Noah Waisberg are “Seven Articles Help Understand AI Can Transform Legal Practice.” I have posted most of these before, but they’re still fresh and useful, and this is a good chance to make sure you didn’t miss any.

 

  • Here, very briefly, are Richard Susskind’s latest thoughts about AI and the law.

 

  • Using AI (a neural network and machine learning), “(y)our Apple watch may soon be able to warn you of a coming stroke.” Details here.