• In his abstract, David Barnhizer, author of this 35-page (and 85 footnotes) somewhat academic piece on Legal AI, describes it as a “brief look at the effects of technological development on law jobs and law schools.” I suppose we each have our own definition of “brief.” Nonetheless, this is a solid/balanced overview of AI generally, and especially as related to the legal industry. His warnings about the general impact of AI are backed up and he provides several fresh perspectives (e.g., we are at the moment of “peak human”). How fast is change coming? “Very fast, with lightning speed, beyond anyone’s rational projections.”

 

  • This article about Legal AI draws an interesting distinction between what it calls “commercial AI” and “institutional AI.” It also distinguishes between AI as an aid to decision-making and as an aid to process automation. It concludes by rightly calling AI a “competitive necessity.”

 

  • Singapore law firm Wong Partnerships “has adopted technology from London-based AI firm Luminance, to support the Corporate/M&A practice which is actively engaged in numerous transactions in Singapore (and across ASEAN and the Middle East).”

 

  • Yesterday I posted two interesting articles about Estonia’s focus on AI. Now their legislature is working on giving AI legal status, creating “robot-agents.”

 

  • In this post, DLA Piper’s Giangiacomo Olivi, Gareth Stokes and Bonella Ramsay discuss the threats to data privacy (especially medical) posed by AI. (Here comes the GDPR again.)

 

  • Here’s an excellent overview of AI in the world of patents.

 

  • Lloyd’s of London signed a global deal with Expert System to use the company’s Cognito software, “to modernize its business processes in order to support the needs of market participants.”

 

 

  • Can AI be “sentient”? “Conscious”? “Self-aware”? Have a soul? I always sidestep these issues in my presentations but love to argue about them over a bottle of wine. This editorial from the Washington Post (by Jonathan Aberman) surfaces those issues but doesn’t firmly take a position. (Good!) I love the title, “Think humans are superior to AI? Don’t be a ‘carbon chauvinist’.”

 

  • Here are a few interesting pieces about advances in AI generally (not directly law-related):
    • Nvidia has created the world’s first artificial intelligence computer to make self-driving “robotaxis” a reality — the kind that won’t even have a steering wheel or a gas pedal.
    • How about cars that can see around corners? “The CSAIL team’s imaging system, which can work with smartphone cameras, uses information about light reflections to detect objects or people in a hidden scene and measure their speed and trajectory — all in real-time.” Wow.
    • “Deep Learning pioneer Twenty Billion Neurons (TwentyBN) debuts an AI technology that is the world’s first to show an awareness of its environment and of the actions occurring within it.”
    • Grocer Tesco seems to be testing the sort of checkout-free supermarkets being tried by Amazon Go.
    • I have posted many times about the race between nations to become leaders in AI. Now, it seems, the Japanese government is determined to catch up with the Chinese. “Japan needs to do everything in its power to catch up.” Good luck with that.